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New Taiwan HM player - 07 Aug 08


#1

Scientists developed new platform for large-scale production of dermal papilla microtissues for hair follicle regeneration.

Scientists at the Institute of Biomedical Engineering, National Taiwan University developed new platform for large-scale production of dermal papilla microtissues for hair follicle regeneration. Dermal papilla is know to be essential for the induction of the regeneration of new hair follicles (so-called hair multiplication) in adult animals and humans.

Major obstacle in achieving effective large-scale hair regeneration platform based on use of dermal papilla induction properties is in inability to efficiently produce dermal papilla aggregates in cell culture.

Now scientists developed cell culture platform when dermal papilla cells are seeded onto poly(ethylene-co-vinyl alcohol) (EVAL) membranes. EVAL facilitates dermal papilla cells self-assembly into many compact spheroidal microtissues that are able to induce new hair follices. This system can be used as part of large-scale efficient hair multiplication protocol.

New hair follicles induced by dermal papillae microtissues

This study is published in 2008 edition of journal Biomaterials


#2

Title:
Self-assembly of dermal papilla cells into inductive spheroidal microtissues on poly(ethylene-co-vinyl alcohol) membranes for hair follicle regeneration.

Author(s):
Young TH , Lee CY , Chiu HC , Hsu CJ , Lin SJ

Publication Date:
07-08-2008

Abstract:

Self-aggregation is key to hair follicle (HF) induction ability of dermal papilla (DP) cells and neogenesis of HF can be achieved by transplanting DP microtissues. However, there is currently lack of a suitable system that allows efficient production of DP microtissues and analysis of DP self-aggregation in vitro. We demonstrate that, at a higher seeding cell density, poly(ethylene-co-vinyl alcohol) (EVAL) membranes facilitate DP self-assembly into many compact spheroidal microtissues that are able to induce new HFs. This self-assembling process is associated with an enhanced cell movement and a declined cell-substrate adhesivity on EVAL. A compromised cell growth is also revealed on EVAL. On the contrary, a more adherent surface allows faster cell expansion but maintains DP cells in a flat morphology. Dynamically, cell migration, intercellular collision and intercellular adhesion contribute to DP microtissue formation on EVAL. Our results suggest that, for large-scale production of DP microtissues for HF regeneration, an adhesive surface is needed for quick cell expansion and a biomaterial with a lower adhesivity is required for self-aggregation. In addition, this system can be a model for investigation of DP self-aggregation in vitro.

Article Outline

  1. Introduction
  2. Materials and methods
    2.1. Poly(ethylene-co-vinyl alcohol) (EVAL) membrane preparation
    2.2. Cell culture
    2.3. Cell attachment and cell growth
    2.4. Determination of conditions that yield DP microtissues
    2.5. Viability of DP microtissues
    2.6. Morphology, molecular markers and HF induction ability of DP microtissues
    2.7. Time-lapse microscopy, cell migration and dynamic process of microtissue formation
  3. Results
    3.1. The formation of multicellular DP microtissues on EVAL membranes at higher seeding cell number
    3.2. Local cell density is the major determinant of DP microtissue formation on EVAL membranes
    3.3. Number and size distribution of DP microtissues on EVAL membranes
    3.4. Characters of DP microtissues on EVAL
    3.5. High viability of cells in DP microtissues and the transformable cell morphology on different substratum
    3.6. DP microtissues are able to induce new HFs
    3.7. Declined adhesivity and enhanced cell migration on EVAL membranes
    3.8. Dynamics of DP microtissue formation on EVAL membranes
    3.9. Enhanced cell growth on the adhesive surface
  4. Discussion
  5. Conclusion
    Acknowledgements
    References

Source: Biomaterials (Biomaterials) or not only
Journal Rank: 8.20308799848442Rank is based on: Journal Citation Reports® Impact Factors published by Thomson Scientific, Inc. Rank range: from 0.01 to 100
Forward Citations: No PubMed citations
Volume: 29(26)
Publication Date: 07-08-2008
Research Institution: Institute of Biomedical Engineering, College of Medicine and College of Engineering, National Taiwan University, No. 1, Sec. 1, Jen-Ai Road, Taipei 100, Taiwan.
Publication Type: Journal Article
Publication Language: eng
Main Field(s) of Science/Medicine: ,
Additional Field(s) of Science/Medicine:


#3

link:-P


#4

I don’t know how you do it chrome… err I mean col,
but many thanks for all the great articles you find.

.


#5

Yeah I have posted short note of this before but it got lost and I was not able to find any particularly interesting information about it apart from that single photo of hair growing in random directions.

From what you have found col. It looks like they already have the grafts or is the sphere something else?

How about direction problem? On the only image they provided it looks like a huge issue

In the end though this could be huge … imagine that you would have fued this into your head and you would not need to go through the donor harvesting. I can imagine that one day they could be able to automate it a lot, both graft manufacturing and even the injection side could be easy.


#6

In the end though this could be huge … imagine that you would have fued this into your head and you would not need to go through the donor harvesting. I can imagine that one day they could be able to automate it a lot, both graft manufacturing and even the injection side could be easy.

That’s what I’m thinking too. Now combine that technology with a Restorations Robotics hair transplant robot, and you’ve got yourself a full head of hair at a fraction of the cost of today’s crappy hair transplants.

.


#7

Is it just a theory or do they have working prototypes? :slight_smile: We need to mail these guys :slight_smile:

» In the end though this could be huge … imagine that you
» would have fued
this into your head and you would not need to go
» through the donor harvesting. I can imagine that one day they could be able
» to automate it a lot, both graft manufacturing and even the injection side
» could be easy.
»
» That’s what I’m thinking too. Now combine that technology with a
» Restorations
» Robotics hair transplant robot
, and you’ve got yourself a full head
» of hair at a fraction of the cost of today’s crappy hair transplants.
»
»
»
» .


#8

» Is it just a theory or do they have working prototypes? :slight_smile: We need to mail
» these guys :slight_smile:

I couldn’t find their website, but reportedly the company got $25 million in funding last August (compare that to 5 million for Follica in January), and I found one article (dated July 29th, 2008) that says “The robot is honing its skills on volunteers in California.” Even Dr. Rassman doesn’t have anything bad to say about the technology. Than again, he has a financial stake in the company. Apparently, he gave them rights to use his U.S. Patent to perform such a surgery.

.


#9

The above paper was first presented at the 5th International Congress of Hair Research, Vancouver, Canada, June 13-16, 2007.

The National Taiwan University website is:
http://www.ntu.edu.tw/english/

There are so many things near fruition to solve hairloss the future looks great. Yet another new one is the Laminin-511 scalp injections due within “2 years”.


#10

»
» There are so many things near fruition to solve hairloss the future looks
» great. Yet another new one is the Laminin-511 scalp injections due within
» “2 years”.

Agreed. I feel like they’re “closing in on it”. I’m happy that many companies are approaching it from many different angles. Sooner or later one of them will work.


#11

» There are so many things near fruition to solve hairloss the future looks
» great. Yet another new one is the Laminin-511 scalp injections due within
» “2 years”.

I have never seen so much news flow; it’s freaking amazing. I just saw your article on HLT. You have to post it here col.

.


#12

» Isn’t this similar to intercytex? It dosen’t mention how it is really going to work to achieve a cosmetically acceptable head of hair. They may be more interested in money from investers than really curing this thing.
» .


#13

»
» New hair follicles induced by dermal papillae microtissues
»
» This study is published in 2008 edition of journal Biomaterials

the fact that they are posting a photo speaks volumes to me. I am tired of promises and theories.

But I wonder how it is possible that only DP-cells are able to form these little follicles without any other ingredients except the EVAL substrate??

Now scientists developed cell culture platform when dermal papilla cells are seeded onto poly(ethylene-co-vinyl alcohol) (EVAL) membranes. EVAL facilitates dermal papilla cells self-assembly into many compact spheroidal microtissues that are able to induce new hair follices. This system can be used as part of large-scale efficient hair multiplication protocol.
<<<


#14

» »
»
» » New hair follicles induced by dermal papillae microtissues
» »
» » This study is published in 2008 edition of journal Biomaterials
»
»
» But I wonder how it is possible that only DP-cells are able to form these
» little follicles without any other ingredients except the EVAL substrate??
»

and they are black. Where do the melanocytes come from?


#15

» Isn’t this similar to intercytex? It dosen’t mention how it is really
» going to work to achieve a cosmetically acceptable head of hair. They may
» be more interested in money from investers than really curing this thing.

Correct me if I’m wrong, but the biggest problem with Intercytex and Aderans was that they just cultured and injected the cells into the head (without knowing if those cells were going to do a damn thing or not). By contrast, this process seems to take the in vitro approach… allowing the cells to mature before they’re implanted. That alone ensures a higher success rate.

I always like to use gardening analogies in these sorts of cases. Intercytex and Aderans threw some seeds onto the ground hoping they would get a forest. These guys are growing saplings before they plant them.

.


#16

»
» Now scientists developed cell culture platform when dermal papilla cells
» are seeded onto poly(ethylene-co-vinyl alcohol) (EVAL) membranes. EVAL
» facilitates dermal papilla cells self-assembly into many compact spheroidal
» microtissues that are able to induce new hair follices
.
»

I think ICX did the Dermal papillas multiplication and they injected them…But “I think” the injected DPS would not regroup in vivo (in the scalp) in order to induce new HFs.


#17

» This is probably the reason why Intercytex has been <>
» now…They did the Dermal papillas multiplication and they injected
» them…But the injected DPS Would not regroup in vivo (in the scalp) in
» order to induce new HFs.

ICX injected aggregates of cells, not just loose cells.
And all this time ARI has been using scaffolds precisely to aggregate the cells.

So this need for aggregation is not new at all.


#18

» » This is probably the reason why Intercytex has been <>
» » now…They did the Dermal papillas multiplication and they injected
» » them…But the injected DPS Would not regroup in vivo (in the scalp) in
» » order to induce new HFs.
»
» ICX injected aggregates of cells, not just loose cells.
» And all this time ARI has been using scaffolds precisely to aggregate the
» cells.
»
» So this need for aggregation is not new at all.

Are you sure those scaffolds are viable and efficient in vivo ?


#19

Found another one.
http://www.hairsite.com/hair-loss/forum_entry-id-36121-page-0-category-2-order-last_answer-descasc-DESC.html

.


#20

» Are you sure those scaffolds are viable and efficient in vivo ?

I don’t know anything about the efficiency.
All I know is that ARI has been all these years filing many patents about scaffolds. I think all of their patents are about scaffolds, even the recent ones.
So they keep investigating in this field. There must be a reason.