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Is Dr. Nigam working with Aderans?


#1

What’s Washniek doing in this photo with Nigam?

Washniek is the head for Aderans Scientific. Although the parent company in Japan seems to have pulled the plug (or suspended?) their ongoing research into Ji Gami after having put over 150 million into it - perhaps due to dwindling funds? (speculation).

Perhaps if Nigam comes up with something workable for follicular neogenesis which Aderans can work into its Phase II clinical trials (without having to re-do Phase I), he might yet save the day for Aderans if they decide to license it.

All speculation of course - could be just a photo op.


#2

I think that if Aderans makes any changes to their protocols they have to start over with phase 1.


#3

Looks like a conference photo op.


#4

Er, no, this is from the Hair Restoration Congress earlier this year.


#5

Aderans is probably completely gone. I noticed several days ago that they have even taken down their website www.aderansresearch.com. Or to be correct something is left there but very little and information presented very amateurish. Nothing to learn from Washenik / Aderans because their technology just doesn’t work.


#6

aderans may die but I think there’s still hope for cell based hair treatments.

[quote][postedby]Originally Posted by spot[/postedby]
Aderans is probably completely gone. I noticed several days ago that they have even taken down their website www.aderansresearch.com. Or to be correct something is left there but very little and information presented very amateurish. Nothing to learn from Washenik / Aderans because their technology just doesn’t work.[/quote]


#7

Its astonishing (and scary) to think Aderans didn’t accomplish anything after all those years of effort, money & time.

Anyone care to email Aderans or Washnenik to find out what the current status is.


#8

you can repeat that all you like but fact of the matter is that noone is even near to bringing any cell based treatments to market any time soon.

[quote]aderans may die but I think there’s still hope for cell based hair treatments.

[postedby]Originally Posted by spot[/postedby]
Aderans is probably completely gone. I noticed several days ago that they have even taken down their website www.aderansresearch.com. Or to be correct something is left there but very little and information presented very amateurish. Nothing to learn from Washenik / Aderans because their technology just doesn’t work.

[postedby]Originally Posted by jarjarbinx[/postedby][/quote]


#9

[quote]you can repeat that all you like but fact of the matter is that noone is even near to bringing any cell based treatments to market any time soon.
[/quote]

Depends on what you mean by “bringing it to market”. If you mean an FDA-approved or EU-approved procedure which has gone through years of expensive official clinical trials, then you’re right.

If you mean that some enterprising researcher in a low-regulation country (like India or many others) can’t develop something that works well enough, and offer it to patients, I think you have to reconsider that, because it’s entirely possible in the next few years.


#10

I cannot think of a single successful treatment which has ever been administered in the past, in third world countries in order to avoid EU/US regulatory agency restrictions. Particularly nothing as high-tech as culturing cells etc.

Can you name any such example? I certainly can’t.

In fact I think it is mere wishful thinking, but of course I would welcome it if Dr Nigam would prove me wrong on this.

[quote]you can repeat that all you like but fact of the matter is that noone is even near to bringing any cell based treatments to market any time soon.

[postedby]Originally Posted by roger_that[/postedby]

Depends on what you mean by “bringing it to market”. If you mean an FDA-approved or EU-approved procedure which has gone through years of expensive official clinical trials, then you’re right.

If you mean that some enterprising researcher in a low-regulation country (like India or many others) can’t develop something that works well enough, and offer it to patients, I think you have to reconsider that, because it’s entirely possible in the next few years.[/quote]


#11

What about Dr. Nigam? He is already selling and marketing cell based hair multiplication but it sounds like you guys are dismissing him already. I am new here, am I missing something?


#12

I am not dismissing him. In fact I think he is making a sincere effort to make this work and I truly hope he succeeds. However, Dr Nigam has not really offered any conclusive proof that he can grow/restore hair.

[quote][postedby]Originally Posted by whyme[/postedby]
What about Dr. Nigam? He is already selling and marketing cell based hair multiplication but it sounds like you guys are dismissing him already. I am new here, am I missing something?[/quote]


#13

Dr. Nigam has generated some regrowth.

The drawback is that he has not been able to generate enough hair growth thus far.

He’s trying to improve the results. He’s trying different things. We need to have patience.


#14

Aderans began their project with “designer hair” in mind. Little by little they downgraded what appeared to be achievable until eventually it reached something so small it didn’t appear to even be marketable. (For an MPB treatment that means it had to be pretty f*cking bad.)

They did basically fail. They just didn’t have a single trial incident where their original expectations collided head-on with their final progress. It happened gradually in small steps.

My interest in cell-based treatments will be revived as soon as somebody convinces me that it’s not way more sensible to dump that effort into a wounding-based project like Follica.

Washenik’s cell-based science was a decent idea to investigate a decade ago. But it appears to have been the wrong choice in hindsight and I don’t blame ARI’s parent company for finally bailing on it. If Cotsarelis had gotten the $150 million that went to Washenik during the last decade then we might be out of this mess right now.


#15

If the latest find is revolutionary, you would think a country like India would buy the technology and create a team of Doctors to bring this to the market. India currently does this with technology. They would make billions! However, I don’t believe all these so called cures. I believe most of these researches create elaborate articles to entice investors to invest keeping these researches employed with their oversize salaries. Remember, they always say five years. That is how long the money they received will last! At the end of five years, if they can’t entice other investors, they die off. Hate to be a pessimist but I see what I see!


#16

I have to disagree on that. It’s pretty obvious that sooner or later it will be possible to reproduce the kind of results that we have seen on rodents (thick tufts of hair on naked skin). It’s a matter of time until it can be done experimentally, they have made a good step forward in that direction with the recent proof of concept study. I’m pretty sure that bringing this kind of treatment to market however will take a whole lot of time.

[quote][postedby]Originally Posted by cal[/postedby]
Aderans began their project with “designer hair” in mind. Little by little they downgraded what appeared to be achievable until eventually it reached something so small it didn’t appear to even be marketable. (For an MPB treatment that means it had to be pretty f*cking bad.)

They did basically fail. They just didn’t have a single trial incident where their original expectations collided head-on with their final progress. It happened gradually in small steps.

My interest in cell-based treatments will be revived as soon as somebody convinces me that it’s not way more sensible to dump that effort into a wounding-based project like Follica.

Washenik’s cell-based science was a decent idea to investigate a decade ago. But it appears to have been the wrong choice in hindsight and I don’t blame ARI’s parent company for finally bailing on it. If Cotsarelis had gotten the $150 million that went to Washenik during the last decade then we might be out of this mess right now.[/quote]


#17

[quote][postedby]Originally Posted by superhl[/postedby]
I believe most of these researches create elaborate articles to entice investors to invest keeping these researches employed with their oversize salaries.[/quote]

Most researchers get paid less than you might think.


#18

I never said cell-based treatments won’t work. I said I don’t think cell-based treatments are the best/fastest way to get new hair onto our heads.

Wounding has already produced thick tufts of hair on the shiny bald skin of live humans. It required no new drugs and in some cases no drugs at all. We’re sitting here bald just because nobody has done the research to figure out how to repeat that process. The process has had practically no research done on it whatsoever before 2008, and only a small operation’s efforts since then.


#19

Can you show the evidence of that? Photos?

Non-scalp parts of the anatomy don’t qualify as “bald”, so they don’t count.


#20

[quote]
Wounding has already produced thick tufts of hair on the shiny bald skin of live humans. It required no new drugs and in some cases no drugs at all. We’re sitting here bald just because nobody has done the research to figure out how to repeat that process. The process has had practically no research done on it whatsoever before 2008, and only a small operation’s efforts since then.[/quote]

I do not believe for one second that wounding causes dense hair regrowth on bald shiny skin (top of the head) because if that were true then we could all get our hair back tomorrow.