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I wonder what news Dr. Nigam will share when he posts again


#1

Does anyone have any guesses?


#2

Roger,Freddie, Jarjar,

I discussed the following with jahoda…
1)How to increase conductivity of dp cells in culture.
2)Will he be open to work as a team with few other researchers.
3)How to increase mass production of 3d spheroids of dp cultured cells.
4)How to inject 3d spheroidal dp cultured cells.
i will post the details of this discussion tonight.
I also spoke to washniek, whether he,stenn.or any of his researcher who was part of aderans research,be willing to be part of a new team of researchers…and willing to utilize my lab in india with favourable regulations.

In the meantime,kindly go through these presentations made at world congress on hair research at edinburgh…regards increasing conductivity od cultured dp cells…

Hair follicle restoration by intradermal microinjection of trichogenous dermal cells in a humanized-scalp model mouse
M Inamatsu1, M Yamao1, T Okada1 and K Yoshizato1,2 1Phoenixbio Co., Ltd., Higashihirroshima, Japan and 2Osaka City University, Osaka, Japan
Hair follicles (HFs) are generated in the embryonic skin development and, once established, are retained through life by a unique self-renewal activity termed recycling. Hitherto, accumulated studies have revealed basic mechanisms underlying these processes, and the development of modern technologies has enabled us to manipulate the cells that have major roles in these processes. However, therapeutic technology has not been established by which clinicians can restore weakened or miniaturized hairs by autotransplanting healthy trichogenous dermal cells. The absence of a suitable rodent model for evaluating the therapeutic activities of the respective hair follicle cells in regeneration and restoration of damaged human HFs (h-HFs) has been one of the said obstacles. In the present study, we first generated a rodent model that has the humanized skin composed of h-HFs, which we call “a humanized scalpmodel mouse”. Second, we damaged the model’s h-HFs in their lower half parts by inserting an ophthalmologist’s scalpel. Third, we microinjected into the amputated area the NEO-STEMlabeled human trichogenous dermal cells, which had been propagated in serial cultivation, and we followed the development and growth of the damaged HFs up to 8 weeks posttransplantation. These transplanted cells were incorporated into the damaged regions of the HFs by 2 weeks after transplantation and participated in restoring hair bulbs. These HFs composed of host cells and transplanted cells, which we call chimeric HFs, continued to develop into normal hairs by 8 weeks posttransplantation. In conclusion, HFs whose lower half parts had been injured were restorable to normal HFs by receiving exogenous trichogeneous dermal cells into the damaged regions. The presently developed humanized scalpmodel mice are expected to be an appropriate and useful in vivo model to explore a clinically effective technology for hair restoration therapy by autologous cell transplantation to patients with weakened or miniaturized hairs such as androgenic alopecia.

Involvement of the immune response in regeneration of experimentally amputated whisker follicles in vivo and in a novel culture model of regeneration using newborn follicles
S-W Li1,2, C Higgins3, K Sorensen2, AM Christiano3 and CA Jahoda2 1College of Life Science, Tarim University, Alar, China; 2School of Biological and Biomedical Sciences, Durham University, Durham, UK and 3Department of Dermatology, Columbia University, New York, USA
Follicles have a unique capacity to regenerate a functional end bulb after experimental amputation. Previous work suggests that regeneration entails an initial phase resembling skin wound healing, followed by specific remodeling of the bulb involving epithelialmesenchymal interactions. A key feature of the phenomenon is that the mesenchymal (dermal) components of the follicle (the dermal papilla and dermal sheath) reconstitute without scarring (fibrosis). Macrophages, as well as TGFβ family members, have been strongly linked with fibrosis; therefore one hypothesis is that lower follicle regeneration involves a reduced or modified immune response. This study aimed to investigate this question and to develop a novel culture model of follicle regeneration. For in vivo studies mouse and rat whisker follicles were experimentally amputated and follicles recovered between 24 hours and 3 weeks postoperatively. For in vitro work, follicles were isolated from newborn mice, bases amputated, and the follicles cultured on filters for up to 4 days. All specimens were cryofrozen or wax processed for immunohistochemistry/immunofluorescence. Early changes to the epithelium mirrored that of skin wound healing with migration of the follicle epithelium to fill the inner follicle silo, upregulation of cytokeratin15 near the follicle base, and strong expression of fibronectin. The in vitro model was able to undergo this first phase of regeneration. Labeling of in vivo specimens with a CD68 antibody (rat) and CD11b, F4/80 antibodies (mouse) identified highest concentrations of macrophages around the site of amputation at 48 hours, these cells being lost by 7 days. Interestingly, macrophages were also detected in the culture model. TGFβ1 was strongly expressed in follicle dermis, although, interestingly, not at the immediate site of dermal papilla regeneration. We suggest that lack of scarring in regenerated follicles cannot be attributed to lack of an immune response, although subtleties involving macrophage subpopulations are currently being investigated.

New development in unlimited hair follicle transplant
C-M Lin1, K Huang2 and Y Li3 1Shantou University Medical College, Shantou, China; 2Second Affiliated Hospital, Shantou University Medical College, Shantou, China and 3First Affiliated Hospital, Shantou University Medical College, Shantou, China
Hair transplantation has had an important role in the treatment of hair loss. However, hair transplantation in fact represents hair redistribution. Thus, traditional hair transplantation is greatly restricted by insufficient transplants. Some studies have demonstrated that HF (hair follicle) upper fragments can regrow HFs. Despite the low success rate, hair graft number can be increased by hair follicle dissection. Here, we established a method to increase the regrowth rate of “single HF upper fragments.” HF upper fragments were obtained from the vibrissa of SpragueDawley rats at the level of hair bulb. Segments were transplanted underneath the skin of nude mice (6 segments per mouse, 1.5-cm distance between segments). Then culture medium of vibrissa HF was injected into the transplanted sites every 2 days, and grafts were excised at days 3, 7, and 9 and weeks 2 and 4. The control group received DMEM+10% fetal calf serum instead of HF culture medium. In all, 91.7% of the fragments (66/72) were able to regrow into intact HF from 7 days to 4 weeks. Only 2/38 of control mice fragments showed intact HF regrowth after 4 weeks of transplantation. We traced the expression of Wnt5a during the regrowth of HF: at 3 days after transplantation, the experimental group showed Wnt5a expression at the newly formed connective sheets. At 9 days, Wnt5a was expressed strongly at the typical newly formed DPs. We also designed a novel HF transplantation device that includes scissors at the bottom to dissect the HF bulb when obtaining HF from the donor. The remaining HF bulbs were able to regrow intact HFs in the donor sites. As well, the upper site of HFs can be used as hair graft transplants by the method above. Thus, our HF fragment transplantation method is a new development in unlimited hair follicle transplant.

Scalable production of controllable dermal papilla spheroids on polyvinyl alcohol surface: effect of spheroid size on efficiency and efficacy of hair follicle regeneration
Y-C Huang1, C-C Chan1,2, W-T Lin1, H-Y Chiu2,3 and S-J Lin1,2 1Institute of Biomedical Engineering, National Taiwan University, Taipei, Taiwan, Republic of China; 2Department of Dermatology, National Taiwan University Hospital and College of Medicine, Taipei, Taiwan, Republic of China and 3Department of Dermatology, Hsin-Chu Branch of National Taiwan University Hospital, Hsinchu City, Taiwan, Republic of China
Organ size and numbers are vital issues in bioengineering for hair follicle (HF) regeneration. Murine HF dermal papilla (DP) cells are able to induce HF neogenesis when transplanted as aggregates. However, how the preparation of murine and human DP aggregates affects HF inductivity and the size of regenerated HF is yet to be determined. Here, we report a scalable method for the production of controllable human and rat DP spheroids in general labs for reproducible experiments. Compared with more hydrophobic polyethylene and poly(ethylene-co-vinyl alcohol), DP cells are poorly adhesive to hydrophilic polyvinyl alcohol (PVA). Seeded in the PVA-coated 96-welled commercial PCR tube arrays, DP cells quickly aggregate into single spheroids with progressive compaction. Varying seeded cell numbers and culture periods enable us to control the size and cell number of the spheroids. The spheroids obtained have high viability and preserve DP characters. A proof of principle experiment was conducted to examine the size effect on the efficiency and efficacy of HF regeneration. We found that both human and rat DP spheroids are able to induce HF neogenesis and larger DP spheroids exhibit higher HF inductivity. However, the average diameter of regenerated hair fiber did not significantly change with the increasing size of transplanted DP spheroids. The result suggests that an appropriate size of DP spheroid is essential for HF inductivity, but its size cannot be directly translated to a thicker regenerated hair. Our results also have implications on the efficiency and efficacy in the regeneration of other epithelial organs.

Optimized preparation of dermal papilla cell (DPC) construct for hair regeneration therapy
H Kato, K N Aoi, K Inoue and K Yoshimura Department of Plastic Surgery, University of Tokyo, Tokyo, Japan
Introduction: To develop an efficient and practical hair regeneration therapy, we have sought to optimize DPC culture method (Aoi N, et al. Stem Cells Transl Med, 2012) and DPC transplantation method, which we call “hemi-vascularized sandwich (HVS) method” (Aoi N, et al. J Tissue Eng Regen Med, 2012). In this study, we sought to optimize preparation of transplantation construct of cultured DPCs.

Methods: We prepared three different DPC transplants (cell suspension, cell sheet and cell aggregation) using cultivated rat DPCs (rDPCs), rDSCs (dermal sheeth cells), rDFs (dermal fibroblasts), h (human) DSCs, hDPCs, and hASCs (adipose-derived stem cells). Expression of hair inductivity-associated genes was examined with real time RT-PCR. Each cell construct was transplanted into the sole skin of rat with HVS method. In addition, some constructs were combined with aggregation, sheet, or collagen scaffold. Eight weeks after transplantation, harvested samples were histologically evaluated.

Results: Electron microscope showed that a large aggregate made of 15 small DPC aggregations had a proper space to allow plasmatic diffusion and avoid central necrosis. In both rat and human samples, TGFβ2 mRNA expression was the highest in cell sheet than other constructs in both DPCs and DSCs. Wnt10b was higher in aggregation than in suspension and sheet in rDSCs and hDSCs. ALP was higher in aggregation than in suspension and sheet in human DSCs and DPCs. In animal experiments, visible hairs were regenerated only in DPC sheet transplantation, while immature hair follicles were histologically observed in aggregation and combinations with aggregation.

Discussions/Conclusions: The construct form substantially changed DPC function such as hair inductivity. TGFβ2 expression appeared to be a reliable index predicting hair inducing capacity of DPCs. A sheet was the most efficient form with functioning DPCs, but a combination with undifferentiated aggregates may work better for hair regeneration with cycling.

Laser-assisted rapid patterning of epithelial-mesenchymal interaction for skin and hair follicle regeneration
W-H Wang1, C-C Chan1,2, M-W Lin1, M-Y Fan1, H-W Lee1 and S-J Lin1,2 1Institute of Biomedical Engineering, National Taiwan University, Taipei, Taiwan, Republic of China and 2Department of Dermatology, National Taiwan University Hospital and College of Medicine, Taipei, Taiwan, Republic of China
Bioartificial skin containing keratinocytes and fibroblasts has been used to accelerate wound healing and reduce scar contracture. However, the skin appendages including hair follicles cannot be regenerated. Reconstitution of appropriate epithelial-mesenchymal interactions that can elicit regeneration of arrays of hair follicles with desired distribution is essential for regeneration of fully functional skin. Here, we developed a method for fast patterning of keratinocytes, fibroblasts and trichogenic dermal papilla cells into desired topological arrangement on a glass chip. The cell adhesivity of poly-(vinyl alcohol) (PVA) dynamically varies in the presence of serum. Freshly PVA-coated glass is non-adherent to all three cells, but it becomes adherent to fibroblasts and DP cells later in culture. We take this advantage as a surface barrier for cell patterning through laser-assisted surface microfabrication. By varying carbon dioxide laser parameters for ablation, we are able to create arrays of micro-domains of controllable size, depth and spacing on PVA-coated glass chips. With the adjustment of cell seeding, DP cells attach to these micro-domains, forming corresponding arrays of multicellular aggregates of controllable size and cell number. Fibroblasts seeded later adhere to the cell-free PVA domain as the substratum adhesivity increases. The finally seeded keratinocytes attach either to fibroblasts or DP cells depending on the cell types they contact. The final organization is an epithelial sheet on top of a mesenchymal layer of fibroblasts doped with arrays of DP islets. Functionally, keratinocytes on top of DP islets, but not those on top of fibroblasts, show differentiation toward HF. This method con be applied in the research of interactions between heterotypic cells, and it also shows potential for generation of bioartificial skin with patternable epithelial-mesenchymal interaction.

Maintenance of hair-inducing capacity of cultured dermal cells by addition of cell culture medium
Y Sung1, J Sung2, M Kim1 and J Kim1 1School of Medicine, Kyungpook National University, Daegu, Republic of Korea and 2CHA University, Seoul, Republic of Korea
The neogenesis of the hair follicle through cultured cell implantation is a promising alternative for the treatment of hair loss. Success of neogenesis of the hair follicle greatly depends on the ability to expand hair-inductive dermal cells in vitro. However, cultured dermal cells lose their hair follicle-inducing capacity (trichogenicity) during subculture. Therefore, to achieve successful hair follicle neogenesis, identification of cell culture conditions that enable dermal cells to maintain trichogenicity is an important matter. In this study, we show our data of maintenance of trichogenicity of dermal cells by treatment with human follicular keratinocyte-conditioned media. We also show enhancement of trichogenicity of dermal cells by UVB-irradiated adipose-derived stem cell-conditioned media.

SOX2 expression in human scalp derived follicular progenitor cells correlates with trichogenicity
B Marshall, K Watkins, X Wu, C Ingraham and K Stenn Aderans Research Institute, Marietta, Georgia, USA
Hair follicle formation and growth is driven by stem cell populations in both the epidermal and dermal compartments. SOX2 gene expression in mouse has been found in the dermal papilla of guard, awl, and auchene, but not zig-zag, hairs. Moreover, SOX2 identifies skin derived precursor cells, cells which have stem cell, trichogenic and homing properties. We have been interested in defining the trichogenic dermal stem cell population of human scalp. In this study we focused on the properties of SOX2 using immunohistochemistry, a triochogenic bioassay (Aderans HPA, Hair Patch Assay, [Zheng et al. 2005]), enhanced culture conditions, and RT-PCR techniques. SOX2 is expressed throughout morphogenesis starting with the dermal condensate. In adult occipital skin follicles, SOX2 is expressed in the dermal papilla and sheath of all follicles and in all stages of follicle cycling. To test the correlation between SOX2 expression and trichogenic potential, we isolated dermal cells from adult occipital scalp and assessed cellular trichogenicity with a bioassay (Aderans HPA). We found a correlation of bioassay response to level of SOX2 expression. To directly test the role of SOX2 in trichogenic potency of the cells we used siRNA to knock down SOX2 expression in cultured cells. siRNA not only reduced SOX2 expression of the transfected dermal cells (greater than two fold reduction) but also abrogated their trichogenicity. This work convincingly links SOX2 gene expression to the dermal papilla and sheath cells of human scalp follicles. SOX2 expression of scalp derived cells is maintained in culture and correlates with trichogenicity.


#3

I’m on a lunch break at work right now so I can only lightly peruse the information at this time. I will read it all through more carefully this evening when I get off work. Right now I already picked out one hopeful notation that I would like to post enalarged below:

In this study, we show our data of maintenance of trichogenicity of dermal cells by treatment with human follicular keratinocyte-conditioned media. We also show enhancement of trichogenicity of dermal cells by UVB-irradiated adipose-derived stem cell-conditioned media.


#4

Keep in mind that since you are applying growth factors to harvested HF cells you could be turning those harvested HF cells into progenitor cells while in culture. How progenitor cells created in culture can have hair growth trichogenicity is a big question. I wonder if this abstract 9n italics posted by you might be relevant to this issue:

SOX2 expression in human scalp derived follicular progenitor cells correlates with trichogenicity
B Marshall, K Watkins, X Wu, C Ingraham and K Stenn Aderans Research Institute, Marietta, Georgia, USA
Hair follicle formation and growth is driven by stem cell populations in both the epidermal and dermal compartments. SOX2 gene expression in mouse has been found in the dermal papilla of guard, awl, and auchene, but not zig-zag, hairs. Moreover, SOX2 identifies skin derived precursor cells, cells which have stem cell, trichogenic and homing properties. We have been interested in defining the trichogenic dermal stem cell population of human scalp. In this study we focused on the properties of SOX2 using immunohistochemistry, a triochogenic bioassay (Aderans HPA, Hair Patch Assay, [Zheng et al. 2005]), enhanced culture conditions, and RT-PCR techniques. SOX2 is expressed throughout morphogenesis starting with the dermal condensate. In adult occipital skin follicles, SOX2 is expressed in the dermal papilla and sheath of all follicles and in all stages of follicle cycling. To test the correlation between SOX2 expression and trichogenic potential, we isolated dermal cells from adult occipital scalp and assessed cellular trichogenicity with a bioassay (Aderans HPA). We found a correlation of bioassay response to level of SOX2 expression. To directly test the role of SOX2 in trichogenic potency of the cells we used siRNA to knock down SOX2 expression in cultured cells. siRNA not only reduced SOX2 expression of the transfected dermal cells (greater than two fold reduction) but also abrogated their trichogenicity. This work convincingly links SOX2 gene expression to the dermal papilla and sheath cells of human scalp follicles. SOX2 expression of scalp derived cells is maintained in culture and correlates with trichogenicity.


#5

[quote][postedby]Originally Posted by drnigam[/postedby]
Roger,Freddie, Jarjar,

I discussed the following with jahoda…
1)How to increase conductivity of dp cells in culture.
2)Will he be open to work as a team with few other researchers.
3)How to increase mass production of 3d spheroids of dp cultured cells.
4)How to inject 3d spheroidal dp cultured cells.
i will post the details of this discussion tonight.
I also spoke to washniek, whether he,stenn.or any of his researcher who was part of aderans research,be willing to be part of a new team of researchers…and willing to utilize my lab in india with favourable regulations. [/quote]

Thanks for all this great information, Dr. Nigam. Wonderful to hear that you talked to Dr. Jahoda and the others… will be waiting to learn more details.


#6

Looks like my speculative thread on Washenik and Nigam was right on. However as I pointed out in that thread, a working relationship should have been forged years ago - prior to Aderans Scientific expending all of its financial resources. Still, better late than never?

However the real prize would be getting Jahoda/Cristiano onboard. Hopefully they start a working relationship with someone who can test out their theories prior to Phase 1 trials. Let’s hope they do not make the same mistake as Aderans, Intercytex and numerous others that have started out with great promise only to go under.

At least one thing they have been smart enough to do is ensure follicle induction in vitro hanging drop culture prior to implantation of the hair germ into the scalp. That alone will greatly improve their chances of success.

The race is on. Let’s hope the above grouping gets to the finish line ahead of the Japanese researchers who grew a human hair mohawk on a mouse.

One suggestion for Dr. Nigam. Start setting up a research clinical branch in neighboring Nepal. That way if the Indian govt puts restrictions on cell based research and testing, your research can shift there and won’t be disrupted. Do it ahead of time (or at least plan for it) so the change in Indian regulations does not impact your ongoing research.


#7

I wouldn’t go with Nepal. From what I hear, that country is a mess, politically and economically.

Sri Lanka would be better for this kind of medical establishment. Their war is over and the economy is doing better.

My first choice in Asia for starting an advanced cellular hair restoration clinic in a low-regulation country would actually be the Sultanate of Brunei, a very small, peaceuful and wealthy enclave neighboring Malaysia and Indonesia on the island of Borneo. Apparently Brunei is getting serious about investing in medicdal tourism:

http://www.bt.com.bn/news-national/2009/10/16/jpmc-leads-brunei-push-medical-tourism

http://www.bt.com.bn/business-national/2010/01/14/brunei-medical-tourism-lures-us-firm

It’s ideally located to draw patients mostly from mainland Asia as well as Australia.


#8

I would like to also see Dr. Nigam begin planning to relocate his experimentation and I would like it to be to someplace safe. Ultimately Americans will visit Dr. Nigam if he gets hair loss beat but Americans can’t go to an unsafe place anymore than Dr. Nigam would want to go to someplace safe. There are places where people hate Americans and Americans simply can not go there. I’ll fly to the place but i don’t want to get killed. These planes do stopovers and some of the stopovers are not safe. I would prefer a direct flight to someplace safe.

I think Dr. Nigam should set up his research on a Caribbean island that has little or no regulation and then he can cure hair loss, get us our hair back and then Dr. Nigam and the rest of us can all go out on the town for island sunsets and picking up women on caribbean islands.

But don’t bring Hairman because he will scare the girls away.


#9

say the man who doesnt even have a passport :slight_smile: In fact you don’t even know where your parents were born… :rotfl:

you really are a man of questionable intellectual capacity.

[quote][postedby]Originally Posted by jarjarbinx[/postedby]
I would like to also see Dr. Nigam begin planning to relocate his experimentation and I would like it to be to someplace safe. Ultimately Americans will visit Dr. Nigam if he gets hair loss beat but Americans can’t go to an unsafe place anymore than Dr. Nigam would want to go to someplace safe. There are places where people hate Americans and Americans simply can not go there. I’ll fly to the place but i don’t want to get killed. These planes do stopovers and some of the stopovers are not safe. I would prefer a direct flight to someplace safe.

I think Dr. Nigam should set up his research on a Caribbean island that has little or no regulation and then he can cure hair loss, get us our hair back and then Dr. Nigam and the rest of us can all go out on the town for island sunsets and picking up women on caribbean islands.

But don’t bring Hairman because he will scare the girls away.[/quote]


#10

Coming back to work positively…

There is one more issue which needs to be resolved regards 3D speroidal culture.

The problem with 3D spheroid cells transportation from Petridish in the lab onto the patient’s scalp in the clinic.
These 3D spheroids dissociate into 2D cells when transported in a syringe or test tube.
Little bit of movement can make these cells dissociate into 2D(although still better han regular 2d culture).
Now we are planning to have a small room for patients, in the lab premises to implant 3D spheroids directly from the petridish ,to the pipeete,into the hair transplant like recipient incisions.
Before we are able to develop a special syringe with a low adherent surface with wider needle to inject into the scalp.

Jahoda did mention, what I have been saying last few months… that since freshly isolated DP cells are highly trichogenic, the use of these cells along with the hypothesis that upper part of the follicle with dermal cup sheath can regenerate its intact dermal papilla when amputated in-vitro and implanted since it is now proven with various studies that dermal cup sheath cells are pro-genitor to dermal papilla cells, that’s why Jahoda said in its ISHRS presentation , supporting our vie that as on today we can at least double the hair follicles.

I wish to do a small experiment on my own scalp…by injecting the freshly isolated highly trichogenic dp cells with specific dose of growth factors…and see for any neogenesis,and or conversion of vellous to terminal hair.

Jahoda in his presentation at ishrs,snfransisco…
Other potential
developments

• The capacity of human follicle dermal cells to
induce follicles raises genuine possibilities for
creating tissue engineered skin grafts, and skin
equivalents that have the potential to develop hair
follicles and other skin appendages.
The basic regenerative properties of the upper
follicle means that this phenomenon could be
combined with intact papilla follicle induction to at
least double follicle numbers.

Jahoda reffered me to christiano, as he said , she is the one more aggresive with MPB research,she herself have a small spot of alopecia areata.

Christiano is looking for a master gene regulator to improve trichogenicity of cultured dp cells.

[quote][postedby]Originally Posted by drnigam[/postedby]
Roger,Freddie, Jarjar,

I discussed the following with jahoda…
1)How to increase conductivity of dp cells in culture.
2)Will he be open to work as a team with few other researchers.
3)How to increase mass production of 3d spheroids of dp cultured cells.
4)How to inject 3d spheroidal dp cultured cells.
i will post the details of this discussion tonight.
I also spoke to washniek, whether he,stenn.or any of his researcher who was part of aderans research,be willing to be part of a new team of researchers…and willing to utilize my lab in india with favourable regulations.

[postedby]Originally Posted by roger_that[/postedby]

Thanks for all this great information, Dr. Nigam. Wonderful to hear that you talked to Dr. Jahoda and the others… will be waiting to learn more details.[/quote]


#11

I came across a very interesting paper by Dr Ohyama, Keio Univerity http://jcs.biologists.org/content/125/17/4114.full.pdf
in which his group successfully restored normal in vivo expression of 118 different DP genes that had become downregulated after removal to an in vitro environment.

This appears to represent another significant step forward in our understanding of how to regulate or modify the gene expression of DP cells to be able to restore any lost trichogenicity that occurs when they are harvested from the body and expanded in culture.

[quote]Coming back to work positively…

There is one more issue which needs to be resolved regards 3D speroidal culture.

The problem with 3D spheroid cells transportation from Petridish in the lab onto the patient’s scalp in the clinic.
These 3D spheroids dissociate into 2D cells when transported in a syringe or test tube.
Little bit of movement can make these cells dissociate into 2D(although still better han regular 2d culture).
Now we are planning to have a small room for patients, in the lab premises to implant 3D spheroids directly from the petridish ,to the pipeete,into the hair transplant like recipient incisions.
Before we are able to develop a special syringe with a low adherent surface with wider needle to inject into the scalp.

Jahoda did mention, what I have been saying last few months… that since freshly isolated DP cells are highly trichogenic, the use of these cells along with the hypothesis that upper part of the follicle with dermal cup sheath can regenerate its intact dermal papilla when amputated in-vitro and implanted since it is now proven with various studies that dermal cup sheath cells are pro-genitor to dermal papilla cells, that’s why Jahoda said in its ISHRS presentation , supporting our vie that as on today we can at least double the hair follicles.

I wish to do a small experiment on my own scalp…by injecting the freshly isolated highly trichogenic dp cells with specific dose of growth factors…and see for any neogenesis,and or conversion of vellous to terminal hair.

Jahoda in his presentation at ishrs,snfransisco…
Other potential
developments

• The capacity of human follicle dermal cells to
induce follicles raises genuine possibilities for
creating tissue engineered skin grafts, and skin
equivalents that have the potential to develop hair
follicles and other skin appendages.
The basic regenerative properties of the upper
follicle means that this phenomenon could be
combined with intact papilla follicle induction to at
least double follicle numbers.

Jahoda reffered me to christiano, as he said , she is the one more aggresive with MPB research,she herself have a small spot of alopecia areata.

Christiano is looking for a master gene regulator to improve trichogenicity of cultured dp cells.

[postedby]Originally Posted by drnigam[/postedby]
Roger,Freddie, Jarjar,

I discussed the following with jahoda…
1)How to increase conductivity of dp cells in culture.
2)Will he be open to work as a team with few other researchers.
3)How to increase mass production of 3d spheroids of dp cultured cells.
4)How to inject 3d spheroidal dp cultured cells.
i will post the details of this discussion tonight.
I also spoke to washniek, whether he,stenn.or any of his researcher who was part of aderans research,be willing to be part of a new team of researchers…and willing to utilize my lab in india with favourable regulations.

[postedby]Originally Posted by roger_that[/postedby]

Thanks for all this great information, Dr. Nigam. Wonderful to hear that you talked to Dr. Jahoda and the others… will be waiting to learn more details.

[postedby]Originally Posted by drnigam[/postedby][/quote]


#12

Can you post an update on toms case and the other case where an nw5 had 5000 grafts doubled. Also has the case with joshi nw7 to nw1 started. If I remember correctly you said it will start around today or so


#13

HairlossJay,
Joshi the NW7 case had fever today, we will doing his case on 9th,10th and 11th November.

I promised to Roger in the other thread that I will post only few cases which are to be documenting with better pictures with HD before after video with full face. Hence I will not be able to post any case on the forum as I will start HD video from tomorrow only.

Fortunately, I will able to post by month end 15grafts patch test progress by november end,as I have his normal but not HD video, I will take his after HD video. I will also be able to post Mr.Joshis case videos and pictures by 26 or 27 november.
Regarding those want to see photos of not great quality with or without normal video but definately with full face can mail me at dr.rahul1970@gmail.com, provided that they do not post those pictures on forum and I should not be held responsible if they post. ofcourse this photos I will shared with few those beleive on my honesty.

Regardings toms and boldy’s case, I will request the third party that is Dr.Mwamba to provide their photos and his independent assessement. ofcourse I will try to show as much cases possible to the forum members who have been visiting my clinic. for e.g mm12 is visiting mumbai on 18th november, Mwamba on 20th november and so on.Infact on forum viewer is undergoing doubling and HM, he will be there in mumbai 22nd november, I have show him with full face many of the photos, and 22nd November will show him person many patients whose poor photos were posted on the forum. He will also witnees to Mr.Joshi’s cases starting from 9th November.

I want few members including you to mail me at dr.rahul1970@gmail.com so that I can provide them full face photos with proof to counter allegations made by skeptics… as arashi and moopookoo… are going to make new thread… which will be compilation of all their allegations again.
I need few members to counter their allegations strongly once I provide them the proofs on mail.

I can also sponsor(with return air ticket and hotel) roger,freddie or desmond or spencer,or anybody hair loss community decides, who may be considered neutral scientifically knowledgible to thoroughly scrutinized me, my team, my clinic, my lab and my association once and for all…

Boldy was also one of the trusted guy and matched the scientific knowledge of above three, he was there in mumbai 15 days, he had scrutinized everything including my honesty and intentions… but still people do not take his words too.

[quote][postedby]Originally Posted by Hairlossjay[/postedby]
Can you post an update on toms case and the other case where an nw5 had 5000 grafts doubled. Also has the case with joshi nw7 to nw1 started. If I remember correctly you said it will start around today or so[/quote]


#14

@Dr Nigam

Roger_that would be my choice if he finds time to make the trip.

I’m still interested in Dr Cole’s visit if that has progressed?


#15

Just keep doing what you’re doing doc and don’t let the skeptics distract you or shake your confidence.

There are no official high priests in this hair loss community who can scrutinize anyone to everyone’s satisfaction. So I would not bother with getting the approval of some such person if I were you.

Keep documenting your results and post here as and when you can regardless of whether the results are positive or negative. Keep discussing ideas with those of us who really care about the science and you will ultimately win over these skeptics.

The mere fact that you refuse to be run out of here by skeptics and you continue to take all kinds of abuse without losing it mentally says to me you’re the real deal.


#16

What I don’t get is exactly why Nigam feels the need to stir up interest here at all. If he can really do what he says he can do, he should be working with an independent review board to set up trials (for which he obviously wouldn’t charge), quietly set about proving his procedure works, and then demonstrating it when he is ready, and if it is all that he claims it is, make millions.

Since I presume he’s not charging now for an experimental procedure that has yet to be proven in any shape or form, (though that certainly would explain why he’s trying to build up publicity, a la Bazan), I don’t understand it.


#17

[quote][postedby]Originally Posted by licht[/postedby]
What I don’t get is exactly why Nigam feels the need to stir up interest here at all. If he can really do what he says he can do, he should be working with an independent review board to set up trials (for which he obviously wouldn’t charge), quietly set about proving his procedure works, and then demonstrating it when he is ready, and if it is all that he claims it is, make millions.

Since I presume he’s not charging now for an experimental procedure that has yet to be proven in any shape or form, (though that certainly would explain why he’s trying to build up publicity, a la Bazan), I don’t understand it.[/quote]

He needs willing patients to try experimental treatments on. Patients who are essentially paying him - instead of being paid, as is the norm in proper clinical trials - to take part. This however brings with it a number of disadvantages, for example, most of the cases Dr Nigam has posted he has not controlled for other parts of the patients regimen. This is the distinction between a patient and a ‘test subject’. A patient will hop on finasteride and what actually lead to regrowth can not possibly be distinguished.


#18

[quote][postedby]Originally Posted by licht[/postedby]
Since I presume he’s not charging now for an experimental procedure that has yet to be proven in any shape or form, (though that certainly would explain why he’s trying to build up publicity, a la Bazan)[/quote]
If that was true I would have a lot less problems with Nigam. But it’s very far from the truth. He gave a few forum members some discount, but except those 2-3 forum members, EVERYBODY had to pay full prices, sometimes even over $10.000. For something that not only didnt work, but also potentially killed their donor.


#19

Nigam should be paying them not the other way around but then again sheeps deserve to be taken advantage of, some people never learn…I dont feel sorry for these patients, they had all info in front of them and still wanted to go for it.

Forums are full of desperate people who would do anything to get hair back, nigam and others know that very well


#20

[quote]
If that was true I would have a lot less problems with Nigam. But it’s very far from the truth. He gave a few forum members some discount, but except those 2-3 forum members, EVERYBODY had to pay full prices, sometimes even over $10.000. For something that not only didnt work, but also potentially killed their donor.[/quote]

And with that, we have the reason why he spends time drumming up hype on these boards.

And for that very reason, we all have an obligation to apply the utmost scrutiny to those who come here trying to sell us things.

We all understand the desperation that accompanies losing your hair. We have to do our best to protect each other from those who will take advantage of people who are desperate.

$10,000, for essentially nothing. It’s disgusting.