Home | News | Find a Doctor | Ask a Question | Free

Great News from Follica


#1

New patent: it is the method that they will use!!!

http://www.wipo.int/pctdb/en/fetch.jsp?SEARCH_IA=US2007020842&DBSELECT=PCT&C=10&TOTAL=5&IDB=0&TYPE_FIELD=256&SERVER_TYPE=19-10&QUERY=(FP%2Fcotsarelis)+&START=1&ELEMENT_SET=B&SORT=41240713-KEY&RESULT=1&DISP=25&FORM=SEP-0%2FHITNUM%2CB-ENG%2CDP%2CMC%2CAN%2CPA%2CABSUM-ENG&IDOC=1408926&IA=US2007020842&LANG=ENG&DISPLAY=DESC


#2

A new patent for you, do your thing :wink:


#3

there’s an incredible list of “ingredients” used for the formulation…


#4

sounds like a cocktail party all together:-)


#5

» there’s an incredible list of “ingredients” used for the formulation…

But this is it, they tell us all the “secret” compounds they are using. And even how to apply it.
Im no expert but it seems the EGFR inhibitor is responsible for the formulation of hair follicles? They are using gefitinib as an example for EGFR Inhibitor and that is an FDA approved cancer medicine (googled it).
I am sure that someone could use this patent and try this method for them self. And someone probably will.


#6

where are the great news?


#7

where are the great news?

In the world of HT’s “Great” is sadly a relative term…

I think the wounding idea has the best shot, frankly it requires less understanding by doctors of the processes involved, and I still think they are in the twilight zone - if not completely in the dark about how it all works.


#8

Can someone make a possible recipe and HOWTO from the patent ?


#9

» Can someone make a possible recipe and HOWTO from the patent ?

I dont have any time this week to wade through a patent, but the following verbiage makes it obvious that Follica intends to licensce this to dermatologists, hence the “kits” and whatnot. Look at the first little paragraph in particular:

The invention further ]b]features a kit including a composition formulated for topical administration[/b]including (i) a small molecule EGFR inhibitor selected from leflunomide, gefitinib, erlotinib, lapatinib, canertinib, vandetanib, CL-387785, PKI166, pelitinib, HKI-272, and HKI-357; and (ii) an additional biologically active agent selected from an antihistamine, an anti-inflammatory, a retinoid, an anti-androgen, an immunosuppressant, a channel opener, an antibiotic, and an antimicrobial. In one embodiment, the small molecule EGFR inhibitor is gefitinib or erlotinib and the additional biologically active agent is a channel opener selected from minoxidil, diazoxide, and phenytoin.
Any of the above kits can optionally include instructions for applying the composition to the head of a subject (e.g., to the scalp, cheek, chin, lower

face, or eyebrow), for applying the composition to the skin of a subject once or twice daily, for applying the composition to the skin of a subject for at least 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, or even 10 consecutive days, for administering the composition during the night, or administering the composition during the day. The invention features a method for generating a hair follicle or stimulating a hair growth on the skin of a subject by (i) disrupting the skin of the subject (for example, resulting in the induction of reepithelialization of the skin of the subject) and (ii) contacting the cells of the skin with a small molecule EGFR inhibitor, or a metabolite thereof, in an amount sufficient to generate hair follicles or stimulate hair growth on the skin. In certain embodiments, step (a) is performed less than two weeks, 10 days, 8 days, 5 days, or even 3 days prior to step (b). In other embodiments, step (a) is performed simultaneous with, or more than one day, two days, 3 days or one week after step (b). The invention further features a method for generating a hair follicle or stimulating a hair growth on the skin of the head of a subject by (i) contacting the cells of the skin with a small molecule EGFR inhibitor, or a metabolite thereof, in an amount sufficient to generate hair follicles or stimulate hair growth on the skin, wherein the EGFR inhibitor is a non-naturally occurring nitrogen-including heterocycle of less than about 2,000 daltons or a metabolite thereof and with the proviso that the skin is not an eyelid.

The invention also features a method for generating a hair follicle or stimulating a hair growth on the skin of a subject by (i) inducing reepithelialization of the skin of the subject; and (ii) contacting the cells of the skin with an EGFR antibody in an amount sufficient to generate hair follicles or stimulate hair growth on the skin.


#10

I just noticed the subject line…

Guys, there is obviously alot to this patent, and since it hasn’t been tested in humans yet (just human skin grafted onto a mouse), it might be best to at least wait and see what kind of success their trialees have, or at least have a super-thoughrough understanding of the patent before one attempted it at home. What any of us can do will almost certainly not be as good as the kits made by Follica. Read the patent thouroughly and carefully if your going to attempt something like this-------------both of them.

Im glad there is “something else” out there other than cloning DP cells aren’t you? I mean this is probably the only other way to “make” new hair out of thin air. If it doesn’t work, you will be back to waiting for HM and that might be another 10 years for all we know.


#11

The fact that human trials haven’t even begun troubles me.
It’ll be 10 years before trials I,II and III are completed.
So to me, ICX-TRC is still much closer to being available.


#12

follica and the girl in the interview video said something like 2-3 years we have to wait for, even if it works obviously.


#13

» The fact that human trials haven’t even begun troubles me.
» It’ll be 10 years before trials I,II and III are completed.
» So to me, ICX-TRC is still much closer to being available.

Did you just wake up from the dead?

It been beaten to death here…all the ‘ingredients’ in the follica treatment are already FDA approved…so if it works, its on the market. The only problem is making it work and from the NBC interview they seemed very excited about it so I doubt it was a long-term money making plan (ARI, Intercytex?) and they themselves said that it could be out within 2-3 years, implying no trials!


#14

I think you are wrong. Follica messes with the WNT pathway for hair, which is also associated with tumor growth. While it may be true that it won’t be a problem, I don’t see how the FDA will approve a procedure that messes with the WNT pathway without requiring all 3 phases of trials, so as to eliminate that concern.

You can’t just say, yeah, it’s true that the the WNT pathway for hair and tumor formation are related, but really, don’t worry about it. I’m sure it won’t happen. Let’s just release it on the public without testing. I’m sure it will be fine. All the ingredients are already approved!

I also believe Follica is further behind than ICX, mainly for this reason (and I think ICX is years away). I will be very surprised if they avoid any of the FDA trials.


#15

NBC interview… Follica can arrive in the market in next the 3 years .IN NEXT THE 3 YEARS.


#16

Unfortunately that doesn’t mean anything. It’s unlikely to be on the market in 5 years, let alone 3. Time will tell.


#17

» I think you are wrong. Follica messes with the WNT pathway for hair, which
» is also associated with tumor growth. While it may be true that it won’t
» be a problem, I don’t see how the FDA will approve a procedure that messes
» with the WNT pathway without requiring all 3 phases of trials, so as to
» eliminate that concern.

Their procedure doesn’t have to go through the FDA process, so there’s nothing for the FDA to approve.

All Follica is doing is using currently FDA approved drugs off-label. This is done all the time, every day, by docs and clinics all over the country. There’s even a lot of precedent for this in the hair loss biz. When Dr. Lee released his spiro cream, no FDA approval was required. When Dr. Proctor added Phenytion to his cream, no FDA approval was required (despite the fact that Phenytoin has tons of side-effects, some very serious). And when Follica releases their cream with an EGF antagonist (with maybe minoxidil or whatever added to it), no approval will be required (based on off-label usage/precedent), even if they do pre-treat the skin.

Also, these drugs will only be used transiently for a week or two, then stopped. A short exposure time will hopefully limit adverse effects. BTW, a lot of these EGF antagonists are designed to treat cancer – that’s why they are on the market to begin with.

Lastly, if for some reason something bad happens to some patients who have this procedure, Follica may get sued for malpractice, but that’s for them to deal with.


#18

I disagree. I’ll be very surprised if something that messes with the WNT pathway that is implicated in cancer formation doesn’t require FDA approval. I guess we’ll see in time.


#19

» I disagree. I’ll be very surprised if something that messes with the WNT
» pathway that is implicated in cancer formation doesn’t require FDA
» approval. I guess we’ll see in time.

In some embodiments follica does nothing with the wnt pathway whatsoever. They merely apply a egf-receptor blocker, nitric oxide agonists, potassium channel openers, fiberblast growth factors, topical immunosuppressants, and anti-androgens.

I get a kick out of that “messes” with the wnt pathway quote. You do that everytime you scratch yourself. Its part of the wound healing process in anyone. Follica got some hair to grow just by dermabrasion alone, and leaving the wound to heal utterly naturally (by no bandages, ointments, disinfectants of any kind, probably not even soaps). Dermabrasion is legal. EGF-receptor blockers are legal, phenytoin is legal, minoxidil is legal, argninine is legal, fiberblast growth factor is legal, dutasteride is legal. If someone is afraid of lithium being used (better not eat garlic, or use tobacco) or any particular wnt-protien being topically applied, I suppose they can request a kit that doesnt contain them…but they’d be getting less hair. No “stem cell” or cellular injections or “cloned” or “multiplied” cells will be in this procedure or injected into anyone… In fact, no topical has to be used…as all the above can be used internally (including taking garlic supplements for several days post wounding).

I still worry that this will be much much more effective in either the donor area or areas that still have growing hair (in between existing hairs) than in completely bald scalp. I hope Im wrong about that. Even if it does make hair in the front, it will probably have the same genetics as the hair that was originally there…meaning you will need to use finasteride or revivogen or fluridil or whatever anti-androgen in hopes of keeping it.


#20

Come on in here and tell us you know somebody at Follica and that theyv’e already had human trials and it will be available by August or something!!:slight_smile: :stuck_out_tongue: :smiley: :clap: