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Where did all the men go?


#1

They say baldness is an emotional issue but I’ve never encountered such petulance at what may or may not be a setback. Maybe some of you have not had enough adversity or obstacles in life to overcome so if you don’t get what you want when you want it you will stamp your little feet and get really, really angry.

You should read Rudyard Kipling’s IF. Some posters appear to be the mirror opposite of the spirit of that poem which about character and overcoming setbacks.

If TRC doesn’t work, it will be Intercytex employees, directors and shareholders who will suffer most. I’m a shareholder so if TRC doesn’t work, I’ll be a two time loser. I don’t see that as any reason to throw my toys out of the pram.

Intercyex are working dilligently and properly to find a cure. If after all their efforts and investment they can’t do it then so be it. They have no obligation to provide sensitive commercial information to non-shareholders who appear to do no more than sit on their arses an home complaining and demanding.

The Bosley agreement states that Intercytex can’t negotiate with other parties for a period of six months after the completion of phase 2 trials. If Bosley don’t partner Intercytex, there may well be a delay. That’s how it is. If HM becomes available in ten years then that’s when it will be.

You may not be able to grow hair but you can at least grow up. And be a man.


#2

I agree with you in large part.
But I also see where the others are coming from.

“Real Men” lived in harder times in the past and didn’t complain about hair loss the way people sometimes do now. It’s true.

But “real men” also didn’t grow up in a society that is so appearance and youth-centered, where upward mobility & social success is so driven by looks & youth.

I don’t think it’s totally crazy to compare early MPB to the loss of some physical function in past generations. Maybe it’s a large handicap or maybe it’s a small one, but it does at least a little something to a lot of basic things in life.

It’s worth noting that the internet MPB community pulls in and concentrates disproportionate numbers of very young guys with very significant MPB problems. This is definitely not a representative sample of the MPB world at large.

Having visible MPB problems in your early 20s is just not comparable to having a more “normal” dose of visible MPB issues in your 30’s or older. It’s not merely a lack of good looks compared to the norm, it’s being a freak. (At the one age that everyone is really supposed to look hot.)

And I’m not even gonna go into trying to deal with this problem during a guy’s teens.


#3

“But “real men” also didn’t grow up in a society that is so appearance and youth-centered, where upward mobility & social success is so driven by looks & youth.”

Excellent post. That is suitable for framing…


#4

CAL is exactly right, could not have said it better myself. Alec


#5

» Having visible MPB problems in your early 20s is just not comparable to
» having a more “normal” dose of visible MPB issues in your 30’s or older.
» It’s not merely a lack of good looks compared to the norm, it’s being a
» freak. (At the one age that everyone is really supposed to look hot.)
»
» And I’m not even gonna go into trying to deal with this problem during a
» guy’s teens.

Exactly! I’m 26 and NW6…baldness at this age really stands out and everyone noticies/comments on it. Keep in mind I was also Nw2 at about 20…baldness at such early age does takes it toll on a person.

The only reason you seen more men complaining about it is becasue now they can do so online in a private manner.


#6

» CAL is exactly right, could not have said it better myself. Alec

A couple of other points:

Until the 1960’s, most men and women were married with children by their early to mid 20’s, and acted like people today in their 40’s and 50’s.

And MOST IMPORTANT OF ALL: also until the early 1960’s, it was customary for men in America to wear hats, even in big cities.

Now you wear a hat in a city, and people think your either hiding your bald head or trying to make some kind of foolish statement.


#7

» » CAL is exactly right, could not have said it better myself. Alec
»
» A couple of other points:
»
» Until the 1960’s, most men and women were married with children by their
» early to mid 20’s, and acted like people today in their 40’s and 50’s.
»
» And MOST IMPORTANT OF ALL: also until the early 1960’s, it was customary
» for men in America to wear hats, even in big cities.
»
» Now you wear a hat in a city, and people think your either hiding your
» bald head or trying to make some kind of foolish statement.

Clarification: hats were not only customary, but in cities they were pretty much required on any self-respecting man.


#8

» » » CAL is exactly right, could not have said it better myself. Alec
» »
» » A couple of other points:
» »
» » Until the 1960’s, most men and women were married with children by
» their
» » early to mid 20’s, and acted like people today in their 40’s and 50’s.
» »
» » And MOST IMPORTANT OF ALL: also until the early 1960’s, it was
» customary
» » for men in America to wear hats, even in big cities.
» »
» » Now you wear a hat in a city, and people think your either hiding your
» » bald head or trying to make some kind of foolish statement.
»
» Clarification: hats were not only customary, but in cities they were
» pretty much required on any self-respecting man.

The bald mediaeval chronicler, Froissart, bemoaned the new fashion at court, which required men to go without head coverings, and therefore did not “spare the feelings of the bald.”

That was 600 years ago.


#9

» You may not be able to grow hair but you can at least grow up. And be a
» man

I am a man–and more of a man than you’ll ever be in ten lifetimes.

But I’d be a worm if I abandoned my good sense over how I look, to avoid being insulted by self-righteous and rude people like you.


#10

» » » CAL is exactly right, could not have said it better myself. Alec
» »
» » A couple of other points:
» »
» » Until the 1960’s, most men and women were married with children by
» their
» » early to mid 20’s, and acted like people today in their 40’s and 50’s.
» »
» » And MOST IMPORTANT OF ALL: also until the early 1960’s, it was
» customary
» » for men in America to wear hats, even in big cities.
» »
» » Now you wear a hat in a city, and people think your either hiding your
» » bald head or trying to make some kind of foolish statement.
»
» Clarification: hats were not only customary, but in cities they were
» pretty much required on any self-respecting man.

all those old movie with the guys wearing hats, those were the days


#11

Going bald is always an option if you are a good looking dude like him


#12

» » You may not be able to grow hair but you can at least grow up. And be a
» » man
»
» I am a man–and more of a man than you’ll ever be in ten lifetimes.
»
» But I’d be a worm if I abandoned my good sense over how I look, to avoid
» being insulted by self-righteous and rude people like you.

You tell em Ahab. Hell even John Wayne wore a rug and some say you can’t get more “man” than that.


#13

» »
» You should read Rudyard Kipling’s IF. Some posters appear to be the mirror
» opposite of the spirit of that poem which about character and overcoming
» setbacks. This is how I can tell that its you JB, nobody else on the forum would quote Kipling
»
» If TRC doesn’t work, it will be Intercytex employees, directors and
» shareholders who will suffer most. Not really JB, they have other products, and not all of their employees and shareholders are battling MPB, its just another product for them, albeit the one with the biggest payday potential. I’m a shareholder so if TRC doesn’t
» work, I’ll be a two time loser. Hence why you seem very dismissive of Follica and were so of ACELL, this is how you want hair replacement accomplished. I personally dont give a rat’s how its accomplished, I just want it accomplished. If snail slime put on nail scrapes of the skin grew hair…I’d be doing it. I don’t see that as any reason to throw my
» toys out of the pram. None of us play with toys, we have patiently been waiting for information for many years now about the HM technology only to be given the mushroom treatment by Aderans and now face increasing evasiveness from ICX. One photograph of their best responders head would have ceased all complaint and you know it. Mere statistical analysis of their best responder in real haircounts on one particular square inch or few centimeters of scalp would have been ‘enough’ to quell in the inquisitiveness of this board. There is no way that providing that information would have revealed anything about their technique to “competitors”. There are only two competitors out there, and they are definitely behind.»
» Intercyex are working dilligently and properly to find a cure. No, unless they get a partner all research has stopped. They aren’t willing to sink any more money into it, which means that if no party is impressed with the results thusfar, that HM at ICX is dead. If after
» all their efforts and investment they can’t do it then so be it. They have
» no obligation to provide sensitive commercial information to
» non-shareholders who appear to do no more than sit on their arses an home
» complaining and demanding. Sorry, one picture of the top of one man’s head is not “sensitive commercial information”, a haircount of a square inch of a man’s head post HM is not “sensitive commercial information”. No art secrets need be revealed in doing this, and you know it.
»
» The Bosley agreement states that Intercytex can’t negotiate with other
» parties for a period of six months after the completion of phase 2 trials.
» If Bosley don’t partner Intercytex, there may well be a delay. . That’s howVery true, and I might add that if Phoenixbio isn’t interested either, I can’t think of any other entity that would be willing to fool with something like that that has the money to do so. Private HT docs cant, and their arent chains big enough of cosmetic surgeons willing to do it. Bosley is the last large HT-“chain” left. Drug companies almost certainly aren’t going to bite unless the product is pretty good in the NOW…and apparently it isn’t
» it is. If HM becomes available in ten years then that’s when it will be.
»
» You may not be able to grow hair but you can at least grow up. And be a
» man. Im a muscular man who has pumped iron for years, complaining about a indication trial that doesnt reveal ANY statistical or photographic information WHATSOEVER isn’t evidence of childishness, its rational behavior. See my post about my “magic acne cream” that urges people to buy based on my claim that there will be SUBSTANTIAL and VISIBLE reductions in their zits. Sorry, that doesn’t compute.

Want my opinion JB…ICX is still possible, but is a good two to three trials away from having something that is good enough to sell. Aderans might be right in trying to grow hair outside the body. My suggestion, which is still the best one Ive ever seen on this board, of shooting up one’s upper thigh with HM and letting an FUE doc put the hairs that grow up on one’s scalp is the most “can-do” solution that has been proferred that would actually get a product out there that Bosley could deliver that would put more hair on a man’s head than he already has and not simply replant the hairs in a better way. They could do this NOW. It would be pricey, but it would work. The body hair on the leg can be removed beforehand so any hairs that grew would be head hairs. Follica’s patent is very explicit on how they plant to go about hair removal and Im super-confident that will work…so the docs would be moving head hair if it grew.

My truest opinion of the matter, and one that will dissapoint you as a shareholder, is this…Watch Follica’s summer trials. If they dont grow hair, you might as well forget it, and forget the board also. By the time Aderans bought ICX’s research and had a product availed and FDA-approved in the United States where they would be selling it…it would be five years or so AT LEAST. It would be best to get a conservative transplant or just keep it short and forget about it…this includes even bothering reading about it as there are no other “Hair-making” technologies on the horizon. This is it: HM or Follica. There isn’t going to be anything else until gene therapy which is decades away.


#14

Yes, it is very possible that he is James Bond:

-The writing style
-The stupid provocations to the bald people: “you are angry because you are bald, and you attack researchers just because you are angry”.
-Lets remember that Bond defended Bazan, Gho, and Isolagen when all of them had been showed as frauds, mocking all the forum members who dared to attack them.
-Bond always mentions musicians and writers in his posts (I didn’t know he was fond of this particular writer).
-After this important ICX report, if James Bond is not posting with his real nick, is very possible that he is posting under another name.
-Lets remember that James bond was a mentally sick person (he posted about his problem in the past), and it seems that he still is.

Good job, Benji!!!
You are a valuable poster here!!


#15

» Maybe some of you have not
» had enough adversity or obstacles in life to overcome so if you don’t get
» what you want when you want it you will stamp your little feet and get
» really, really angry.
»
» You should read Rudyard Kipling’s IF. Some posters appear to be the mirror
» opposite of the spirit of that poem which about character and overcoming
» setbacks.
»
»
» You may not be able to grow hair but you can at least grow up. And be a
» man.

Baldness is not an obstacle, it is a lifelong disfigurement.

I would rather be dead than be bald. In fact, I wake up every day wishing I was dead. If there is a God in heaven I will drop dead before finishing this post.

I, too, got sucked into the HM hysteria. It became the reason for my very existence. Now I have nothing. I gave up on it around October 2006. I rarely look at hair loss boards any more because I’ve come to the conclusion that there is no hope to be found.

I don’t think it is too much to ask to be able to look like a normal person. I started balding at 14 and I have absolutely no clue what it is like to be a normal guy. None.

I have no idea what it is like to approach a woman with confidence. I have no idea what it is like to go someplace and not have people look at me funny. I have no idea what it is like to go through life without people making jokes or snide comments about my baldness. I have no idea what it is like to not have little kids call me “baldy” and laugh. I have no idea what it is like not to feel embarrassed and ashamed at my appearance. I have no idea what it is like to put on a suit and actually look good.

All I, or anyone else, can ever ask from life is to be given a fair shake. I was not given that. I was cursed to go bald at a young age and be a f*&^%$ freak of nature just like my moron father who cursed me to this hell.

If baldness could be overcome, I would have focused all my energy on it until I overcame it. Obstacles can be overcome. Baldness is not an obstacle. It will never be overcome in my miserable lifetime.

If I could strike a deal and live only one year with a full head of hair, with the cost of the deal being my life at the end of the term, I would gladly take that deal. I would rather live one year of life as a normal looking man than 50 more years as a bald freak.

Hairboy


#16

To illustrate the forum readers about the kind of person that James Bond is, I am going to repost something.

On August last year (2007), an article was published in the media about Isolagen’s regretable practices. This article is still online.

I will copypaste the entire content in a sepparate post.
basically it is the recollection of several patients who paid up to £4,500 for a useless treatment, and now they have engaged into lawsuits against Isolagen. Up to 7000 patients received Isolagen. (Lets remember that a Hairsite member, Baccy, got Isolagen himself and he didn’t notice any improvement).
Here is a quote from the article:

But it was taken off the market in 1999 when it was reclassified as needing a licence. Even now, testing to make sure it is safe and it works has not been completed.

It gets worse. In November 2004 - after Isolagen became available in this country - the six directors of Isolagen Inc in the U.S. allegedly sold their shares in the company for $6.33 (£3.15) each - netting the management $2.5 million (£1.24 million) each.

Legal documents in the U.S., where the biotechnology firm is being sued by investors, suggest the directors boosted the value of the company by making false claims about the effectiveness of Isolagen in Britain. The product was tested in a number of different studies and the results varied widely.

In one case, 73 per cent of the patients responded to the treatment, in another the success rate was only 7.6 per cent. How galling for all the women who lost thousands here in the UK.

The Isolagen laboratories in Park Royal, North London, closed in March. This month, a firm of valuers and auctioneers are preparing all of the company’s equipment for sale.

Isolagen, headed by chief executive Nicholas L Teti, was unavailable for comment, but a posting on its British website insisted the “reason for closure is financial and is not product or safety related”.
<<<<

The Hairsite forum member FrankHair1, was kind enough to post the link, so that we could read it. Here is the thread:

http://www.hairsite.com/hair-loss/forum_entry-id-10556-page-0-category-1-order-last_answer.html

In that thread, James Bond posted his oppinion about the issue. Here it is:

Yeah, so the treatment is not consistent. Thus, some people see benefit and others don’t. This was shown to be the case in their phaseIII trials and is known to be the bane of cell therapy treatments. Dr. Gho also experienced inconsistent results. The difference is that he refused to release it as a treatment because he was smart enough to know that if he did, the people who didn’t respond would put together class action lawsuits and inspire newspaper articles like in the link.

IMO, the people that forked out the money should have researched cell therapy and this treatment before they went under the syringe. Too bad for them that they were too lazy to do that. I say, instead of giving them their money back. Make them sweep the shop floors at Isolagen for 80 hrs. Then call it even.

Dr. Gho’s prophecy of the long line of whiners who pay money but don’t respond turns out to be 100% accurate. I expect no difference even from the 25% of people who respond poorly to HM when it is first rolled out. Here is a tip. You (speaking figuratively; not you personally ) are not paying for hair. You are paying for a procedure that has a chance of giving you hair. It costs the clinic the same to perform the procedure whether you respond or not. Why should the clinic give anybody a free roll of the dice. Casinos don’t give you your money back after your cards come up wrong
<<<<

nice, eh? :wink:


#17

Is the ‘grow your own facelift’ just a con?

By ANNA SEAMAN and PAUL BRACCHI - More by this author » Last updated at 08:49am on 28th August 2007

No more frown lines or facial folds, they said. Wrinkles? There wouldn’t be any. Even scars would miraculously disappear.
Like thousands of women, Julie Stepney, 56, from Bournemouth, believed the hype surrounding ‘revolutionary’ anti-ageing treatment Isolagen.
After all, Dynasty actress Emma Samms was used to promote it, and other celebrities including Tamara Mellon, Linda Barker, and Anthea Turner were said to have tried it.

Frankly, thought Julie, £3,500 - and 144 injections - was a small price to pay to turn back the clock. So, too, was the swelling which would leave her looking as if she had tangled with a swarm of bees.
Alas, it was all for nothing. When Julie looked in the mirror, the same face she had always had was staring back at her - with the same sagging jawline and crow’s feet.
“I didn’t expect to look like a 20-year-old,” she said. "But after forking out thousands of pounds, I expected some sort of results."
We now know that Julie was a ‘guinea pig’ for a product that was unproven and unregulated. In America, the company behind Isolagen was forced to withdraw it from the U.S. market shortly before its launch in the UK four years ago after the Federal Drugs Agency (FDA) expressed concerns over its scientific trials.
Julie was unaware of this. So was Patricia Bailey from West London, Josephine Campbell from Dorset and Mary Johnson from North Yorkshire.
As the Mail reported yesterday, Julia Hall from Kent was also so disgusted by the lack of results after spending her life savings on two courses of the treatment that she set up a campaign group.
Now up to 50 members are suing the company in a class action for breach of duty and misrepresentation. They hope to receive at least £5,000 each.
In Britain, it is still unclear whether Isolagen should be considered a beauty treatment or medical procedure, which is why it went on sale here - helping to make making millions for the manufacturers - but not in America where there is a stricter assessment regime.
The lawyers call it a “grey area”; Julie and all the other “guinea pigs”, who were left financially disadvantaged and emotionally distraught, call it a scandal.
It is too early to say if there will be any long-term side-effects such as bloating or disfigurement, which could take years to emerge, according to the British Association of Aesthetic Plastic Surgeons.
“No surgeon who is a member of our organisation would consider using this procedure until there are fully documented facts about its safety and effectiveness,” said a spokesman.
However Isolagen is not the only non-surgical cosmetic procedure to come under the spotlight in recent times. The consumer group Which? revealed recently that 415,000 people undergo non-surgical cosmetic procedures in Britain each year.
Yet many of the substances used on these patients have never been approved in other countries and, as a result, women are being put at risk or ripped off by clinics and beauty parlours.
Already, lip implants culled from cadavers in the U.S. are available in London and “placenta shampoo” (harvested from a selection of new mothers in the U.S.) and anti-wrinkle gel containing an ingredient from the foreskin of a circumcised baby - the tissue cells of which were replicated in a laboratory - can be purchased with a few clicks of a computer mouse.
What a Frankenstein’s monster the beauty industry has become.
Isolagen itself would not be out of place in a sci-fi movie. It’s a technique sometimes referred to as the “grow your own facelift” programme.
A tiny sample of skin is taken from behind your ears. Collagen-promoting cells are culled from the sample and cultivated in a petri dish before being injected into the areas of concern.
Over time, the transplanted cells, full of the body’s natural proteins, are supposed to rejuvenate the skin. Or, at least, that was the claim.
Isolagen was marketed ruthlessly in Britain as an alternative to Botox and had instant appeal. First, it did not require botulism to be injected into your face (Botox is a trade name for the botulinum toxin); and second, the benefits would last much longer - “18 to 20 months in most patients”.
Representatives from the U.S. biotechnology firm which invented the treatment held “introduction evenings” up and down the country; there were promotional videos and glossy brochures and a laboratory was opened in North London.
Soon Isolagen was being offered at scores of clinics. As many as 7,000 patients paid up to £4,500 in the hope of reversing the ageing process.
One of them was 37-year-old Julia Hall. She read about Isolagen in a celebrity magazine last year. “I visited the Isolagen website and read testimonials from burns victims whose lives had been transformed,” said Julia, who had suffered with terrible acne scarring on her cheeks since she was a teenager.
"I was really excited. I thought I’d finally found an answer. I told my partner about it and we decided to spend the money we’d been saving to buy a house.
"I wanted treatment for my acne scars and my partner, who is a little older, wanted to address the wrinkles in his ageing skin."
Both Julia and her partner subsequently had two sets of injections, in September and October, which cost £9,000. They were told they might not see any benefits for six months; six months later, however, the ugly scarring remained. Julia went back to the Harley Medical Group in London and asked for her money back.
“I was told, rather curtly, that on rare occasions the treatment does not work,” said Julia, from Orpington in Kent.
"They pointed out that I had signed a disclaimer, so the money would not be refunded.
"I was furious and upset. We had spent our life savings on something we thought was pretty much a dead cert. I just couldn’t understand. If I was such a rare case, then why had my partner not noticed any difference in his appearance either?"
In fact, Julia and her partner were far from alone. By this time, scores of other women had suffered a similar experience. Like Julia, widow Patricia Bailey, 57, visited the respected Harley Medical Group back in 2005.
“I’m not the sort of person with money to burn,” she said. "But I felt treatment would boost my selfesteem, so I borrowed nearly £3,000 from my mother. I went back three times over a year to have my neck, mouth, forehead and around my eyes done at Harley Street.
"It was a humiliating process. I was shuffled from room to room having needles poked into me and people taking photographs of me. To make matters worse, my face swelled hugely and it was very painful. I couldn’t bite down on food properly for a week after the injections."
Patricia asked for her money back. The clinic refused. Did the Harley Medical Group know about the controversial background surrounding Isolagen?
“It is proven therapy for reducing frown lines, facial folds, wrinkles around the eyes, vertical lines around the lips and scars caused by acne, chicken pox or trauma,” boasted the promotional literature.
Would Julia and Patricia have parted with thousands of pounds if they had been aware that Isolagen had still to receive approval in the U.S.? The technique was first used on American women in 1996 - when it did not fall within the jurisdiction of the FDA.
But it was taken off the market in 1999 when it was reclassified as needing a licence. Even now, testing to make sure it is safe and it works has not been completed.

It gets worse. In November 2004 - after Isolagen became available in this country - the six directors of Isolagen Inc in the U.S. allegedly sold their shares in the company for $6.33 (£3.15) each - netting the management $2.5 million (£1.24 million) each.
Legal documents in the U.S., where the biotechnology firm is being sued by investors, suggest the directors boosted the value of the company by making false claims about the effectiveness of Isolagen in Britain. The product was tested in a number of different studies and the results varied widely.
In one case, 73 per cent of the patients responded to the treatment, in another the success rate was only 7.6 per cent. How galling for all the women who lost thousands here in the UK.
The Isolagen laboratories in Park Royal, North London, closed in March. This month, a firm of valuers and auctioneers are preparing all of the company’s equipment for sale.

Isolagen, headed by chief executive Nicholas L Teti, was unavailable for comment, but a posting on its British website insisted the “reason for closure is financial and is not product or safety related”.
That will come as little consolation to Julia Hall who has now formed the Isolagen Support Group. The group has 50 members and is “growing every day”.
They are now considering following the example of Julie Stepney, who, took the National Slimming Centre in Bournemouth - where she underwent Isolagen treatment, to the small claims court to recoup her money after the treatment didn’t work.
The centre has now refunded the money she had spent on Isolagen with interest. The payment, which included court costs, totalled £4,000.
The Harley Medical Group, however, would not comment on individual cases or whether it knew Isolagen had not been approved in the U.S., insisting: "Any patient concerns are always followed through with careful attention in compliance with the Healthcare Commission standards."
Among the members in the support group is Josephine Campbell, 57, who was given the treatment by her dentist. “I’ve been with the same dentist for most of my adult life, so I trusted him implicitly,” explains Josephine.
"When he offered me the treatment he had just been to an Isolagen introduction and was really impressed. He showed me fantastic before and after shots of women in their mid to late 60s who looked visibly younger after treatment.
"I thought it was dubious at first but then he said he was treating his wife at the same time, so I figured he must really think it was a good thing.
"The appeal for me was that it was very gradual - not like a surgical face lift where I would have to deal with comments from the friends and neighbours. This was supposed to work over time.
"So, telling my husband I had a business meeting, I went to the dentist’s practice in Bournemouth and paid £4,000 for treatment. I wondered why it was done at the dentist but he assured me the cell regeneration technology could be used all over the body and was particularly popular on receding gums.
"Reassured, I had the cell sample taken. Twelve weeks later it was reinjected into my face and neck. I suffered from bad swelling and couldn’t return home for three days. When I did, I was devastated to see no difference at all.
"My dentist was really understanding. He said that his wife hadn’t noticed a difference either and he had contacted Isolagen. They had said that occasional cases do not respond.
"I knew then I’d been the victim of hype."
Douglas McGeorge, president of the British Association of Aesthetic Plastic Surgeons, described Isolagen’s claims that it ‘rejuvenated’ the skin as ‘nonsense’ and said the product was ‘completely oversold’. He said it was no more than ‘an expensive biological filler’ used to plump out wrinkles.
But it is difficult to avoid the conclusion that clinics, and not just the men behind Isolagen, failed women like Julie, Julia, Josephine and Patricia, who says: "What they did to me and everyone else who spent good money on this useless treatment, was sell false dreams.
“They preyed on the vulnerable and lonely. I am angry and upset and to be honest - even if I do get my money back, it won’t take away from how cheated I feel.”


#18

» I would rather live one year of life as a normal
» looking man than 50 more years as a bald freak.

I am you thirty years later, and you couldn’t be more right!


#19

your problem is you like to play the victim

we all have a cross to bear in life…is all you have to offer people…yourself with a full head of hair…or your wish that this were so?

all of us hate the fact we lost or are losing our hair. It would be great to have a magical cure, I am sure it would make a lot of our lives happier, including mine.

Lets assume for one minute that there will never be a cure for baldness or thinning hair. Then we are left with what we look at in the mirror in the morning. The question is, what do we have to offer the world.

Sure I wear a hat when i go to the mall, but I walk outside my house with none, and I really do not care what people think Perhaps this is because I am older and have adjusted to my hair. But this is also a good thing. I certainly was not this way in my 20s. People in their 20s tend to overreact to thinning hair, and they catch more funny comments about it…oh you are thinning now and you are only 20 whatever years old. I had that at age 21, it sucks big time.

I do think though, that we have something to contribute to the world and we can be happy productived citizens, good fathers and husbands, successful in our careers. We just have to mostly get over our own obsession with ourselves and our own personal appearance. If others percieve us as totally devastated by our thinning hair, they will razz us about it, that makes it worse. If however they feel that it is ok with us and we are comfortable in our own skins, they in turn will be happy with us also.

I say lets stop focusing on our hair, and feeling sorry for ourselves. there are a lot worse things in life than thinning hair, and if this is your biggest problem you have to deal with you are fortunate. How would you deal with being in a wheelchair. Cancer? stroke? Not too good I think.

Sure thinning hair sucks, but lets not make it worse by criticising ourselves and ruining our own lives. You have a lot to offer to the world, thinning hair or not.


#20

update:
It seems that Monty and James Bond are not the same person.
My appologies for both.

Benji somehow got confused about the relationship between Rudyard Kipling and JB.

more here:
http://www.hairsite.com/hair-loss/forum_entry-id-24961-page-0-category-1-order-last_answer.html