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What if?


#1

I have read that icx experiments involve neogenisis of hair follicles. And from my understanding, this means growing a completely new hair follicle where none existed before. As well as rejuvinating existing ones.
So what is it that signals the cells to turn into hair? And, what if the cells, after being instructed to evolve into a hair folicle, migrates through tissue or blood to a part of the body where you don’t want hair? What keeps the cells from moving systemically? Is it possible that hair could grow in your throat, or lungs, or heart?
Do we really know the implications of neogenisis? What if the cells turn into some other organ other than hair? Can the signaling of cells be controlled, reliably?


#2

Jesus … that really is a scary thought!!!


#3

» Jesus … that really is a scary thought!!!

OMG I agree !!


#4

Good question. The short answer is that, in order to create an HM follicle, you need a lot more than just one stray donor follicular cell to be present in one area. If a cell somehow migrates through a blood vessel to another part of the body (and this could theoretically happen, by entering through spaces in the wall of a capillary – though it would be rather unlikely, I think), you would coincidentally have to have a very significant number of donor cells all migrating through the same route, at the same time, to the same place. The odds of this happening would probably be billions to one.

A single donor DP cell, by itself, could never give rise to a new follicle. The reason the new follicles are created is that large numbers (tens or hundreds of thousands) of donor follicular cells are being injected all together, and they all end up very close together, coalescing to form a follicle. A single HM injection will consist of a fluid medium, with tens of thousands of inductive dermal papilla cells floating in it.

Don’t think of these HM donor cells as magic bullets which can create new hairs anytime, anywhere. Rather, they are worthless alone, and only have the power to create new follicles when thousands of them are grouped together in one microscopic area.

The signalling can be controlled very reliably – in fact, it is self-controlling. That’s because DP cells are already differentiated cells. They are not stem cells, which are undifferentiated (pluripotent) cells which can literally turn into almost any kind of specialized somatic cell. Since DP cells are already firmly on the track of becoming components of hair follicles, there is no danger that these are “rogue” cells that have a mind of their own and can veer off onto some bizarre, unforeseen route, creating a “teratoma” (such as human teeth growing in skin, or something wild like that.) If anyone tells you that’s a real danger with HM, they’re talking science fiction.


#5

Considering that the injected cells are derived from donor dp cells it makes sense that they could not become anything other than hair.
Regarding the issue of cell migration: I’m not sure I feel completely at ease with the prospect of it being a possibility, regardless of how remote the chances.
Perhaps if I was more educated in biology I wouldn’t have such an active imagination.


#6

» Good question. The short answer is that, in order to create an HM
» follicle, you need a lot more than just one stray donor follicular cell to
» be present in one area. If a cell somehow migrates through a blood vessel
» to another part of the body (and this could theoretically happen, by
» entering through spaces in the wall of a capillary – though it would be
» rather unlikely, I think), you would coincidentally have to have a very
» significant number of donor cells all migrating through the same route, at
» the same time, to the same place. The odds of this happening would
» probably be billions to one.
»
» A single donor DP cell, by itself, could never give rise to a new
» follicle. The reason the new follicles are created is that large numbers
» (tens or hundreds of thousands) of donor follicular cells are being
» injected all together, and they all end up very close together, coalescing
» to form a follicle. A single HM injection will consist of a fluid medium,
» with tens of thousands of inductive dermal papilla cells floating in it.
»
» Don’t think of these HM donor cells as magic bullets which can create new
» hairs anytime, anywhere. Rather, they are worthless alone, and only have
» the power to create new follicles when thousands of them are grouped
» together in one microscopic area.
»
» The signalling can be controlled very reliably – in fact, it is
» self-controlling. That’s because DP cells are already differentiated
» cells. They are not stem cells, which are undifferentiated (pluripotent)
» cells which can literally turn into almost any kind of specialized somatic
» cell. Since DP cells are already firmly on the track of becoming
» components of hair follicles, there is no danger that these are “rogue”
» cells that have a mind of their own and can veer off onto some bizarre,
» unforeseen route, creating a “teratoma” (such as human teeth growing in
» skin, or something wild like that.) If anyone tells you that’s a real
» danger with HM, they’re talking science fiction.

Its nice to come to hairsite and read the unadulterated non-frizzy factual scientific truth


#7

My only concern is what effects (if any) the multiplication process will have on the cells themselves in the long term .Is it possible for these cells to grow into something dangerous (cancer) at a later date??