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What are you waiting for?


#1

It’s quite incredible how people on this forum are paying attention only at those things which belong to the future…jahoda, nigam and all things like that are 10 years far at least. What s your daily regime for fighting mpb? What do u think about the products which are known to be released in few years like CB (hopefully)? Pgd2 theory for this forum seems to be something belonging already to the past…
I know that this message sounds like a critici but it’s not…i just want to know why we discuss only about things we could test in 2020 at least…


#2

Ale, in case you haven’t noticed, this is the “Hair Multiplication and Stem Cells Treatment Forum”. It’s a forum that was set up to concentrate specifically on research, new treatments, scientific advancements, and cutting-edge technologies.

If you want to talk about people’s “daily regimens”, I suggest you go to one of the many forums on conventional treatments. They are here on HairSite and also all over the internet.

I’m serious, check it out, buddy: there are forums on Topicals, All Natural Treatments, and Drugs right here on HairSite. Why don’t you go over there right now?


#3

Roger understood what u said however u just focused on my two words daily regime while i was mentioning even cb or pgd2.

For example qhat do u think about replicel:

http://www.ieson.com/topic.asp?whichpage=1&TOPIC_ID=60262&#668953


#4

C’è stato un Problema

Devi essere iscritto per entrare in questo forum


Non sono iscritto, allora…

Ale, I just think you need to be more patient. Any of the research we’re discussing here could give us a major breakthrough soon. We just don’t know.

For us to get caught up in that “it’s 20 years away” stuff, at this point, is really stupid fatalism.

I am not a fatalist, I want to learn about new discoveries every day!

As for Replicel, the only objective data from trials results we have from them was quite poor. It is possible that Dr. McElwee has identified the best cells to use (dermal sheath cells), but is culturing them in such a way that they lose most of their trichogenicity.

I’m not a fatalist, but I’m not going to bet too much money on Replicel. It seems that if they haven’t figured out some fundamental issues like this by now, they may be stuck “behind the curve”.


#5

Roger, the link is this:
Stem cell technology used in search for the holy grail of hair treatments: a cure for baldness


#6

[quote][postedby]Originally Posted by Davide_G[/postedby]
Roger, the link is this:
Stem cell technology used in search for the holy grail of hair treatments: a cure for baldness[/quote]

Thanks.


#7

Yep Roger maybe you’re right…sometimes we are caught by the “10 years away fear” so we are not in the position to focus on the new researches in the proper way. I really hope that something new and that works hits the market :slight_smile:


#8

With the speed at which Dr. Nigam is trying new things I think we could get new opportunities soon. New information is coming to light, plus were also taking a 2nd look at old information, and I get the sense that there is a possibility of some breakthrough in the near term. I’m not sure of course because there are unanswered questions but there appears to be some things that may be taking shape. Examples of old information getting a 2nd look include the following:

  1. The hanging drop method that Jahoda used to improve genetic expression is about 100 years old and had been all but abandoned in favor of 2d lab dishes.

  2. Allograft cell treatments were basically utilized merely as proof of concept but now some of us are starting to wonder if perhaps allograft cell transfers could be used as a breakthrough treatment since allograft transfers might eliminate the need for time-consuming cell culture which results in loss of inductivity.

Over the coming months we will see how useful these ideas may be. Also, Dr. Nigam is looking at other ideas, such as a new gf, to enhance results.

I don’t think we are looking at 10 years anymore. Theoretically, allograft cell transfers could be done today but we need to find out if if the hairs express the characteristics of the donor or host and if the hairs more closely resemble the characteristics of the donor then can we get the hairs to resemble the characteristics of the host?

There are some questions that need to be answered and some testing that needs to be done.


#9

[quote]Theoretically, allograft cell transfers could be done today but we need to find out if if the hairs express the characteristics of the donor or host and if the hairs more closely resemble the characteristics of the donor then can we get the hairs to resemble the characteristics of the host?

There are some questions that need to be answered and some testing that needs to be done.[/quote]

I’m not that bothered if the allograft hairs aren’t a perfect match to my own hair. For me, that issue is secondary to getting my coverage restored.

The big issue with allograft transfer is the legality and logistics of actually setting this up. You’re talking as if someone can just open up an allograft clinic tomorrow in New York.

THIS WILL NOT BE APPROVED IN THE USA OR EUROPEAN UNION. It won’t be approved in any Western country.

Someone is actually going to have to test this offshore in some low-regulation country, and then, if it works according to expectations, they would open a clinic. I doubt if this would even be legal in India.

It makes no sense to keep on talking about allografts if the practical logistics and legality can’t be addressed.

Either someone finds a safe haven which will allow it, or this is a dead issue.


#10

If it can’t be tested in Europe then how did Jahoda get permission to test it over a decade ago?


#11

[quote][postedby]Originally Posted by jarjarbinx[/postedby]
Do you think Jahoda had to go through all kinds of hoops to do the small experiment that he did on his wife?[/quote]

No, I think he probably had to go through no hoops, because it was clearly done for experimental purposes and he had his wife’s consent.

The point is that no clinic in the US, Canada, UK, Australia, or any other Western country is going to be allowed to sell this procedure to patients. There’s a big difference between one man putting cells in his wife’s arm for experimental purposes, and a clinic treating patients who are paying for allograft transfers.


#12

so then clinics might be allowed to do it on an experimental basis???


#13

[quote][postedby]Originally Posted by jarjarbinx[/postedby]
so then clinics might be allowed to do it on an experimental basis???[/quote]

A few very carefully selected researchers might be able to get approval to do this on an experimental basis. I’m only speculating here, in fact I don’t even think it’s “likely” – it’s just “possible”. However, there is no way these doctors or clinics will get permission to try to restore entire heads of hair. If they get approval at all for experiments, it’ll just be for small test patches.


#14

One thing I am finding interesting about this situation is how the ball is bouncing around in research.

Over a decade ago when he did his experiment he was the big news story, right???

And then he went dark for over a decade and now all of a sudden he’s the big news story again.

During that more than a decade period when Jahoda was relatively silent was he not doing hair cell research? What happened to him from like 1999 - 2012 when he was not making news?


#15

He didn’t completely go dark. I believe he was still a professor at the University of Durham, and was also consulting for Intercytex or on their scientific advisory board.


#16

[quote][postedby]Originally Posted by roger_that[/postedby]
He didn’t completely go dark. I believe he was still a professor at the University of Durham, and was also consulting for Intercytex or on their scientific advisory board.[/quote]

And since he’s now starting to make research news again does this mean that intercytex is dead and he needs to go back to the drawing board so he can make cell transplants work and then get involved with another intercytex-like company using whatever new research he discovers over the next years of research?


#17

I’m confident that they would at least be allowed to do patch-testing and I also think that Dr. Nigam can too because he said that India should accept other countries testing that’s already been done and since Johoda (and perhaps others) have done some early allograft cell testing) that means that Dr. Nigam might also be able to do some patch testing involving allografts.

Roger_that I just want a cure. I don’t care if it’s an allograft or an autograft. I just want a cure. Aren’t you sick of this yet?