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Topical green tea extract works......PATENT from GILLETTE


#1

http://www.freepatentsonline.com/EP0814754.html

It does indeed work…and here is proof. Number one Gillette wouldn’t take out a patent if it didn’t, and there are experiments they have done to prove it.

"Male intact Golden Syrian hamsters are considered acceptable models for human beard hair growth in that they display oval shaped flank organs, one on each side, each about 8 mm. in major diameter, which grow thick black and coarse hair similar to human beard hair. These organs produce hair in response to androgens in the hamster. To evaluate the effectiveness of a particular catechin compound, or mixture of catechin compound, the flank organs of each of a group of hamsters are depilated by applying a thioglycolate based chemical depilatory (Surgex). To one organ of each animal 10-25 µ l. of vehicle alone once a day is applied, while to the other organ of each animal an equal amount of vehicle containing a catechin compound is applied.

After thirteen applications (one application per day for five days a week), the flank organs are shaved and the amount of recovered hair (hair mass) from each is weighed. Percent-reduction of hair growth is calculated by subtracting the hair mass (mg) value of the test compound treated side from the hair mass value of the vehicle treated side; the delta value obtained is then divided by the hair mass value of the vehicle treated side, and the resultant number is multiplied by 100.

The above-described assay will be referred to herein as the “Golden Syrian hamster” assay. Preferred compositions provide a reduction in hair growth of at least about 35%, more preferably at least about 50%, and most preferably at least about 70% when tested in the Golden Syrian hamster assay.

The mixture of catechins isolated from green tea leaves as described previously were tested in the Golden Syrian hamster assay. The mixture caused a dose dependent reduction of hair growth in the range of 46-91%. The mixture was tested at a 5, 10, 20 and 30% dose. The results are presented in Table 1.

Epigallocatechin (EGC), epigallocatechin gallate (EGCG), epicatechin (EC), and epicatechin gallate (ECG), purified as described previously, also were tested in a Golden Syrian hamster assay. The results are presented in Table 2. Among the four catechins, epigallocatechin gallate was found to be the most potent. The hair growth reductions ranged from 58 to 81%. In a dose response study, this compound was found to be quite effective even at a 1% concentration, which produced a 53% hair growth reduction"

Here is how they did it…

Their preparation:
"Epicatechin, epicatechin gallate, epigallocatechin, epigallocatechin gallate were isolated from green tea leaves according to the procedure described by R. Agarwal et al., Cancer Research 52:3582-3588 (1992), with some modification. Dried green tea leaves were extracted with hot water at 80°C. under nitrogen. The hot water extraction was repeated twice. The residual leaves were further extracted with 80% ethanol by gently agitating at 25-30°C. on a horizontal shaker at 125 rpm for 1 hr. The water and the ethanol extracts were combined. The hydro-alcoholic (water-ethanol) extract was treated with chloroform to remove caffeine and pigments. The chloroform layer was separated from the hydro-alcoholic layer using a separatory funnel. The latter fraction was extracted three times under nitrogen with ethyl acetate. The ethyl acetate layer was separated and subjected to rotary evaporation to remove the organic solvent. The residue was dissolved in water and freeze-dried. This resulted in an off-white to slightly yellow dried residue of green tea polyphenols (GTP). The total yield of the polyphenolic fraction was 10.3%. The percent composition of individual polyphenol component in the mixture was determined on a reverse-phase HPLC system. The HPLC analysis revealed four major catechin components in the mixture: epigallocatechin (4.6%), epigallocatechin gallate (69.6%), epicatechin (6.7%) and epicatechin gallate (19.1%).

The individual catechin components were further purified on a preparative reverse phase HPLC system. The freeze-dried GTP’s fraction was dissolved in water, and loaded on to a 40 x 300mm C-18 reverse phase column. The catechin compounds were eluted from the column using a gradient elution with water (adjusted to pH 4.4 with formic acid) and ethanol. The column eluent was collected at 1 min intervals HPLC fractions containing purified epigallocatechin, epigallocatechin gallate, epicatechin, and epicatechin gallate (as verified using analytical reverse phase system) were pooled and freeze-dried.

The catechin compound preferably is incorporated in a topical composition which includes a non-toxic dermatologically acceptable vehicle or carrier which is adapted to be spread upon the skin. Examples of suitable vehicles are acetone, alcohols, or a cream, lotion, or gel which can effectively deliver the active compound. One such vehicle is disclosed in co-pending application PCT/US93/0506A. In addition, a penetration enhancer may be added to the vehicle to further enhance the effectiveness of the formulation.

The concentration of the catechin compound in the composition may be varied over a wide range up to a saturated solution, preferably from 0.1% to 40% by weight or even more; the reduction of hair growth increases as the amount of the catechin compound applied increases per unit area of skin. A catechin compound can be used in purified form or as a mixture; for example the mixture of catechin compounds isolated from green tea leaves as previously described can be used without further purification. The maximum amount effectively applied is limited only by the rate at which the catechin compound penetrates the skin. Generally, the effective amounts range from 100 to 3000 micrograms or more per square centimeter of skin.

The composition should be topically applied to a selected area of the body from which it is desired to reduce hair growth. For example, the composition can be applied to the face, particularly to the beard area of the face, i.e., the cheek, neck, upper lip, and chin. The composition can also be applied to the legs, arms, torso or armpits. The composition is particularly suitable for reducing the growth of unwanted hair in women suffering from hirsutism or other conditions. In humans, the composition should be applied once or twice a day, or even more frequently, for at least three months to achieve a perceived reduction in hair growth. Reduction in hair growth is demonstrated when the frequency of hair removal (shaving, tweezing, depilatory use, waxing) is reduced, or the subject perceives less hair on the treated site, or quantitatively, when the weight of hair removed by shaving (i.e., hair mass) is reduced. Benefits of reduced hair removal frequency include convenience and less skin irritation. "

Personal note. As many of you know, Ive been trying topical homemade green tea extract on one side of my face to see if it will reduce hair. I haven’t even been doing it a month yet, but the beard on my right cheek is weaker, smaller in circumference, and lighter colored than on my left when I look close. I can also feel the difference when I run my hand down each side. I think I have found the topical anti-androgen Ive been looking for to add to my internal finasteride. Im going to call it a day on further research on a topical anti-androgen. I really think this one is sufficient


#2

Systematic “anti-correlation” between body (or facial) hair and scalp hair has proved to be inadequate more than once. Just consider the dubious effects of estrogenes on scalp hair whereas their anti body hair effects seem reliable. The same goes for the antiandrogenic effects of spiro on skin while its benefit are elusive, at best, hairwise.


#3

have read recently one of your posts stating gr tea is not good, though black is? and i beleive this study is to reduce hair growth? why use it as topicall? please explane. i value your posts, and am thankfull

http://www.freepatentsonline.com/EP0814754.html
»
»
» It does indeed work…and here is proof. Number one
» Gillette wouldn’t take out a patent if it didn’t, and there are
» experiments they have done to prove it.
»
»
» “Male intact Golden Syrian hamsters are considered acceptable models for
» human beard hair growth in that they display oval shaped flank organs, one
» on each side, each about 8 mm. in major diameter, which grow thick black
» and coarse hair similar to human beard hair. These organs produce hair in
» response to androgens in the hamster. To evaluate the effectiveness of a
» particular catechin compound, or mixture of catechin compound, the flank
» organs of each of a group of hamsters are depilated by applying a
» thioglycolate based chemical depilatory (Surgex). To one organ of each
» animal 10-25 µ l. of vehicle alone once a day is applied, while to the
» other organ of each animal an equal amount of vehicle containing a
» catechin compound is applied.
»
» After thirteen applications (one application per day for five days a
» week), the flank organs are shaved and the amount of recovered hair (hair
» mass) from each is weighed. Percent-reduction of hair growth is calculated
» by subtracting the hair mass (mg) value of the test compound treated side
» from the hair mass value of the vehicle treated side; the delta value
» obtained is then divided by the hair mass value of the vehicle treated
» side, and the resultant number is multiplied by 100.
»
» The above-described assay will be referred to herein as the “Golden Syrian
» hamster” assay. Preferred compositions provide a reduction in hair growth
» of at least about 35%, more preferably at least about 50%, and most
» preferably at least about 70% when tested in the Golden Syrian hamster
» assay.
»
» The mixture of catechins isolated from green tea leaves as described
» previously were tested in the Golden Syrian hamster assay. The mixture
» caused a dose dependent reduction of hair growth in the range of 46-91%.
» The mixture was tested at a 5, 10, 20 and 30% dose. The results are
» presented in Table 1.
»
» Epigallocatechin (EGC), epigallocatechin gallate (EGCG), epicatechin (EC),
» and epicatechin gallate (ECG), purified as described previously, also were
» tested in a Golden Syrian hamster assay. The results are presented in
» Table 2. Among the four catechins, epigallocatechin gallate was found to
» be the most potent. The hair growth reductions ranged from 58 to 81%. In a
» dose response study, this compound was found to be quite effective even at
» a 1% concentration, which produced a 53% hair growth reduction”
»
»
» Here is how they did it…
»
» Their preparation:
» "Epicatechin, epicatechin gallate, epigallocatechin, epigallocatechin
» gallate were isolated from green tea leaves according to the procedure
» described by R. Agarwal et al., Cancer Research 52:3582-3588 (1992), with
» some modification. Dried green tea leaves were extracted with hot water at
» 80°C. under nitrogen. The hot water extraction was repeated twice. The
» residual leaves were further extracted with 80% ethanol by gently
» agitating at 25-30°C. on a horizontal shaker at 125 rpm for 1 hr. The
» water and the ethanol extracts were combined. The hydro-alcoholic
» (water-ethanol) extract was treated with chloroform to remove caffeine and
» pigments. The chloroform layer was separated from the hydro-alcoholic layer
» using a separatory funnel. The latter fraction was extracted three times
» under nitrogen with ethyl acetate. The ethyl acetate layer was separated
» and subjected to rotary evaporation to remove the organic solvent. The
» residue was dissolved in water and freeze-dried. This resulted in an
» off-white to slightly yellow dried residue of green tea polyphenols (GTP).
» The total yield of the polyphenolic fraction was 10.3%. The percent
» composition of individual polyphenol component in the mixture was
» determined on a reverse-phase HPLC system. The HPLC analysis revealed four
» major catechin components in the mixture: epigallocatechin (4.6%),
» epigallocatechin gallate (69.6%), epicatechin (6.7%) and epicatechin
» gallate (19.1%).
»
» The individual catechin components were further purified on a preparative
» reverse phase HPLC system. The freeze-dried GTP’s fraction was dissolved
» in water, and loaded on to a 40 x 300mm C-18 reverse phase column. The
» catechin compounds were eluted from the column using a gradient elution
» with water (adjusted to pH 4.4 with formic acid) and ethanol. The column
» eluent was collected at 1 min intervals HPLC fractions containing purified
» epigallocatechin, epigallocatechin gallate, epicatechin, and epicatechin
» gallate (as verified using analytical reverse phase system) were pooled
» and freeze-dried.
»
» The catechin compound preferably is incorporated in a topical composition
» which includes a non-toxic dermatologically acceptable vehicle or carrier
» which is adapted to be spread upon the skin. Examples of suitable vehicles
» are acetone, alcohols, or a cream, lotion, or gel which can effectively
» deliver the active compound. One such vehicle is disclosed in co-pending
» application PCT/US93/0506A. In addition, a penetration enhancer may be
» added to the vehicle to further enhance the effectiveness of the
» formulation.
»
» The concentration of the catechin compound in the composition may be
» varied over a wide range up to a saturated solution, preferably from 0.1%
» to 40% by weight or even more; the reduction of hair growth increases as
» the amount of the catechin compound applied increases per unit area of
» skin. A catechin compound can be used in purified form or as a mixture;
» for example the mixture of catechin compounds isolated from green tea
» leaves as previously described can be used without further purification.
» The maximum amount effectively applied is limited only by the rate at
» which the catechin compound penetrates the skin. Generally, the effective
» amounts range from 100 to 3000 micrograms or more per square centimeter of
» skin.
»
» The composition should be topically applied to a selected area of the body
» from which it is desired to reduce hair growth. For example, the
» composition can be applied to the face, particularly to the beard area of
» the face, i.e., the cheek, neck, upper lip, and chin. The composition can
» also be applied to the legs, arms, torso or armpits. The composition is
» particularly suitable for reducing the growth of unwanted hair in women
» suffering from hirsutism or other conditions. In humans, the composition
» should be applied once or twice a day, or even more frequently, for at
» least three months to achieve a perceived reduction in hair growth.
» Reduction in hair growth is demonstrated when the frequency of hair
» removal (shaving, tweezing, depilatory use, waxing) is reduced, or the
» subject perceives less hair on the treated site, or quantitatively, when
» the weight of hair removed by shaving (i.e., hair mass) is reduced.
» Benefits of reduced hair removal frequency include convenience and less
» skin irritation. "
»
»
»
»
» Personal note. As many of you know, Ive been trying topical homemade green
» tea extract on one side of my face to see if it will reduce hair. I haven’t
» even been doing it a month yet, but the beard on my right cheek is weaker,
» smaller in circumference, and lighter colored than on my left when I look
» close. I can also feel the difference when I run my hand down each side. I
» think I have found the topical anti-androgen Ive been looking for to add to
» my internal finasteride. Im going to call it a day on further research on a
» topical anti-androgen. I really think this one is sufficient


#4

Sure…it shows that green tea is a good anti-androgen if you can get it to the correct depth in the dermis.

ECGC probably inhibit receptor sites by either blockage or downregulation a great deal, thus keeping body hair from getting the male hormones it needs to grow properly. Hamster hair is apparently androgen dependent, thus why Gillette was testing on it, looking for anti-androgens. I dont think Gillette, a large company, would bother taking out a patent like this for something that didn’t work, so we probably have a good topical we can make at home here.

Furthermore, Green tea apparently INCREASES growth of SCALP HAIR beyond its anti-androgeic effects:

1: Phytomedicine. 2007 Aug;14(7-8):551-5. Epub 2006 Nov 7. Links
Human hair growth enhancement in vitro by green tea epigallocatechin-3-gallate (EGCG).Kwon OS, Han JH, Yoo HG, Chung JH, Cho KH, Eun HC, Kim KH.
Department of Dermatology, Seoul National University College of Medicine, Laboratory of Cutaneous Aging and Hair Research, Seoul National University Hospital, Institute of Dermatological Science, Seoul National University, 110-744 Seoul, Republic of Korea.

Green tea is a popular worldwide beverage, and its potential beneficial effects such as anti-cancer and anti-oxidant properties are believed to be mediated by epigallocatechin-3-gallate (EGCG), a major constituent of polyphenols. Recently, it was reported that EGCG might be useful in the prevention or treatment of androgenetic alopecia by selectively inhibiting 5alpha-reductase activity. However, no report has been issued to date on the effect of EGCG on human hair growth. This study was undertaken to measure the effect of EGCG on hair growth in vitro and to investigate its effect on human dermal papilla cells (DPCs) in vivo and in vitro. EGCG promoted hair growth in hair follicles ex vivo culture and the proliferation of cultured DPCs. The growth stimulation of DPCs by EGCG in vitro may be mediated through the upregulations of phosphorylated Erk and Akt and by an increase in the ratio of Bcl-2/Bax ratio. Similar results were also obtained in in vivo dermal papillae of human scalps. Thus, we suggest that EGCG stimulates human hair growth through these dual proliferative and anti-apoptotic effects on DPCs.

PMID: 17092697 [PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE

and green tea appears to exhibit some inhibition of prostaglandin D2, which is inflammatory and mentioned in a hairgrowth patent as of late:

From PubMed:"
1: Prostaglandins Leukot Essent Fatty Acids. 2004 Jul;71(1):25-31. Links
Antiplatelet effect of green tea catechins: a possible mechanism through arachidonic acid pathway.
Son DJ, Cho MR, Jin YR, Kim SY, Park YH, Lee SH, Akiba S, Sato T, Yun YP.
College of Natural Sciences, Soonchunhyang University, Asan 336-745, South Korea.

We have previously reported that green tea catechins (GTC) showed an antithrombotic activity, which might be due to antiplatelet effect rather than anticoagulation. The present study was performed to investigate the effect of GTC on the arachidonic acid (AA) metabolism in order to elucidate a possible antiplatelet mechanism. GTC inhibited the collagen-, AA- and U46619-induced rabbit platelet aggregation in vitro in a concentration-dependent manner, with IC50 values of 61.0+/-2.5, 105.0+/-4.9 and 67.0+/-3.2 microg/ml, respectively. Moreover, GTC administered orally into rats inhibited the AA-induced platelet aggregation ex vivo by 46.9+/-6.1% and 95.4+/-2.2% at the doses of 25 and 50 mg/kg, respectively. [3H]AA liberation induced by collagen in [3H]AA incorporated rabbit platelets was significantly suppressed by GTC compared to the control. GTC also significantly inhibited the thromboxane A2 (TXA2) and prostaglandin D2 (PGD2) generations induced by addition of AA in intact rabbit platelets. GTC significantly inhibited TXA2 synthase activity in a concentration-dependent manner. Moreover, adenosine triphosphate (ATP) release from dense granule was inhibited by GTC in washed platelets. These results suggest that the antiplatelet activity of GTC may be due to the inhibition of TXA2 formation through the inhibition of AA liberation and TXA2 synthase. Copyright 2004 Elsevier Ltd.

PMID: 15172681 [PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]"

I bought some green tea extract from a reputable dealaer (alot of folks like that beyondacentury.com, I think I got mine from Natures Way or GNC…I’d have to go to the kitchen to look), I mixed it to what is about the solubility limit with PURIFIED water, then added a similar volume of pure grain alcohol from a local liquor store. This was Bryan’s old suggestion in making it yourself. Ive been putting it on one side of my face (right cheek) for about one month and have already noted weaker, thinner beard hair there of lighter color. That cheek is dry too, very, very little oil at all. In the experiments, they noted three months time was when one would really note the effects and they were suggesting you could apply twice a day. One could probably make some HOMEMADE VERY STRONG green tea (3-4 times stronger than what you would drink) and come up with a decent percentage of catechins therein. However, you’d have to brew yourself. Over-the-counter ready made teas (black and green) hardly have any catechins and flavonoids from the processsing compared to the slow, homebrewed real thing (brew slowly over about ten minutes on a lower boil to really extract the good stuff from the leaves if you do that).

Black tea internally reduced DHT in mice by 72%, probably via flavonoids therein, and might be a good alpha five type two inhibitor. Another patent for a component of black tea mentioned that it inhibits TGF-beta, a negative growth factor in hair DP cells. Green tea has been shown to inhibit type ONE alpha five in experiments, but not type two. Topically it must block receptors or affect their cell cycles for such an anti-androgenic effect. Some natural compounds apparently get altered in human digestion and lose some of their androgenic potency. Saw Palmetto is probably one of these because it doesnt effect serum DHT in experiments, but in test tubes apparently does as Hangininthere posted a while back in the HM forum (even though he can be annoying).


#5

» Sure…it shows that green tea is a good anti-androgen if you can get
» it to the correct depth in the dermis.
»
» ECGC probably inhibit receptor sites by either blockage or downregulation
» a great deal, thus keeping body hair from getting the male hormones it
» needs to grow properly. Hamster hair is apparently androgen dependent,
» thus why Gillette was testing on it, looking for anti-androgens. I dont
» think Gillette, a large company, would bother taking out a patent like
» this for something that didn’t work, so we probably have a good topical we
» can make at home here.

Shouldn’t letting it set on your head for hours or overnight do the trick as far as absorption? If you could make it into a viscous liquid that will dry on the scalp? I usually leave turmeric in overnight when I can… it seems to work better the longer I leave it in.


#6

» Green tea has been shown to inhibit type ONE
» alpha five in experiments, but not type two.

EGCG inhibits both forms of 5a-reductase, it’s just more potent against type 1 than it is against type 2.

» Topically it must block receptors or affect their cell
» cycles for such an anti-androgenic effect.

I assume you’re referring to that hamster study of various polyphenols, curcumin, GLA, etc., which showed that topical EGCG had a 97% inhibition of DHT-stimulated flank-organ growth. That’s an amazing result, all right, but it’s SOOO amazing I’d like to see somebody else duplicate it! :slight_smile:

.


#7

» Shouldn’t letting it set on your head for hours or overnight do the trick
» as far as absorption? If you could make it into a viscous liquid that will
» dry on the scalp? I usually leave turmeric in overnight when I can… it
» seems to work better the longer I leave it in.

Because EGCG is highly water-soluble, if you’re going to experiment with topical green tea (or a derivative) on your scalp, I STRONGLY recommend that you take advantage of the hydration effect by applying it to your skin/scalp when it’s as thoroughly hydrated as possible. Water-soluble substances in general have more difficulty in penetrating the skin, and hydration in particular probably enhances that penetration of water-soluble substances through the skin more than it does fat-soluble substances, so put it to good use with green tea!! :ok:

.


#8

» http://www.freepatentsonline.com/EP0814754.html
»
»
» It does indeed work…and here is proof. Number one
» Gillette wouldn’t take out a patent if it didn’t, and there are
» experiments they have done to prove it.
»
»
» "Male intact Golden Syrian hamsters are considered acceptable models for
» human beard hair growth

Get Real!!!


#9

would adding the contents of green tea extract capsuls in emu oil work? also that stuff is green, i am thinking it might discolor the scalp


#10

» also that stuff is green, i am thinking it might discolor the scalp

In that case you better shave all your hair off and use plenty.