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TE in men


#1

Do men also suffer from telogen effluvium?
If so why no one is discussing about it here in this forum?

( I could see only women talking a lot about it in the women’s forum)


#2

» Do men also suffer from telogen effluvium?
» If so why no one is discussing about it here in this forum?
»
» ( I could see only women talking a lot about it in the women’s forum)

how do you define TE in comparison to male pattern baldness? What is the difference?


#3

I have lost much more hair (10:1 or more) to stress-related TE than I have ever lost to AGA. I am utterly convinced of this. This is evidenced by the fact that I have lost a majority of my MATURE (hairs that have grown to full length for many cycles) GRAFTED hairs to stress. If even 50% of my transplanted hairs were still growing, I would not be here.


#4

No doctor knows how to treat hair loss so they probably invented this term TE so that they can calm the patients and send them home. In reality it is just male and female pattern baldness.


#5

I dont agree with you.

Some of the salient features of TE are -

  1. It is fully reversible

  2. There are just more hair follicles in a resting state than there should normally be.

  3. TE not only affects scalp but also can affect other areas, like the eyebrows or pubic region.

  4. Miniaturization is not there

» No doctor knows how to treat hair loss so they probably invented this term
» TE so that they can calm the patients and send them home. In reality it is
» just male and female pattern baldness.


#6

» I dont agree with you.
»
» Some of the salient features of TE are -
»
» 1. It is fully reversible

Fully reversible in how many months usually? What is the best way to find out if one has TE or not?


#7

You are waaaaaaaaaaaaaaaay off here. TE is very real. So, when a women experiences hair loss following a pregnancy, is that genetic? When someone not genetically predisposed to hair loss loses a lot of hair following a traumatic event, is that genetic hair loss? I don’t think so. Do a simple Google search and you will find some very reputable sites with a lot of information on TE. Stress has A LOT more to do with hair loss than people think, IMO. I went through some severe stress over a three-month period about two years ago. At that time, I lost approximately 60% to 70% of my hair in a month or so - transplanted hair and hair on the lower sides and back of my head (in the “safe” zone). If you think that is genetic hair loss, then you do not know dick about hair loss. Genetic hair loss takes place over many YEARS where an individual hair grows smaller and smaller until it is only vellous. Genetic hair loss is NOT loss of a mature, healthy hair that suddenly falls out and never grows back.


#8

» You are waaaaaaaaaaaaaaaay off here. TE is very real. So, when a women
» experiences hair loss following a pregnancy, is that genetic? When someone
» not genetically predisposed to hair loss loses a lot of hair following a
» traumatic event, is that genetic hair loss? I don’t think so. Do a simple
» Google search and you will find some very reputable sites with a lot of
» information on TE. Stress has A LOT more to do with hair loss than people
» think, IMO. I went through some severe stress over a three-month period
» about two years ago. At that time, I lost approximately 60% to 70% of my
» hair in a month or so - transplanted hair and hair on the lower sides and
» back of my head (in the “safe” zone). If you think that is genetic hair
» loss, then you do not know dick about hair loss. Genetic hair loss takes
» place over many YEARS where an individual hair grows smaller and smaller
» until it is only vellous. Genetic hair loss is NOT
» loss of a mature, healthy hair that suddenly falls out and never grows
» back.

so your hair did grow back to the way it was before the TE loss? How many months did it take before they all grew bk?


#9

Unfortunately, I cannot say that all of it grew back. I guesstimate that I maybe got 50% back. My “donor” areas are quite thin now. Before the stressful events, My hair in these areas was very thick - thick to the point that you could not see scalp even when cut very short. Now, there are areas of my scalp that look like a 70 y.o. man’s hair.


#10

Problem with TE is that it is not accurately described from a medical point. Jtelecom points to stress as a possible cause and pregancy in women as a possible other. In the latter, TE could be described as a provisional hormonal imbalance affecting hair whereas MPB is a permanent one. So, we’re back to someone else’s comment in this thread. With such a generic term, inapt to determine an accurate diagnosis, TE allows many docs to send back their patients saying: “wait a little, all this will turn out OK soon”… leaving them at los(s)t.


#11

The effects of acute TE lasts for about 6 months after which regrowth can be seen.
In chronic TE it may take longer.

» » I dont agree with you.
» »
» » Some of the salient features of TE are -
» »
» » 1. It is fully reversible
»
» Fully reversible in how many months usually? What is the best way to find
» out if one has TE or not?


#12

brm:

Your post is quite accurate. My point being that all “hair loss” cannot be neatly packaged into a term of “genetic hair loss”. There are a myriad of conditions out there that either exacerbate “genetic” hair loss or cause hair loss outright. If I had retained even 50% of the hairs that I have had transplanted over the past ten years, I would not feel the need to visit this site or seek any kind of additional treatment. Something other than genetics has claimed my hair. This I guarantee.


#13

I fully sympathize with you Jtel. I had HT myself 3 times and deemed it not worth the spending after all. My regimen since has gained me much more hair than those three pricey stripsessions in spite of the sexual sides. I would be deeply grieved if I had lost HT new hairs. You seem positive about the fact that these transplanted bulbs have not been taken from evolutive areas of your scalp, i mean areas not immune to DHT… If the shed was sudden, you have it right.


#14

Thanks, brm. What is your current regimen?


#15

My regimen is incredibly heavy (I swallow up to 45pills a day):
Maxi hair
Cod liver oil
Salmon oil
Borage/onager oil
Paba
Gingko
Spirulina
Green tea
Brewer’s yeast
Maca
Ginseng
MSM
Biotin
sesame seeds
Ho shou wuh
Blackstrap molasses

Nettle root 600mg
1/2 proscar

Essential oils 2x a day
Minox 15 2x a day
revivogen 2x a day
folligen three times a week

On washing:
Amla powder and oil (gives curly hair)
coconut oil (gives curly hair)
apple cider vinegar
revivogen conditioner

Truth to speak my whole regimen collapses everytime I try to ease on proscar. In february, stepping down from 2.5mg to 2mg made me shed up to 400 hairs a day. Since I’ve been back on 2.5mg, I regained everything I had lost and nettle root has potentiated the overall effect. I am currently sheding 80 hairs/day which is very, very little in my case.


#16

OMG! That is a lot of stuff. Yeah, the massive sheds are quite disheartening, to say the least. Can you single out a couple of things n your regimen that you believe are vital to your success? Thanks for posting your regimen. I must say that i thought that you were going to post one or two things and Propecia.


#17

I found the following article to be a good and relevant one for this discussion.

Distinguishing AGA From Chronic TE when associated in the same patient

A Simple Noninvasive Method

Alfredo Rebora, MD; Marcella Guarrera, PharmD; Manuela Baldari, MD; Federica Vecchio, MD

Arch Dermatol. 2005;141:1243-1245.

Background
Distinguishing chronic telogen effluvium (CTE) from androgenetic alopecia (AGA) may be difficult especially when associated in the same patient.

Observations
One hundred consecutive patients with hair loss who were clinically diagnosed as having CTE, AGA, AGA + CTE, or remitting CTE. Patients washed their hair in the sink in a standardized way. All shed hairs were counted and divided “blindly” into 5 cm or longer, intermediate length (>3 to <5 cm), and 3 cm or shorter. The latter were considered telogen vellus hairs, and patients having at least 10% of them were classified as having AGA. We assumed that patients shedding 200 hairs or more had CTE.

The statistic revealed, however, that the best concordance between clinical and numerical diagnosis ( = 0.527) was obtained by setting the cutoff shedding value at 100 hairs or more.

Of the 100 patients, 18 with 10% or more of hairs that were 3 cm or shorter and who shed fewer than 100 hairs were diagnosed as having AGA;

34 with fewer than 10% of hairs that were 3 cm or shorter and who shed at least 100 hairs were diagnosed as having CTE;

34 with 10% or more of hairs that were 3 cm or shorter and who shed at least 100 hairs were diagnosed as having AGA + CTE; and

14 with fewer than 10% of hairs that were 3 cm or shorter and who shed fewer than 100 hairs were diagnosed as having CTE in remission.

Conclusion
This method is simple, noninvasive, and suitable for office evaluation.


#18

Since adding netle root and gingko, I think I have seen a noticeable improvement. Don’t forget I hold an as accurate as possible counting of my hair loss rate.
The most useless (at best) thing I have ever tested is topical spironolactone (for 18 months).
The linchpin remains 1/2 proscar. Seeing how effective nettle root seems to be Imay consider again lowering my daily fin intake and make it up with more nettle root or throw pygeum and/or SP in there. I would never drop minox. This stuff protracts a hair’s life and I can often single out what I call “minox generation hairs” in my comb: they are very thick, very brown and have a funny multi ondulating shape, like an accordeon’s.
Frequency of washing (that I vary from 3 days to sometimes 9 -10 days) has proved to be completely irrelevant.


#19

THANKS for posting this! I am ABSOLUTELY CERTAIN that I have AGA with Chronic Telogen Effluvium (CTE). I had no idea that anyone had even studied the combination and I have never heard of the term CTE - it certainly fits me. Thanks, again.