Home | News | Find a Doctor | Ask a Question | Free

Reactivate Stems cells


#1

#2

“Sales of AIVITA’s skin care products support its clinical development program, including a platform cancer immunotherapy.”

I don’t believe a lot of what they’re saying. They tout themselves as a “biomedical” company, but it seems to be more of cosmetics company using a lot of high tech language and biochemical terms to sell skin care products.

Yes, it’s true stem cells have to be activated to get hair growth. But we’ve heard all this kind of talk before, especially from other cosmetics manufacturers like L’Oreal and others: “microenvironments”, “healthy growth and maintenance”, etc. They hire a lot of PhDs and MDs, but will they really submit any New Drug Applications to the FDA, or are they just going to sell cosmetics that slightly alter the chemical environment of your scalp?


#3

Alpha-2-HS Glycoprotein (fetuin). Is this the main molecule that supposedly triggers stem cell activation? One of their products facial serum has that in the formula.


#4

I think lactate would probably be more reliable. Alpha-2-HS Glycoprotein is abundant in the fetus, but that doesn’t necessarily mean it is “the” molecule which triggers stem cell activation. Some people might be making this association, but have they proved it? If some cosmetic company is putting this in their facial creams, and it’s known that this is the molecule responsible for activating stem cells, then regrowing lots of hair would be just as simple as rubbing their over-the-counter cosmetic lotion on our scalps, right? This sounds like typical cosmetic company hype.

My money is on increasing intracellular lactate production… Some people on another forum are starting to just apply a lactate solution as a topical. Don’t know if that idea will work, but if the goal is to reactivate stem cells, then anything that increases lactate levels in the vicinity of the HFSCs should do it.

I see the people behind this company have written an article about Fetuin and call it a “revolutionary cosmetic ingredient”. Really weird to have a “scientific” article use that wording in its title…