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Re: "Growth and Patience"


#1

"Growth and Patience (Hair Transplant)
posted by Pats205, 12.04.2009, 16:36

Hey everyone,

Its vital that guys considering a HT understand that you are not going to get the full result until 16-18 months at least…

I think everyone needs to be made aware that even after a whole year there is still a great deal more in store - more growth, thickening and maturing."

Not so.

Between 8-10 months max is the time that what you see is bascially what you get.

And, if you haven’t had any growth 6 months out from a procedure do not fool yourself into thinking you are just a slow grower.

With very rare exceptions, none that I have even seen thus far, if you do not see any new growth 6 months out something is wrong.

Maybe there are some out there but I haven’t seen a single case presented in which one had no growth at 6 months, and then 6 months later bammo, full result.

Feel free to present an example of a case you are aware of in which this has happened.

Also, I would like to see pictures of a case in which at 12-18 months there is a dramatic difference in coverage when compared to 8-10 months.


#2

All,

There is a great deal of ignorance about technical aspects of HT – the fundamental facts. The (ludicrous) idea that any HT is “done” at 12 months has exasperated me.

Let me explain to all why this absurd notion exists. Although it is true that the yield is largely complete at 12-16 months, this has stunningly little to say about the final appearance of the plant.

Why? I mean, if I have virtually all my yield – isn’t that it, aren’t we done?

No. And here’s why. Newly transplanted hair is traumatized. It requires many full cycles until it has achieved its full thickness in the recipient area.

And nothing is more important for coverage, and thus the basic cosmetic effect of the plant, than hair caliber. Period.

forhair . com /Articles / Hair_Mass_Index_and_Hair_Mass_Transferred_2 . htm

I’ve seen the most significant increases in net coverage value per hair years after my first 4 HT’s.

It is fascinating how much the years will do to increase the coverage value of HT hair.

TheFittest

nb. too bad time will not increase the number or value of the grafts in the donor. This disgusting fact means that HT remains a very dubious procedure indeed. Nothing has changed…


#3

If you have some cases in point I would be interested in viewing photographs of a dramatic dfference in coverage of a bald area at even the 12-14 month mark versus the 8-10 month mark.

And/or examples of instances where at the 24 month mark there is a dramatic difference versus the 12 month mark.

Since everyone knows that it’s the norm for hair tranplants to take 18-24 months to achieve the full result examples should not be hard to produce.


#4

Forget pictures of HT. See patients in-person. If you have not seen many HT heads in person, in daylight sun and wind, you know nothing about HT, esp. if you don’t have HT on your head.

And I’m not the best guy to ask for “pics.” :wink:

The caliber of each HT hair thickens over a period of years, and this is what makes a crucial difference in coverage value.

If you want to grasp the truth of the statement above, you will need to see and, ideally, feel HT hair in-person. There is no other way. No “pics” no “vids.” In-person, daylight, no nonsense.

TheFittest


#5

» Forget pictures of HT. See patients in-person. If you have not seen many
» HT heads in person, in daylight sun and wind, you know nothing about HT,
» esp. if you don’t have HT on your head.
»
» And I’m not the best guy to ask for “pics.” :wink:
»
» The caliber of each HT hair thickens over a period of years, and this is
» what makes a crucial difference in coverage value.
»
» If you want to grasp the truth of the statement above, you will need to
» see and, ideally, feel HT hair in-person. There is no other way. No
» “pics” no “vids.” In-person, daylight, no nonsense.
»
»
» TheFittest

That’s true, but pictures will give someone a general idea.


#6

This is the first time I’ve heard of such a theory, how come doctors don’t talk about this ever?


#7

Keepitshorter,

When you say:

» That’s true, but pictures will give someone a general idea.

I have to tell you: pictures are only helpful when one has already seen many plants in-person. What follows is an excerpt from a post I wrote years ago – I hope it’s of interest:


Before my first transplant, I relied on pictures. I thought that photographs could give me a very good idea of results. I felt it was enough to be aware of obvious problems: the use of flash, different pre and post op hairstyles, subtle use of concealers like Toppik or Dermatch, flattering angles, etc. I thought that good pictures – and indeed there are good pictures on the net (e.g. Jotronic’s H&W work) – would certainly show me what I needed to know. I was wrong.

A few months after my first procedure I decided to call transplant doctors in the NYC metro area, and ask to meet with some of their finished patients. I was surprised at how many HT practices and patients there are – and how relatively few were willing to meet. But even relatively few adds up after some months. I saw more than 20 patients in person over a 9 month period. I had a definite plan. First, if they were agreeable, I had them send me photos online. I wanted to make a comparison between these photos and my in-person impressions. Second, I wanted to avoid the agenda-laden hyperaware patients from boards like these, and although I did wind up seeing quite a few patients from well-known doctors, for the most part these were friendly non-obsessive types willing to share results and experiences for the price of a few drinks. I don’t believe any patient I met with posts on any HT board; I asked them all, and they all said no. A few were fascinated by the idea. Some sent pictures taken by their doctors; some had taken their own photos, videos, etc. Out of the 18 patients who agreed to send me photos, 7 of the transplants looked good or even excellent based on the photographs. None of these were obviously doctored photos, although almost all of them were taken with flash.

The upshot. I was shocked by the appearance of these patients in daylight. Without exception, all of the patients had hair that was essentially see-through. Only one patient looked passable to me. He had had 4 strip procedures and estimated his total at over 6500 grafts. He had ideal hair characteristics according to his doctor and I could see that was true. Coarse, curly dark hair on an olive complexion. It did not look good by any means, but he didn’t look especially balding. All the other patients did. I would never criticize someone’s HT, esp. as they were kind enough to meet with a stranger and show me the work. So, I reacted positively to all of them and we soon wound up speaking about things other than hairloss. They were all good guys – this hairloss bullsh*t brings out the best in some people, oddly enough. All of them were so polite that no one even asked me to take off my cap. Most assumed I was just a guy with hairloss thinking about getting HT. I never told anyone I had gone to Cole.

The 7 photos I had initially found acceptable shared two things in common. They all had their hair brushed straight back, Patrick Riley style, and they all had relatively more grafts than the other 11 patients with obviously disappointing photos. None of the patients had work done before 1998, and most of the work was done in the last 3 years.

My point. Although 20 patients isn’t a great sample size, here are my conclusions. HT photos, even those taken under ideal conditions, are outrageously misleading. Texture of the hair, lay of the hair, fatal unnatural subtle flaws of a hairline – you simply cannot see these in photos. And broad daylight is a killer. If you are serious about HT, make sure you see patients in person. Nothing – nothing is more important. Finally, if you want a result that even vaguely stands up to a sunny windy day, make sure before you take the plunge that you have your expectations and hair characteristics in line. I’m afraid even the best HT prospects are going to wind up batting .250 in most cases. Get tons of grafts. You’ll need every one for that bright sunny day.

TheFittest


#8

» This is the first time I’ve heard of such a theory, how come doctors don’t
» talk about this ever?

It is not theory; it is fact. HT has the longest waiting period for results of any cosmetic procedure. If doctors explained that the full coverage value of the HT might not be realized for 18-24 months, and sometimes longer than that, they would have a lot less meat in the seats.

Again. The yield of a plant – that is – how many grafts survived the surgery – will be almost entirely realized after 12-16 months. The full coverage value from each graft will not be attained until these follicles cycle many times in the unfamiliar chemical stew of the recipient area.

That’s that.

TheFittest


#9

» » This is the first time I’ve heard of such a theory, how come doctors
» don’t
» » talk about this ever?
»
» It is not theory; it is fact. HT has the longest waiting period for
» results of any cosmetic procedure. If doctors explained that the full
» coverage value of the HT might not be realized for 18-24 months, and
» sometimes longer than that, they would have a lot less meat in the seats.
»
»
» Again. The yield of a plant – that is – how many grafts survived the
» surgery – will be almost entirely realized after 12-16 months. The full
» coverage value from each graft will not be attained until these follicles
» cycle many times in the unfamiliar chemical stew of the recipient area.
»
» That’s that.
»
» TheFittest

It sounds good on paper but hard to prove. Having said that, I have to admit that sometimes my hair feels really thick and then months later it thins out considerably, I do think it may have something to do with the growth cycles of the follicles.


#10

Fittest:

Thanks for the enlightening post.

You are certainly correct in that one better get as many grafts as he or she possibly can for those bright sunny days.

That’s why I said a photo will give only a general idea, for the HT educated person.

There are a few of the photos and cases presented here that in my opinion, and I think yours and many others’ also, there is simply NO WAY that the person got the coverage with the number of grafts that some of the AFTER photos depict.

Tricks, different angles, gimmicks, differing lighting, WET before and DRY after and many other methods are used to make it appear the result is better than it actually is.

There is no way that 3500 grafts completely restores, to the extent depicted in a photo on this forum, in a balding case presented here recently.

Only with a large number of grafts and a minimum area of balding can you resotre to the fullest extent possible to make it appear, in real life, as if a person never had any hair loss–expecially as you noted, on a bright sunny day.

You certainly do not see any clinics taking any after photos in the bright sunlight, nor WET after photos, and the reasons should be obvious.


#11

Hello,

I was always told that it takes more than 18 months to see full results because the transplanted hair stays in a dormant phase for quite some time. Look at babies, some babies have little to no hair for the first year and then a whole head comes in. I guess it’s all about time and the thickening and maturing of hair. Don’t get me wrong, I’m no scientist by any means, just my opinion.

Gabriel