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Pilox vs Nagam


#1

Nigam: desperately posts crappy pics for a year.

Pilox: has the best pics we’ve ever seen, which were put online in a mistake/leaked fashion, and then promptly asked to be taken down by the pilox company.

Hmm… who’s more likely to have a cure? Who’s more likely to have snakey oils?

Honestly? The ironic thing is nigam is the perfect person to rip-off this pilox stuff.

copper ions, zinc ions, and some sort of lazer tatoo removal… BOOM

Damaging skin create new follicles
Copper ions stimulate them to grow
Zinc ions block dht.

Nigam, get to work.


#2

ACTION MECHANISMS / PROOFS OF EFFECTIVENESS

Zinc is a powerful 5α-reductase inhibitor [2, 3]. This enzyme catalyzes the conversion of androgens into DHT (dihydrotestosterone), which fixes on to the receptors located on the sebaceous glands. This fixation brings about sebum production. By inhibiting this enzyme, zinc alleviates hyperseborrhea.

In vivo tests have confirmed this action in zinc [2]. Measurement of sebum production on the skin’s surface during topical treatment containing zinc shows a reduction in the quantity of sebum produced.

Moreover, zinc ions exert an anti-inflammatory action. Indeed, on keratinocyte cultures, zinc reduces activation of these same cells. It reduces the production of TNF-α and maintains cell viability [4].

In vitro, zinc brings about a reduction in oxidative stress. It is therefore part of the large family of antioxidants. Firstly, it is thought to form mercaptides with the thiol groups in the protein membranes, thus preventing the formation of free radicals with other metal ions. In addition, it is thought to maintain the activity and structure of superoxide dismutase. Finally, it is thought to increase the concentration of metallothioneins, which destroy free radicals [5].

Zinc is also known for its antiseptic activity. Studies have been conducted on cultures of microorganisms such as E. Coli, S. Aureus and C. Albican. These show that zinc has the ability to inhibit bacterial and fungistatic proliferation [1].

Finally, a cicatrizing action has been shown [6, 7].

OUR EXPERT’S OPINION

As a 5-α-reductase modulator, zinc is well known and established. It also has an antimicrobial activity, which is variable, however, depending on the form of salt used and its associations (copper, for example).

Its recommendation for acne-prone oily skin is customary.

Its availability continues to be an issue. “Organic” salt forms are preferable to mineral salts. Salicylate, acetate and gluconate are the ones most generally used.

Owing to its chelating character, zinc may also interact with certain formula excipients (free doublets like hydroxyls) and find itself trapped in complexes that have to be exchanged in the biological environment. As a precautionary measure, this should therefore be confirmed by testing.

A concentration of 3% could be interesting for its gluconate form. However, we must have a measured expectation on the activity obtained in the short term in all cases. Used on its own, it is more of a background modulator (oily skin). Good, fast effectiveness in acne requires its combination with, at the very minimum, a keratolytic like salicylic acid.

BIBLIOGRAPHICAL REFERENCES

[2] Effect of a topical erythromycin-zinc formulation on sebum delivery. Evaluation by combined photometric-multi-step samplings with Sebutape. Pierard GE and Pierard-Franchimont C, Clinical and Experimental Dermatology, 18(5):410-413. 1993.

[3] Inhibition of 5α-réductase activity in human skin by Zinc and azelaic acid. Stramatiadis D et al, British Journal of Dermatology,119(5): 627-632. 1988.

[4] Protective effect of Zinc on keratinocyte Activation markers induced by interferon or nickel. Gueniche A, Acta Derm Venereol,75(1): 19-23. 1995.

[5] Antioxidant-like properties of Zinc In Activated Andothelial Cells. Hennig B and McClain GJ, Journal of the American College of Nutrition, 18(2):152–158. 1999.

[6] Zinc in wound healing : theoretical, experimental and clinical aspects. Lansdown ABG et al, Wound rep reg, 15(1):2-16. 2007.

[7] In vitro modulation of keratinocyte wound healing integrins by zinc, copper and manganese. Tenaud I et al, British Journal of Dermatology, 140,(1):26-34. 1999.


#3

[quote]copper ions, zinc ions, and some sort of lazer tatoo removal… BOOM

[/quote]

Really hate to be nit-picky, but can you spell “laser” correctly, for a start?


#4

LOL!!!

[quote]copper ions, zinc ions, and some sort of lazer tatoo removal… BOOM

[postedby]Originally Posted by roger_that[/postedby]

Really hate to be nit-picky, but can you spell “laser” correctly, for a start?[/quote]


#5

Translation #1: Pilox has the best pics ever so it has to be legit.

Translation #2: Pilox works so let’s steal it from the developers/owners.

LOL! Do you ever think before you talk?

Hey needhairasap if you are right about Pillox being legit then it’s a bad idea to approach this issue with the idea of trying to steal it from the developers. Your approach is all wrong. If the treatment is legit we should approach this with the idea of being respectful and conduct ourselves honestly and in good faith.

[quote][postedby]Originally Posted by needhairasap[/postedby]
Nigam: desperately posts crappy pics for a year.

Pilox: has the best pics we’ve ever seen, which were put online in a mistake/leaked fashion, and then promptly asked to be taken down by the pilox company.

Hmm… who’s more likely to have a cure? Who’s more likely to have snakey oils?

Honestly? The ironic thing is nigam is the perfect person to rip-off this pilox stuff.

copper ions, zinc ions, and some sort of lazer tatoo removal… BOOM

Damaging skin create new follicles
Copper ions stimulate them to grow
Zinc ions block dht.

Nigam, get to work.[/quote]


#6

@ Needhairasap,

Man, I can not get over how disrespectful you are. You want to steal from Pilox and you talk to Dr. Nigam like he’s your servant. And you think you are able to determine whether or not I can handle discussion between researchers and us. LOL!!!

The bad photos at Nigam’s site are years old as I understand it. He claims an associate did it without his knowledge. I have no reason to doubt him, however he is responsible for whatever pics go on his site. It’s my understanding that he’s taken responsibility, assured that it won’t happen again, and assured that he will be personally involved in picture taking from then on. To my understanding there have been NO photo-shopped pics in some time now.

There have been complaints about the black-and-white photos but his explanation is true if you look at the originals, which are actually more favorable to him than the black and white pics. He says he made them black and white because the coloration was different in the before pics after pics and he was concerned that, that would annoy some viewers. Let’s face it, with the way we pick apart his photos he has a valid point.

There have been complaints about the photos Dr. Nigam recently shared. A few posers have stated that they are actually two different people rather than the same person in the before and after photos. BS. Those photos are of the same person.

It looks to me like Dr. Nigam is keeping his promise to give us better pics. Are they perfect? No. But I have confidence that I can tell what is going on, on the person’s head in his recent photos.

One last issue about past photo-shopping on Dr. Nigam’s site, it does seem like there is a lot of photo-shopping going on among virtually all HT doctors. So if others are doing it and he doesn’t do it then he puts himself at a competitive disadvantage.

I believe that Dr. Nigam is really trying to produce an effective treatment for hair loss. But we aren’t sure if cell therapy can produce the breakthrough results (even when combined with growth factors, SHH, and repeat treatments) that we want. There may be reasons that it just won’t work. Or perhaps the last hurdle is protecting trichogenicity. And perhaps someone (Maybe Dr. Nigam?) will find the key to solving that problem. I have no doubt that Dr. Nigam is trying.

On the issue of Pillox:

I can’t say yet if they’re legit or not. I need more information. There are things about the Pillox situation that appear questionable but there are also things about it that seem legit. We need someone to talk with the developers and gather some facts and some answers to some questions. We have plenty of info about Dr. Nigam, but if you stop and think about it we have very little info about Pillox.