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New Study! - Green Tea Extract Topically Grows Significant Hair


#1

Green Tea Extract Grows Hair in Vitro and in Vivo

We’ve all heard about how Asians drink lots of green tea and usually have full heads of hair. Does this mean green tea improves hair growth?

Despite all the positive news about the health benefits of green tea, in my opinion the jury is still out on this one. Surprisingly, not a lot of studies have been done on green tea and hair growth in humans, especially when the green tea is topically applied.

In a recent study about green tea and human hair follicles, Kwon et al. report:

Green tea is a popular worldwide beverage, and its potential beneficial effects such as anti-cancer and anti-oxidant properties are believed to be mediated by epigallocatechin-3-gallate (EGCG), a major constituent of polyphenols.

Recently, it was reported that EGCG might be useful in the prevention or treatment of androgenetic alopecia by selectively inhibiting 5alpha-reductase activity. However, no report has been issued to date on the effect of EGCG on human hair growth. This study was undertaken to measure the effect of EGCG on hair growth in vitro and to investigate its effect on human dermal papilla cells (DPCs) in vivo and in vitro.

EGCG promoted hair growth in hair follicles ex vivo culture and the proliferation of cultured DPCs. The growth stimulation of DPCs by EGCG in vitro may be mediated through the upregulations of phosphorylated Erk and Akt and by an increase in the ratio of Bcl-2/Bax ratio. Similar results were also obtained in in vivo dermal papillae of human scalps. Thus, we suggest that EGCG stimulates human hair growth through these dual proliferative and anti-apoptotic effects on DPCs.

In this study, one of the main green tea catechins, epigallocatechin-3-gallate (or ECGC) was used topically in cultured hair follicles, cultured dermal papilla cells, and the scalps of human volunteers.

In cultured hair follicles, the application of a 95% green tea extract more than doubled the length of hair follicles. Hair growth almost tripled. In the cultured skin cells, the extract increased the growth of new cells in a dose-dependent manner.

The authors report that EGCG affects the expressions of Erk, Akt, Bcl-2 and Bax, and suggest that this effect may be the reason behind the results seen in follicle and skin cell cultures.

To see whether similar effects happen in vivo, the authors mixed 10% EGCG in ethanol and applied it directly onto human scalps. Again, significant changes in the expressions were seen, which means that if their theory about these expressions being the cause of hair growth, ECGC works both in vitro and in vivo. The authors conclude that ECGC stimulates hair growth through its proliferative and anti-apoptotic effects, and that ECGC may prolong the anagen stage.

So can you do the same thing at home? It seems so.

To make your own inhuman experiment, you’d need to buy a green tea extract with as much catechins as possible (95% ECGC was used in the study) and mix it with ethanol. All you need to do then is rub it on your head and wait for results.


#2

Im testing green tea’s effect on sebum right now. Will have a result in about one week.


#3

That’s awsome benji. Definetly look forward to the results.

r u testing it as a result of the study posted or were u already testing it.

» Im testing green tea’s effect on sebum right now. Will have a result in
» about one week.


#4

» That’s awsome benji. Definetly look forward to the results.
»
» r u testing it as a result of the study posted or were u already testing
» it.
»
»
» » Im testing green tea’s effect on sebum right now. Will have a result in
» » about one week.

Really cool stuff. I’m taking green tea internally and hoping for the best. If you could possibly post a recipe that is easy to follow I will have a go at a home brew. I’m not familiar with using ethynol and will no doubt create an explosion.

Any help is appreciated.

Hopefull


#5

I’m currently looking to for the appropriate mixture as well using green tea extraction (benji i hope ure using extraction).

When I have something solid I’ll re-post a follow-up.

Only issue I have with testing the stuff is that I’m currently on a list of treatments as well including dut. So for me to pin-point any growth owing to green tea extract will be a tough one. However, that study posted clearly indicated not only substancial evidence but a very satisfying conclusion as well.

» » That’s awsome benji. Definetly look forward to the results.
» »
» » r u testing it as a result of the study posted or were u already
» testing
» » it.
» »
» »
» » » Im testing green tea’s effect on sebum right now. Will have a result
» in
» » » about one week.
»
»
»
» Really cool stuff. I’m taking green tea internally and hoping for the
» best. If you could possibly post a recipe that is easy to follow I will
» have a go at a home brew. I’m not familiar with using ethynol and will no
» doubt create an explosion.
»
» Any help is appreciated.
»
» Hopefull


#6

» I’m currently looking to for the appropriate mixture as well using green
» tea extraction (benji i hope ure using extraction).
»
» When I have something solid I’ll re-post a follow-up.
»
» Only issue I have with testing the stuff is that I’m currently on a list
» of treatments as well including dut. So for me to pin-point any growth
» owing to green tea extract will be a tough one. However, that study posted
» clearly indicated not only substancial evidence but a very satisfying
» conclusion as well.
»
»
» » » That’s awsome benji. Definetly look forward to the results.
» » »
» » » r u testing it as a result of the study posted or were u already
» » testing
» » » it.
» » »
» » »
» » » » Im testing green tea’s effect on sebum right now. Will have a
» result
» » in
» » » » about one week.
» »
» »
» »
» » Really cool stuff. I’m taking green tea internally and hoping for the
» » best. If you could possibly post a recipe that is easy to follow I will
» » have a go at a home brew. I’m not familiar with using ethynol and will
» no
» » doubt create an explosion.
» »
» » Any help is appreciated.
» »
» » Hopefull

thanks for the fast response. I too am on a bunch of things and to me I want some results first and then figure out what it was that worked the best.

I figure with all the brain power around here we can pinpoint it. I’m downing my glass of Apple cider vinegar right now and going to bed.

I’ve found some better resveratrol for me and will mix that with the curcummin as well.

I’ve only been on Dutas for 2 weeks so Im sticking with it for 12 months no matter what.

I have a bottle of green tea extract so I’ll be eating those capsules as well.

thanks
Hopefull


#7

Just a bit of feedback.

Tried minoxidil, wasn`t very promising after 4-5months.

So now topical green tea and drinking about 3-4 mugs a day.

Great results after 2 months, real hair , not minoxidil fluff. My problem, horse shoe type hairloss in front slowly progressing for the last 4 years.
Now , starting from hairline, real hairs in the first few centimeters and solid thinner hairs all the way to my original hairline.

Am now making my own green tea extract, took a boxfull of Twinings gunpowder green tea. Dumped that into 1 liter of 96 percent technical ethanol. slightly heated the solution and ran it in a blender for a while, then filter. Very dark green and strong extract.

Mixed the extract 50/50 with Jojoba oil, in 30ml, added some essential oils, 10 drops Rosemary, 10 Lavender.Shake the mix, massage into scalp, that up, leave in treatment for 20mins or more.

Also using a bit of the pure ethanol extract in the mornings to dab onto the areas that need it the most.

One a side note…WHITE TEA?

White is the New Green
There’s a lesser known tea available and it’s not black or green. It’s white. Whereas green tea comes from more matured parts of the tea plant, white tea is made from new growth buds and young leaves and is steamed and processed more quickly. As a result white tea has the most polyphenols of all types of tea — as much a three times the amount compared to green tea. So if you’re looking best bang for you buck with regards polyhpenol levels from natural sources, white tea is the top dog.

So, is it worth drinking green or white tea for hair loss still? Hell yeh. You will get one or two modest hair related perks, plus plenty of added health benefits. There is no real reason not to be drinking a cup or two a day. Just don’t expect any miracles — unless you’re small, white and furry and like cheese.


#8

Sounds great, mj! A word of caution - DO NOT heat alcohol on the stove. If you do, you may find yourself on the business end of a world of hurt.


#9

Really? I knew I should’ve never dropped biology

Then how do you heat it?

» Sounds great, mj! A word of caution - DO NOT heat
» alcohol on the stove. If you do, you may find yourself on the business end
» of a world of hurt.


#10

Please give us the full citation for the study.


#11

» Please give us the full citation for the study.

Via pubmed:

1: Phytomedicine. 2007 Aug;14(7-8):551-5. Epub 2006 Nov 7. Links
Human hair growth enhancement in vitro by green tea epigallocatechin-3-gallate (EGCG).Kwon OS, Han JH, Yoo HG, Chung JH, Cho KH, Eun HC, Kim KH.
Department of Dermatology, Seoul National University College of Medicine, Laboratory of Cutaneous Aging and Hair Research, Seoul National University Hospital, Institute of Dermatological Science, Seoul National University, 110-744 Seoul, Republic of Korea.

Green tea is a popular worldwide beverage, and its potential beneficial effects such as anti-cancer and anti-oxidant properties are believed to be mediated by epigallocatechin-3-gallate (EGCG), a major constituent of polyphenols. Recently, it was reported that EGCG might be useful in the prevention or treatment of androgenetic alopecia by selectively inhibiting 5alpha-reductase activity. However, no report has been issued to date on the effect of EGCG on human hair growth. This study was undertaken to measure the effect of EGCG on hair growth in vitro and to investigate its effect on human dermal papilla cells (DPCs) in vivo and in vitro. EGCG promoted hair growth in hair follicles ex vivo culture and the proliferation of cultured DPCs. The growth stimulation of DPCs by EGCG in vitro may be mediated through the upregulations of phosphorylated Erk and Akt and by an increase in the ratio of Bcl-2/Bax ratio. Similar results were also obtained in in vivo dermal papillae of human scalps. Thus, we suggest that EGCG stimulates human hair growth through these dual proliferative and anti-apoptotic effects on DPCs.

PMID: 17092697 [PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE

IM not paying to read the whole thing, but obviously the Korean doctors did indeep test this on human scalps or they wouldn’t have made that “human scalps” and “in vivo” statement I highlighted. Im assuming the link Mj2003 got was from a source that had seen the full study. I posted this a while back on hairsite.


#12

Benie how is your Green Teaa Extract test coming along?


#13

Hey, it sounds easy enough, who else has been using it, any results? I want to give this a try but don’t want my head to smell like a tea house in the morning, I wonder if it would work if I only use it at night before I go to bed.

More feedback please, anyonne who has results or lack there of


#14

I hope I don’t sound overly negative, but do any of you really think green tea topicals can regrow hair? I don’t know if any of you were around in the Waseda days, but he touted the benefits of green tea among other ingredients like perilla and he posted pics of his progress but eventually that craze died down as there was no one that really had any tangible benefits, including myself. Now, green tea topicals sure as heck can’t hurt, but I hardly believe this is the “cure” we’ve been waiting for. Just my opinion.


#15

» I hope I don’t sound overly negative, but do any of you really think green
» tea topicals can regrow hair? I don’t know if any of you were around in
» the Waseda days, but he touted the benefits of green tea among other
» ingredients like perilla and he posted pics of his progress but eventually
» that craze died down as there was no one that really had any tangible
» benefits, including myself. Now, green tea topicals sure as heck can’t
» hurt, but I hardly believe this is the “cure” we’ve been waiting for. Just
» my opinion.

Well, I hope it works.

I’ve been downing the green tea capsules orally. Is the oral green tea worth doing for hair loss? And would this topical be better?

thanks


#16

Good stuff, even Sawaya endorses green tea, I am going to give this a try,

If you have any sense, you’re drinking green tea regularly and enjoying all the benefits. Your metabolism is turbo-charged, you’re losing fat, losing weight and flooding your body with all those wonderful anti-oxidants. Your teeth are in better shape because of reduced plaque. You have more energy. The catechins in it are thought to help prevent cancers so you’re cutting down on your risk of cancer too.

You don’t have to just drink it to benefit from it, however. Did you know that green tea can help prevent hair loss and other hair disorders?

The same antioxidants that help your body fight the free radicals that attack your cells also help your scalp when you use green tea shampoo. It protects your scalp from infections and gets rid of the impurities.

The catechins help inhibit 5-alpha-reductase, which contributes to baldness. If you like technical jargon, here’s what Dr. Marty Sawaya says about the the benefits, "Using green tea to grow hair probably relates to the evidence for influencing circulating hormones in the body. A high intake of green tea correlates to higher levels of sex hormone-binding protein - or globulin, which carries hormones like testosterone around the body in a bound, unusable form so that tissues cannot use it directly.

Testosterone is usually carried around the body by this binding protein, therefore, reducing levels of free testosterone, so that it cannot be converted to dihydrotestosterone (DHT) in the hair follicle, which is thought to shorten the hair cycle and cause hair loss in men."

So if you are at risk for male pattern baldness, not only should you make sure that your shampoo contains green tea, you should also drink it every day. You can take capsules instead but fresh, brewed tea is the best. It also relaxes the blood vessels and improves circulation, which also helps with hair loss.

Even if you don’t have hair problems, you benefit from this shampoo because it cleans very gently and leaves your hair lush because it nourishes your hair with vitamins and moisturizes it.


#17

» Good stuff, even Sawaya endorses green tea, I am going to give this a try,
»
» http://ezinearticles.com/?Wash-Your-Hair-With-Green-Tea-and-Reduce-Hair-Loss&id=935862
»
» If you have any sense, you’re drinking green tea regularly and enjoying
» all the benefits. Your metabolism is turbo-charged, you’re losing fat,
» losing weight and flooding your body with all those wonderful
» anti-oxidants. Your teeth are in better shape because of reduced plaque.
» You have more energy. The catechins in it are thought to help prevent
» cancers so you’re cutting down on your risk of cancer too.
»
» You don’t have to just drink it to benefit from it, however. Did you know
» that green tea can help prevent hair loss and other hair disorders?
»
» The same antioxidants that help your body fight the free radicals that
» attack your cells also help your scalp when you use green tea shampoo. It
» protects your scalp from infections and gets rid of the impurities.
»
» The catechins help inhibit 5-alpha-reductase, which contributes to
» baldness. If you like technical jargon, here’s what Dr. Marty Sawaya says
» about the the benefits, “Using green tea to grow hair probably relates to
» the evidence for influencing circulating hormones in the body. A high
» intake of green tea correlates to higher levels of sex hormone-binding
» protein - or globulin, which carries hormones like testosterone around the
» body in a bound, unusable form so that tissues cannot use it directly.

»
» Testosterone is usually carried around the body by this binding
» protein, therefore, reducing levels of free testosterone, so that it cannot
» be converted to dihydrotestosterone (DHT) in the hair follicle, which is
» thought to shorten the hair cycle and cause hair loss in men.”

»
» So if you are at risk for male pattern baldness, not only should you make
» sure that your shampoo contains green tea, you should also drink it every
» day. You can take capsules instead but fresh, brewed tea is the best. It
» also relaxes the blood vessels and improves circulation, which also helps
» with hair loss.
»
» Even if you don’t have hair problems, you benefit from this shampoo
» because it cleans very gently and leaves your hair lush because it
» nourishes your hair with vitamins and moisturizes it.


#18

But is all this really contained (or at least weighted in favor of) a topical influence? Not a systemic one?

If it’s a systemic effect of inhibiting 5-alpha-reductase, then what’s the point? That’s just one more new & complicated way to do the job that a Finasteride pill already does better.


#19

Doesn’t the study have any merrit?

» But is all this really contained (or at least weighted in favor of) a
» topical influence? Not a systemic one?
»
» If it’s a systemic effect of inhibiting 5-alpha-reductase, then what’s the
» point? That’s just one more new & complicated way to do the job that a
» Finasteride pill already does better.


#20

Ive used green tea/alcohol on one cheek…usually once a day.

Ive used topical beta sitosterol on one side of forehead—squeezed out of a capsule on warm moist skin, once a day

Ive used topical lavender above the other eyebrow, once a day.

Ive only missed a couple of days.

Results are…green tea cheek is coming in at about a 4 vs. a definite 5 on the untreated cheek. There is definitely a reduction in sebum.

The beta sitosterol and the lavender have about as many “dots” as before, but the dots are definitely smaller than they were last week. I guess Ive been doing this for roughly 10 days now.
I should have put a sebutape strip in the middle of my forehead where no topical was applied and seen how it did for a “control”. I’ll probably do this again in a few more days and do just that.

I waited about 65 minutes this time to peel the strips.

Short summary, there is a reduction, but it isn’t something like 50% or anything. More like 20%. Then again, Ive only been applying these things once a day…and I have missed a couple of days. I’ll keep it up a while longer and retest and see what I get then. In the cedarwood oil patent for instance, which was the biggest sebum-reducing agent Johnson and Johnson tested, a dip in sebum production was seen from months 3 through 6.

I have plenty more sebutape left :slight_smile: