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New discovery


#1

#2

“However, it could be a decade before such therapies are developed” means it can take 10 years?


#3

Yeah… Always ten years! If you understand how all the cells work, why would it take ten years? In other words, keeping sending us money. What you want to bet in the next few weeks Cots will post some major discovery!


#4

[quote][postedby]Originally Posted by superhl[/postedby]
Yeah… Always ten years! If you understand how all the cells work, why would it take ten years? In other words, keeping sending us money. What you want to bet in the next few weeks Cots will post some major discovery![/quote]

The report was very vague. All we know is it’s something involving stem cells and the work is being done at the University of Calgary in Canada. But a lot of researchers around the world are already working with stem cells in relation to regrowing hair.


#5

More about this discovery – Dr. Jeff Biernaskie at the University of Calgary’s Faculty of Veterinary Medicine, discovered a new population of stem cells at or near the dermal sheath at the bottom of the follicle, near the dermal papilla cells. This proves there are regenerative cells at the dermal papilla, exactly where they’re needed. But these stem cells have to be activated.

What he’s talking about is a longer term project to identify drugs that would activate this population of stem cells. He’s right, that whole process could take 10 years or more – including getting the drugs FDA approved.

http://www.ucalgary.ca/utoday/issue/2014-12-10/stem-cell-discovery-sheds-new-light-hair-growth


#6

The improvement I see is that now instead of 5 years away, the cure is 10 years away.

Hopefully in another 20 years they will be more realistic and will say that the cure is 20 years away and so on.


#7

[quote][postedby]Originally Posted by bugler[/postedby]
The improvement I see is that now instead of 5 years away, the cure is 10 years away.

Hopefully in another 20 years they will be more realistic and will say that the cure is 20 years away and so on.[/quote]

so frustrating, it seems that we make 1 step forward and 2 steps back, no encouraging news lately, none whatsoever.


#8

Roger, is there a possibility that these cells are activated by the excretions from adipose derived stem cells? And if these cells are activated by the excretions from adipose derived stem cells then doesn’t that mean that nourishing these cells with AAPE or Histogen’s HSC would help to reverse hair loss?

It seems to me that this doctor in Calgary has not moved the ball forward one inch. I don’t think he’s come up with anything new; I just think he’s illuminated some of the infinitesimal details of something that we already knew. We already knew that somehow adipose derived stem cells excretions cause follicles to grow but we don’t know the underlying details. Now he comes along and explains some of those underlying mechanism. So what? We don’t need this information to apply AAPE or HSC to our heads, do we? In other words, really what he is telling us is how HSC and AAPE work but do we really need that information in order to make AAPE and HSC work? Of course not.

Minoxidil worked on some people long before they figured out how minoxidil works. The success the good responders had with minoxidil was no less gratifying for them because nobody knew how it worked. If you use AAPE or Histogen’s HSC and it gets you your hair back and you don’t know the underlying mechanisms do you care?

He’s not telling us anything important and he’s not slowing the cure process down. We still need AAPE or Histogen’s HSC just like we needed one of them before he released his findings. All he’s telling is how AAPE/HSC work. He’s not coming up with some new issue.

[quote][postedby]Originally Posted by roger_that[/postedby]
More about this discovery – Dr. Jeff Biernaskie at the University of Calgary’s Faculty of Veterinary Medicine, discovered a new population of stem cells at or near the dermal sheath at the bottom of the follicle, near the dermal papilla cells. This proves there are regenerative cells at the dermal papilla, exactly where they’re needed. But these stem cells have to be activated.

What he’s talking about is a longer term project to identify drugs that would activate this population of stem cells. He’s right, that whole process could take 10 years or more – including getting the drugs FDA approved.

[/quote]


#9

[quote]Roger, is there a possibility that these cells are activated by the excretions from adipose derived stem cells?

It seems to me that this doctor in Calgary has not moved the ball forward one inch. I don’t think he’s come up with anything new; I just think he’s illuminated some of the infinitesimal details of something that we already knew.[/quote]

I agree. This article is a combination of George Cotsarelis and Valerie Horsley’s Yale study. Cotsarelis found no shortage of stem cells in miniaturizing follicles and a marked shortage of progenitor cells. Valerie Horsley’s Yale study suggests the adipose layer signals the production of blood platelet growth factors. There are many possible ways of addressing these issues… Find a way to safely improve the adipose layer in balding areas of scalp. I believe finasteride and dutasteride helps to some degree. While meeting patients taking the photos here at Dr. Cole’s office, I noticed that men who have been on finasteride or dutasteride have a more feminine scalp. it’s “spongier” and has a better adipose layer. Topical fin or dut may be a good alternative for some men. PRP improves the hair shaft diameter of miniaturizing hair, so identifying the mechanism that triggers the production of platelet derived growth factors would be valuable. Prostaglandin D2 plays a role in normal hair cycles and when the cycles are tipped toward extended telogen as observed in balding scalp, finding a way to reduce the presence or destructive characteristics of this enzyme should help. Injected in mice, Cotsarelis noted hair loss and in other bodily organs, PGD2 is responsible for apoptosis. Can the PGD2 receptor be safely blocked?

Gene therapy would be the ultimate solution IMO. Other solutions relate to hair transplant surgery. Dr. Mwamba is working on follicle regeneration and Dr. Cole is working with MiMedx.

The contents of my posts are my opinions and not medical advice
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