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My take on Follica from their patent


#1

EXAMPLE 7

EDIHN-INDUCES NEW HAIR FOLLICLES IN HUMAN SKIN

MATERIALS AND EXPERIMENTAL METHODS

Grafting

[000210] Discarded human, adult scalp from the preauricular area obtained from plastic surgery was grafted onto immunodeficient (scid) mice. The graft was bandaged and allowed to heal, then was used in the wound healing study 3 months after grafting.

RESULTS

[000211 ] To determine whether human skin responded to EDIHN as did mouse skin, human skin was grafted onto SCID (immuno-deficient) mice and subjected to depilation by plucking and wound induction three days later. Seven days following wound induction, formation of new HF was observed in the human skin (Figure 2 IA; arrows indicate new HF) by hematoxylin and eosin staining of paraffin embedded tissue sections.

[000212]In additional experiments, adult human skin was grafted onto mice., abraded, and examined at 7 days post-abrasion. New HF were generated in the human skkx, which mimicked normal hair follicle formation during fetal development, as evidenced by staining for SlOO A6 or S100A4 (Figure 21B). P-7628-PC

[000213] The results of this Example show that EDIHN can be used to generate hair growth inhuman skin as for mouse skin.

EXAMPLE 8

It DOES NOT take 10 days post dermabrasion for follicles to begin forming in human skin. Just because follicles “are forming” however DOES NOT mean you will be able to see them. These are hair germs. Seeing the new hair will probably take a couple of months post procedure. Without the addition of wnt7a, not that many new follicles were made in the experiments. 140 hairs were made with wnt7a, vs. about 9 measley hairs without it. The epidermal growth factor receptor blocking drug is probably the second most important thing in the patent, and depilation three days before wounding was the third. All the other enhancements like arginine, beta catenin are less important than these.

Important: HERE IS WHAT I REALLY THINK--------------------------Follica’s procedure might produce pretty good hairs back in the wreath area of your head, where the scalp produced your “donor” hair. Unless they find a way to supress some autologus genes in the frontal scalp during this time with whatever exotic subtances, hairs made up front (if they can be made in the thinner, missing-water-layered-less-fatty-acids-in-the-skin FRONTAL SCALP) might be weaker hairs or even vellus-type hairs. OF COURSE I HOPE THAT ISNT THE CASE, and that the hairs made up front are big-thick and healthy and being on finasteride during their development (finasteride is mentioned in the patent along with some other anti-androgens) they will be resistant to DHT, but that may not be the case.

IF FOLLICA can merely work in your donor area, it will be able to “make” more hair for transplantion available to be moved up front, and in-effect “hair multiplication”. If we could simply “come up with” 10,000 more hairs that could be moved up front, most of us would be very well-off with just a regular transplant. Its my hope that one will be able to shave their donor area-----have follica performed------and have very thick donor hair in the wreath grow in so and FUE surgeon can move it up front without thinning out the back of your head. I’d love for them to hit a home run, but would happily embrace a -smaller-success in the wreath.

For any of you who may be newbies wondering about baldness-------------you inherit a variant of the androgen receptor gene that can express itself more or less strongly depending on genetic chance. If it expresses itself strongly with CAG-repeates, the hair outside your wreaths androgen receptor’s are much more adept at uptaking male hormone, especially dihydrotestosterone. Having alot of DHT in the scalp tissue (bald men have been shown to have more DHT in their scalps, but not in the blood, indicating that the alpha five reductase enzymes in the root sheaths of each and ever hair follicle on your head are probably more active than a guy with all his hair) has been shown to be able to invigorate androgen receptors even MORE. One too much androgen is uptaken…eventually something happens to the hair follicle and a different set of genetic instructions are obeyed within it. The dermal papilla starts cranking out way too much DKK_1, which leads to the cell death of the keratincoyetes in the root sheath…these dead cells in turn hanging around the infidulum is probably why the immune system begins attacking the hair follicle and TGF beta and excessive collagenous deposition is downstream from it. That is probably “baldness”, as the immune system is going to try to eliminate dead cells and anything around the area is going to be effected by all the infllammatory subtstances the immune system will use. Baldness looks like organ rejection microscopically. Its been shown that wreath area hairs can succumb to testosterone and DHT if experiments give enough of them to the hairs…so I dont believe their is some magic difference in the hair’s basic characteristics but a difference in the amount of DHT the hair can make via its alpha five reductase enzyme in their root sheaths and a big difference in how well the hairs androgen receptors work and how chemcially stable they are. In a way male baldness is probably because you have too-well-working-androgen-receptors and too-well-working-alpha-five-reductase-enzymes in your hair. You are “too manly” in a place you dont want to be.


#2

good post benji…its seems like wounding & Wnt7a is the way to go. Btw, did you look at the herbal treatment that I got from someone…what do you think about it?

I’m definitely thinking of doing something along the lines of Follica as I metnioned in another thread…but a safer version. Kick my treatment off with a light chemical peel (Neutrogena peel 20% glycol acid). First I’ll use it alone for few weeks to rejuvenate the scalp. It works primarily on epidermis layer - I’m quite sure hair loss messes it up pretty good. I’ll follow it with the application of copper-peptides/emu oil/cedarwood oil/anyother thing that promotes elastin remodelling in the skin.

Then i’ll start that herbal treatment…the guy said it would take about 6 months and he didn’t mention any scalp peel or such thing. But I’m quite confident that if we can improve scalp health the quality & result of the experiment would be better and faster.

Also, I was checking “Trichocyte” (ICX-TRC stuff basically) on wikipedia and it says that they contain large amounts of Cysteine…which incidentally is also found in garlic. So Garlic has lithium & Cysteine in it. This definitely adds some more credibility to that herbal treatment!

Can you name the specific layers that get messed up during hairloss? fatty acid is the bottom most…if that gets messed up I doubt its even possible to restore it. dermal layer (the one over fatty layer), which also houses the hair follicles can be rejuvenated by a deep chemical peel but those are tricky - need to be done by a professional and still there is a risk of scarring. The final layer is epidermis, thats very the light chemical peels work i.e. remove it so the body creates a new one.


#3

Benji
You are “too manly” in a place you dont want to be.

lol. that comment makes me think of these “unmanly” douchebags


#4

»
» Important: HERE IS WHAT I REALLY
» THINK--------------------------Follica’s procedure might produce pretty
» good hairs back in the wreath area of your head, where the scalp produced
» your “donor” hair. Unless they find a way to supress some autologus genes
» in the frontal scalp during this time with whatever exotic subtances,
» hairs made up front (if they can be made in the thinner,
» missing-water-layered-less-fatty-acids-in-the-skin FRONTAL SCALP) might be
» weaker hairs or even vellus-type hairs.

If they couldnt do it, I hardly think they would pursue it in the first place. I just dont think they had in mind… dermabrading the donor area and then transplanting it to the front. This approach just doesnt make sense to me.


#5

»
» If they couldnt do it, I hardly think they would pursue it in the first
» place. I just dont think they had in mind… dermabrading the donor area
» and then transplanting it to the front. This approach just doesnt make
» sense to me.

If it is really that easy to grow new hair, they must have done a lot of human trails by now already, true? I read somewhere that says this thing doesn’t even need FDA approval.


#6

» »
» » Important: HERE IS WHAT I REALLY
» » THINK--------------------------Follica’s procedure might produce pretty
» » good hairs back in the wreath area of your head, where the scalp
» produced
» » your “donor” hair. Unless they find a way to supress some autologus
» genes
» » in the frontal scalp during this time with whatever exotic subtances,
» » hairs made up front (if they can be made in the thinner,
» » missing-water-layered-less-fatty-acids-in-the-skin FRONTAL SCALP) might
» be
» » weaker hairs or even vellus-type hairs.
»
»
» If they couldnt do it, I hardly think they would pursue it in the first
» place. I just dont think they had in mind… dermabrading the donor area
» and then transplanting it to the front. This approach just doesnt make
» sense to me.

I hope you are right about that MPB. However, it may be noted that bald scalp is quite different from hairy scalp (surely you have see this on a balding man with a buzzcut). This process gives us an embryonic window where follicles can form just like they did when you were a fetus. The problem is, that the hairs that formed when you were a fetus left town on you. Im hoping these dont do the same, but pepper my expectations.

Garlic study with alopecia areata (but caution that alopecia areata and androgenic alopecia are two different things) :

Combination of topical garlic gel and betamethasone valerate cream in the treatment of localized alopecia areata: A double-blind randomized controlled study

Hajheydari Zohreh1, Jamshidi Mojgan1, Akbari Jafar2, Mohammadpour Rezaali3
1 Department of Dermatology, Booali Sina Hospital, Mazandaran University of Medical Sciences, Sari, Iran
2 Department of Pharmacology, Booali Sina Hospital, Mazandaran University of Medical Sciences, Sari, Iran
3 Department of Biostatistics, Booali Sina Hospital, Mazandaran University of Medical Sciences, Sari, Iran

Correspondence Address:
Hajheydari Zohreh
Department of Dermatology, Booali Sina Hospital, Mazandaran University of Medical Sciences, Sari
Iran

Source of Support: None, Conflict of Interest: None

Abstract

Background: Alopecia areata is a recurrent, nonscarring type of hair loss. Different modalities of treatment have been used to induce hair re-growth. Aims: To determine the efficacy of topical garlic gel in the treatment of alopecia areata. Methods: Patients were randomly divided into two groups of garlic gel and placebo. The two groups were advised to follow the treatment twice daily, for three months. Both groups received topical application of corticosteroid (betamethasone cream 0.1% in isopropyl alcohol) twice daily. Baseline demographic characteristics and the size of patches, total number of grown hair and number of terminal hair at the end of each month were recorded. Effectiveness was assessed by scoring the results. Statistical analysis was done by means of chi-square and t test. Results: Forty patients met the inclusion criteria and enrolled for the study. The first group (garlic treated) consisted of 20 patients (12 males, 60% and eight females, 40%). The second group (control) consisted of 20 patients (10 males, 50% and 10 females, 50%). At the end of the treatment, good and moderate responses were observed in 19 (95%) and one (5%) patients of the case group respectively, which was significantly better than the control group ( P = 0.001). No complication was observed in the patients under study. Conclusion: The present study showed that the use of garlic gel significantly added to the therapeutic efficacy of topical betamethasone valerate in alopecia areata and that it can be an effective adjunctive topical therapy for alopecia areata.


#7

» Abstract
»
» Background: Alopecia areata is a recurrent, nonscarring type of hair loss.
» Different modalities of treatment have been used to induce hair re-growth.
» Aims: To determine the efficacy of topical garlic gel in the treatment of
» alopecia areata. Methods: Patients were randomly divided into two groups
» of garlic gel and placebo. The two groups were advised to follow the
» treatment twice daily, for three months. Both groups received topical
» application of corticosteroid (betamethasone cream 0.1% in isopropyl
» alcohol) twice daily. Baseline demographic characteristics and the size of
» patches, total number of grown hair and number of terminal hair at the end
» of each month were recorded. Effectiveness was assessed by scoring the
» results. Statistical analysis was done by means of chi-square and t test.
» Results: Forty patients met the inclusion criteria and enrolled for the
» study. The first group (garlic treated) consisted of 20 patients (12
» males, 60% and eight females, 40%). The second group (control) consisted
» of 20 patients (10 males, 50% and 10 females, 50%). At the end of the
» treatment, good and moderate responses were observed in 19 (95%) and one
» (5%) patients of the case group respectively, which was significantly
» better than the control group ( P = 0.001). No complication was observed
» in the patients under study. Conclusion: The present study showed that the
» use of garlic gel significantly added to the therapeutic efficacy of
» topical betamethasone valerate in alopecia areata and that it can be an
» effective adjunctive topical therapy for alopecia areata.

The problem with these studies is that they never define the hair growth statistically. They just said “good and moderate responses were observed”, well my definition of good and moderate can be very different from theirs.


#8

» The problem with these studies is that they never define the hair growth
» statistically. They just said “good and moderate responses were observed”,
» well my definition of good and moderate can be very different from theirs.

Scoring of hairlessness was as follows: size (7.6-10 cm²: 1 point, 5.1-7.5 cm²: 2 points, 2.6-5 cm²: 3 points, 0-2.5 cm²: 4 points), number of hair (no hair: 1 point, 1-15: 2 points, 16-30: 3 points, more than 30: 4 points) and number of terminal hair (1-10: 1 point, 11-20: 2 points, 21-30: 3 points, more than 30: 4 points). Treatment outcome was evaluated by giving total score (weak: <6 points, moderate: 6-9 points, good: ³ 9 points).

Mean of total score in the garlic group at the first, second and third months was 6.5, 8.7, 10.2 respectively, that was significantly ( P <0.001) more than the baseline score and in the control group mean of total score for each month was 7, 7.5, 8.2 respectively and significant difference was found vs. baseline scores ( P <0.05).


#9

» It DOES NOT take 10 days post dermabrasion for follicles to begin
» forming in human skin
. Just because follicles “are forming” however
» DOES NOT mean you will be able to see them.
These are hair germs.
» Seeing the new hair will probably take a couple of months post procedure.
» Without the addition of wnt7a, not that many new follicles were made in
» the experiments. 140 hairs were made with wnt7a, vs. about 9 measley
» hairs without it
. The epidermal growth factor receptor blocking drug
» is probably the second most important thing in the patent, and depilation
» three days before wounding was the third. All the other enhancements like
» arginine, beta catenin are less important than these.

Maybe Wnt** expression on its own is the key provess why hair is generated and applying something that mimics it is just giving everything a kick in the ass.
that idea came only from a quick read on pubmed. unfortunately I have no time to research it further.

Wnt signaling induces epithelial differentiation during cutaneous wound healing.

BACKGROUND: Cutaneous wound repair in adult mammals does not regenerate the original epithelial architecture and results in altered skin function. We propose that lack of regeneration may be due to the absence of appropriate molecular signals to promote regeneration. In this study, we investigated the regulation of Wnt signaling during cutaneous wound healing and the consequence of activating either the beta-catenin-dependent or beta-catenin-independent Wnt signaling on epidermal architecture during wound repair. RESULTS: We determined that the expression of Wnt ligands that typically signal via the beta-catenin-independent pathway is up-regulated in the wound while the beta-catenin-dependent Wnt signaling is activated in the hair follicles adjacent to the wound edge. Ectopic activation of beta-catenin-dependent Wnt signaling with lithium chloride in the wound resulted in epithelial cysts and occasional rudimentary hair follicle structures within the epidermis. In contrast, forced expression of Wnt-5a in the deeper wound induced changes in the interfollicular epithelium mimicking regeneration, including formation of epithelia-lined cysts in the wound dermis, rudimentary hair follicles and sebaceous glands, without formation of tumors. CONCLUSION: These findings suggest that adult interfollicular epithelium is capable of responding to Wnt morphogenic signals necessary for restoring epithelial tissue patterning in the skin during wound repair.


#10

In this study it is much more specific

Wnt-dependent de novo hair follicle regeneration in adult mouse skin after wounding.

The mammalian hair follicle is a complex ‘mini-organ’ thought to form only during development; loss of an adult follicle is considered permanent. However, the possibility that hair follicles develop de novo following wounding was raised in studies on rabbits, mice and even humans fifty years ago. Subsequently, these observations were generally discounted because definitive evidence for follicular neogenesis was not presented. Here we show that, after wounding, hair follicles form de novo in genetically normal adult mice. The regenerated hair follicles establish a stem cell population, express known molecular markers of follicle differentiation, produce a hair shaft and progress through all stages of the hair follicle cycle. Lineage analysis demonstrated that the nascent follicles arise from epithelial cells outside of the hair follicle stem cell niche, suggesting that epidermal cells in the wound assume a hair follicle stem cell phenotype. Inhibition of Wnt signalling after re-epithelialization completely abrogates this wounding-induced folliculogenesis, whereas overexpression of Wnt ligand in the epidermis increases the number of regenerated hair follicles. These remarkable regenerative capabilities of the adult support the notion that wounding induces an embryonic phenotype in skin, and that this provides a window for manipulation of hair follicle neogenesis by Wnt proteins. These findings suggest treatments for wounds, hair loss and other degenerative skin disorders.


#11

» In this study it is much more specific
»
» Wnt-dependent de novo hair follicle regeneration in adult mouse skin after
» wounding.
»
» The mammalian hair follicle is a complex ‘mini-organ’ thought to form only
» during development; loss of an adult follicle is considered permanent.
» However, the possibility that hair follicles develop de novo following
» wounding was raised in studies on rabbits, mice and even humans fifty
» years ago. Subsequently, these observations were generally discounted
» because definitive evidence for follicular neogenesis was not presented.
» Here we show that, after wounding, hair follicles form de novo in
» genetically normal adult mice. The regenerated hair follicles
» establish a stem cell population, express known molecular markers of
» follicle differentiation, produce a hair shaft and progress through all
» stages of the hair follicle cycle
. Lineage analysis demonstrated that
» the nascent follicles arise from epithelial cells outside of the hair
» follicle stem cell niche, suggesting that epidermal cells in the wound
» assume a hair follicle stem cell phenotype. Inhibition of Wnt
» signalling after re-epithelialization completely abrogates this
» wounding-induced folliculogenesis, whereas overexpression of Wnt ligand in
» the epidermis increases the number of regenerated hair follicles
. These
» remarkable regenerative capabilities of the adult support the notion that
» wounding induces an embryonic phenotype in skin, and that this provides
» a window for manipulation of hair follicle neogenesis by Wnt proteins
.
» These findings suggest treatments for wounds, hair loss and other
» degenerative skin disorders.

yup, thats pretty much what they are hoping to do.

I wish they’d get on with these trials. The only way to know is to get started. Im fearful that this is going to work fairly well in adding hair to the donor area, but not so well on slick bald areas. I hope Im wrong about that.


#12

I emailed pure tech direct late March (because emails to Follica came back with a generic/clinical trial responder). The lady told me they plan on testing on humans soon, but that was it. Here’s her response (pretty much a cut and paste response):

Thank you for your interest in Follica. We cannot anticipate precisely when this will be launched as a commercial product, nor have we announced any specific clinical trial plans at this time, though we hope to conduct initial testing in humans in Boston soon. We look forward to announcing additional information as we progress. We know how much this means to so many people, and are focused on making it a medical reality. If you are interested in learning about the clinical trials if and when they are announced, please send an e-mail to clinical.info@follicabio.com I would also encourage you to visit www.follicabio.com periodically. We will announce any news there as we progress.

.


#13

I find it hard to imagine that anything would regrow normal hairs in the safe zone but not be able to do a damn thing in the unsafe zone. Even the most extreme cases of DHT-induced hair loss still usually take half a year to go from full-thickness to vellus hairs.

More likely, I think we’ll just be regrowing new hairs in the front and then protecting them as best we can with DHT inhibitors. When they start getting too damaged again, we’ll go in for another round of the Follica treatment.

I don’t think we will all be getting HTs in the front & top to move Follica’d hairs into place.

Even FUE work produces scarring in the donor skin. Take 20,000 grafts out of the back, even over several years, and eventually I think it’s gonna result in a pretty messed-up scalp back there. The Follica treatment is supposed to work on bare skin but they don’t say it’ll work on scarred up skin.


#14

» I find it hard to imagine that anything would regrow normal hairs in the
» safe zone but not be able to do a damn thing in the unsafe zone. Even the
» most extreme cases of DHT-induced hair loss still usually take half a year
» to go from full-thickness to vellus hairs.
»
» More likely, I think we’ll just be regrowing new hairs in the front and
» then protecting them as best we can with DHT inhibitors. When they start
» getting too damaged again, we’ll go in for another round of the Follica
» treatment.
»
»
»
» I don’t think we will all be getting HTs in the front & top to move
» Follica’d hairs into place.
»
» Even FUE work produces scarring in the donor skin. Take 20,000 grafts out
» of the back, even over several years, and eventually I think it’s gonna
» result in a pretty messed-up scalp back there. The Follica treatment is
» supposed to work on bare skin but they don’t say it’ll work on scarred up
» skin.

The patent deals with hairgrowth in scars via wounding…some of the hairtransplant human skin on mice would have had extraction scars on it…and it grew hair. They have a way to induce hair growth and to get rid of unwanted hair (dermabrate, wait until skin re-epilithializes, and ADD epidermal growth factor).