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Minoxidil Mechanism Figured out


#1

http://www.sciencedirect.com/science?_ob=ArticleURL&_udi=B6T87-524N9G8-2&_user=10&_coverDate=02%2F09%2F2011&_rdoc=1&_fmt=high&_orig=search&_origin=search&_sort=d&_docanchor=&view=c&_searchStrId=1647976834&_rerunOrigin=scholar.google&_acct=C000050221&_version=1&_urlVersion=0&_userid=10&md5=ba807acb88746140c31a29b734024514&searchtype=a


#2

… so Rogaine’s been out since the 80s, and they just figured-out its active mechanism now? Wow.

» http://www.sciencedirect.com/science?_ob=ArticleURL&_udi=B6T87-524N9G8-2&_user=10&_coverDate=02%2F09%2F2011&_rdoc=1&_fmt=high&_orig=search&_origin=search&_sort=d&_docanchor=&view=c&_searchStrId=1647976834&_rerunOrigin=scholar.google&_acct=C000050221&_version=1&_urlVersion=0&_userid=10&md5=ba807acb88746140c31a29b734024514&searchtype=a


#3

» http://www.sciencedirect.com/science?_ob=ArticleURL&_udi=B6T87-524N9G8-2&_user=10&_coverDate=02%2F09%2F2011&_rdoc=1&_fmt=high&_orig=search&_origin=search&_sort=d&_docanchor=&view=c&_searchStrId=1647976834&_rerunOrigin=scholar.google&_acct=C000050221&_version=1&_urlVersion=0&_userid=10&md5=ba807acb88746140c31a29b734024514&searchtype=a

I think Ahab already stated this…this study confirms it though. Funny :wink:


#4

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» http://www.sciencedirect.com/science?_ob=ArticleURL&_udi=B6T87-524N9G8-2&_user=10&_coverDate=02%2F09%2F2011&_rdoc=1&_fmt=high&_orig=search&_origin=search&_sort=d&_docanchor=&view=c&_searchStrId=1647976834&_rerunOrigin=scholar.google&_acct=C000050221&_version=1&_urlVersion=0&_userid=10&md5=ba807acb88746140c31a29b734024514&searchtype=a
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» I think Ahab already stated this…this study confirms it though. Funny :wink:

I can’t get the study link open. Could someone please copy and paste the study.


#5

Interesting indeed. Could someone please post the study. It has been impossible for me to open this link as well.
Thanks forum members


#6

» Interesting indeed. Could someone please post the study. It has been
» impossible for me to open this link as well.
» Thanks forum members

Minoxidil activates β-catenin pathway in human dermal papilla cells: A possible explanation for its anagen prolongation effect

References and further reading may be available for this article. To view references and further reading you must purchase this article.

Mi Hee Kwacka, Bo Mi Kanga, Moon Kyu Kima, Jung Chul Kima and Young Kwan Sung, a,

a Department of Immunology, School of Medicine, Kyungpook National University, Daegu 700-422, Korea

Received 28 October 2010; revised 13 January 2011; accepted 31 January 2011. Available online 9 February 2011.

Abstract
Background
It is believed that the length of the actively growing phase of the anagen hair cycle mainly contributes to hair length. Recent studies showed that maintenance of β-catenin activity in the dermal papilla cells (DPCs) enables hair follicles to keep actively growing. Topical minoxidil treatment promotes hair growth in men with androgenetic alopecia, suggesting that minoxidil may prolong the actively growing phase of the anagen hair cycle.

Objective
To investigate whether minoxidil prolongs the anagen hair cycle in mice and, if so, to investigate whether minoxidil activates β-catenin pathway in human DPCs.

Methods
Dorsal skins of C57BL/6 mice were depilated to synchronize the hair cycle. After 10 days, 3% minoxidil were topically applied daily for 10 days. Sections of back skins were stained with hematoxylin and eosin. Hair follicles were graded and hair cycle score (HCS) was calculated. Cultured human DPCs were transiently transfected with the β-catenin responsive TCF reporter plasmid (pTopflash) and corresponding negative control reporter (pFopflash) to assess the activity of β-catenin signaling by minoxidil. Immunofluorescence staining and immunoblot were performed to examine the expression and localization of β-catenin in the presence or absence of minoxidil. Phosphorylation of GSK3β, PKA and PKB were also examined by immunoblot after minoxidil treatment. RT-PCR analysis and immunoblot were employed to investigate the expression of β-catenin pathway targets in DPCs, such as Axin2, Lef-1, and EP2.

Results
Modest extension of anagen phase thereby delay of catagen progression was observed by application of minoxidil in mice. Minoxidil stimulated the transcriptional activity of pTopflash but not pFopflash. Nuclear accumulation of β-catenin was also observed after minoxidil treatment. Immunoblot further showed that minoxidil treatment increases the phosphorylation of GSK3β, PKA and PKB. Moreover, minoxidil induced Axin2, Lef-1, and EP2 expression.

Conclusion
Our results strongly suggest that minoxidil extends the anagen phase by activating β-catenin activity in the DPCs.

Corresponding author. Department of Immunology, School of Medicine, Kyungpook National University, 101 Dong-In-Dong, Jung-Gu, Daegu, 700-422, Korea., Tel.: 82-53-420-4874, fax: 82-53-423-4628

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#7

And here is the related study who figured out what this – all in all – means for you:

http://www.hairsite.com/hair-loss/board_entry-id-78848.html#p78878

Is topical minoxidil solution effective on androgenetic alopecia in routine daily practice?

J Dermatolog Treat 2007 ; 18(5):268-70

Mapar MA, Omidian M
Department of Dermatology, Imam Khomeini Hospital, Jundishapour Medical University, Ahvaz, Iran. mapar_m@yahoo.com

OBJECTIVES:
Minoxidil solution stimulates hair growth in androgenetic alopecia. In order to maintain any beneficial effect, applications must continue indefinitely. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the ratio of patients who were satisfied with the drug and continued to use it versus those who were displeased and did not continue their treatment, and the reasons for the discontinuation.

METHODS:
A total of 1495 men aged 20-40 years who suffered from androgenetic hair loss were selected among patients who were referred to two private dermatologists. They were subjected to treatment with 5% topical minoxidil solution. These patients were treated with no difference from the routine office patients. Factors such as the duration of treatment, adverse effects, the patient’s satisfaction and the causes of treatment cessation were also closely studied.

RESULTS:
Almost all the patients gradually avoided continuing the treatment. Only in a few patients was the cessation of medication due to adverse effects. The causes of discontinuation in the majority of patients were the low effect of medication and an aversion to this topical treatment method.

CONCLUSIONS:
The insignificant cosmetic effect of minoxidil solution caused discontinuity of treatment among almost all patients.

Source: http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/17917938


#8

So to make a long story short

“Save your Minox Money for future treatments, you will need the extra money pretty soon”


#9

» RESULTS:
» Almost all the patients gradually avoided continuing the treatment. Only in
» a few patients was the cessation of medication due to adverse effects.
» The causes of discontinuation in the majority of patients were the low
» effect of medication and an aversion to this topical treatment method
.
»
» CONCLUSIONS:
» The insignificant cosmetic effect of minoxidil solution caused
» discontinuity of treatment among almost all patients.
»
» Source: http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/17917938
» --------------------

C O M P A R I S O N (study 1987 below vs. study 2007 above)


Pharmacotherapy. 1987;7(6):191-7.
Topical minoxidil in the treatment of male pattern alopecia.

Kvedar JC, Baden HP.

Department of Dermatology, Harvard Medical School, Boston, Massachusetts.
Abstract

Male pattern hair loss (androgenetic alopecia) is a common problem. In fact, it affects nearly all males to some degree. Expression of the disorder is variable, and while it is never life-threatening, it often becomes a major source of consternation. The biology of the process is poorly understood, and no current therapy can halt or reverse the process. Only cosmetic surgery, which is painful, time consuming, and expensive, has been effective. In the past 7 years, since it was noted that a patient taking minoxidil for hypertension had reversal of male pattern hair loss, awareness of a possible therapeutic role for topical minoxidil in the management of this disorder has grown among physicians, scientists, and the general public. It can be concluded from available data that topical application of minoxidil is effective in providing cosmetically satisfying thickening of hair in a select group of individuals with male pattern hair loss. The drug’s mechanism of action remains obscure. No serious side effects have been demonstrated with its use, however, and it is therefore advised in selected patients.

PMID: 3328164 [PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]

Source: http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/3328164


#10

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» I think Ahab already stated this…this study confirms it though. Funny :wink:

Thank you for remembering.

I’ve known this for 25 years, ever since I noticed that after using topical minoxidil on my own scalp for a year, there were no young short hairs growing.

Meaning none of my follices had entered the resting phase, and all that had not previously succumbed to mpb, were growing hair.

That, along with the general observation that minoxidil only seemed to have an effect on people who had thinning hair, and weren’t yet bald, easily led me to conclude that minox only served to keep those follicles as yet untouched by mpb, out of the resting phase.

And my own observation also tells me that the effect wears off after a year or two or three, and the hair resumes cycling anyway, minoxidil or no minoxidil.

I’m almost always right.

You all would benefit from reading my many posts through the years, on everything from senescent alopecia undermining hair transplants to artificial hair implants (why even if they didn’t cause infection, they still wouldn’t look natural–that you’d just be using your own skin as the base for a wig) to the failings of wigs/toupees/hair systems–or whatever euphemism the wig marketers come up with next to the possibility that hair follicles are genetically programmed to cycle only a limited number of times (senescent alopecia being the result of those cycles having reached the limit).


#11

Well, this is productive. Knowing the mechanism means they can work towards exploiting it more efficiently and to greater efficacy.


#12

I would think however that use of propecia/avodart + minoxidil would produce better results. Frankly i don’t see how any treatment can be effective without blocking DHT.

I agree with you that minox keeps the existing follicles in anagen. I wonder if keeping hair follicle continuously in its growing phase (working 24x7 without a rest) is perhaps over-straining the follicle leading later on to its untimely death ? Maybe the hair will go on strike for being over-worked and just quit growing.

I do think however if you have miniturizing hairs on your head even with propecia, you should use minox to revive them to a point where they grow hair shafts of normal diameter and then gradually taper off the life support from minox.


#13

» Well, this is productive. Knowing the mechanism means they can work
» towards exploiting it more efficiently and to greater efficacy.

Of course. The subject (headline) study already SUGGESTS (at least indirect) what you have to do, if you wish to PROLONG (and just to prolong/extent and NOT to “reverse” anything!) the anagen phase (growth phase) of TERMINAL HAIRS producing hair follicles; because treating every other stage/phase (catagen, telogen until shrunken follicles produce just tiny vellus hairs) doesn’t make sense anymore with Minoxidil.

Anyway, to do that (efficient treating with Minox), you have to INJECT Minoxidil directly INTO, or at least very adjacent to ALL single hair follicles within your AGA effected scalp; and you have to do such tedious procedure (for EVERY single ~50,000 – 70,000 hair follicles) at least every 3 or 6 or 12 month (the shorter the periode, the better), in an effort just to PROLONG the anagen phase of your (still healthy) hair follicles to some degree.

Just to rub/smear Minoxidil onto your scalp every day, simply doesn’t have (CAN’T have!) such an efficiency, because …

Anyways, even you increase the efficiency with Minox as described above, would it make sense concerning costs for such continuous procedures, just for slightly prolonging the anagen phase until after x years you will lose those treated hairs anyhow?