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Milk thistle, topically effective?


#1

Skin cancer prevention. One of the most exciting findings of recent years concerns the potential skin-protective effect of milk thistle extracts. Researchers found that topically applied milk thistle extract protects the skin of mice exposed to chemical carcinogens from skin tumor formation.7 Further studies in mice demonstrated that topically applied milk thistle extract protects the skin of mice against ultraviolet light-induced skin cancer.22 Further studies are indicated to explore the potential skin cancer-protective effects of topical application and internal consumption of milk thistle in humans.

http://www.lef.org/magazine/mag2005/nov2005_report_prostate_01.htm

That info is at the very tail end of that article…but the proposed anti-cancer benefit of milk thistle’s silymarin is the inhibition of the egf receptor, stopping cancer from spreading. Interesting. Its not very soluble in water, but an aqeous solution with warm water probably could be made and smeared in hydrated, warm skin without resorting to any potential ‘anti-infective’ agent like an alcohol.


#2

I’m currently using it as the EGF inhibiting agent in my post wounding topical. I’ve also been taking it orally during this ‘embryonic window’.
The references to it inhibiting EGF are clear and my searches cannot find references to it ALSO inhibiting wnt signaling. So it seems that this could be a good choice for EGF inhibition. But what I ask myself is, how does the potency of it’s inhibitory effects match up to Gefitinib? And indeed, is the potency important or does the mere presence push a ‘switch’?

I’m on Day 13 post wounding. After the initial excitement of what I deemed to be re-awakened follicles, I’ve shaved it all clean again, purely for neatness and aesthetic reasons. I’ve spent 2 weeks either hiding indoors or under a hat so it was refreshing to do that and certainly won’t affect any HF formation which I very much hope is occurring as I speak.


#3

I’m sticking to the manmade drugs on this issue. They don’t cost THAT much.

Folica specified a non-natural EGF-R inhibitor. And Folica itself isn’t in the business of producing anything to inhibit the EGF-R one way or the other.

If natural EGF-R inhibitors were likely to work, I would expect Folica to try and cast their patenting net over the natural ones too.


#4

» »
» If natural EGF-R inhibitors were likely to work, I would expect Folica to
» try and cast their patenting net over the natural ones too.

I dont think they can legally do that to be perfectly honest. I’d be suprised if it was found that wounding + grapefruit juice produced hair, that a court would actually say someone had a right to patent grapefruit juice-related hair growth. I could be wrong on that, but it seems unlikely.


#5

That reminds me the infamous Amgen case

see this link its adresses much of your questions : http://query.nytimes.com/gst/fullpage.html?res=9D0CE1DB123CF93AA35750C0A967958260


#6

» I’m sticking to the manmade drugs on this issue. They don’t cost THAT
» much.
»

I want to try a synthetic drug on my next try (assuming I don’t get a headful of hair from this attempt Lol! here’s hoping). What drug are you planning on using? Could you provide a link for a site selling the drug without prescription? Cheers.