Home | News | Find a Doctor | Ask a Question | Free

Lavender for hair loss


#1

Has anyone tried lavender for treating hair loss?


#2

essential oil of lavender. Yes. Daily. Anecdotal against hairloss. Can only contribute to a better scalp health.


#3

» essential oil of lavender. Yes. Daily. Anecdotal against hairloss. Can
» only contribute to a better scalp health.

Lavender has been found to block the androgen receptor and stimulate the estrogen receptor…its also grown breasts on boys who use body washes that have it. It obviously must get systemically absorbed to some extent.

Here are some articles on the matter:

http://www.achs.edu/news/news-detail.aspx?nid=76

The following is a review of a recent small study on lavender oil and its potential estrogenic effects (with associated breast enlargement in young boys) by ACHS Professor Dr. Arianna Staruch ND.

This recent experience highlights that essential oils contain biologically active constituents which can have physiologic effects when used topically. The use of these oils should be by those with appropriate training. Indiscriminate exposure of the public to essential oils may need to be evaluated for possible risks.

Is Lavender Essential Oil Associated with breast enlargement in young boys?

A study published in the NEJM this week raised the possibility that lavender essential oil found in common beauty products had caused breast enlargement (gynecomastia) in three young boys in Colorado. The breast enlargement resolved when the boys stopped using the products. The products all contained lavender essential oil, and included a healing balm, soap, body lotion, shampoo and hair gel. (The shampoo and hair gel also contained tea tree oil.) Hormone levels in all three boys remained normal throughout.

The researchers then tested tea tree and lavender oil in vitro, and both were found to stimulate the estrogen receptor and block the androgen receptor. This kind of disruption of hormone signaling pathways is thought to be responsible for gynecomastia and early puberty associated with known endocrine disruptors such as soy, pharmaceuticals, dioxins, furans, and organohalogens. Assessment of estrogenic activity of essential oil constituents has found that citral and geraniol can bind to estrogen receptors in vitro, but did not show estrogenic activity in a mouse model. Lavender essential oil contains geranyl acetate, a compound related to geraniol.

So was it the lavender that cased the abnormal breast enlargement? We can only suspect but not be sure. Because the gynecomastia resolved when the products were stopped, we can make a strong assumption that the products were the cause. None of the boys had been exposed to any known hormone disruptors including soy. The only obvious similarity in the products was the presence of lavender oil, however even the author of the study states that we cannot rule out that other components in the products also possess endocrine disrupting capability. Lavender essential oil was shown in vitro studies to bind to and stimulate the estrogen receptor but animal studies have not shown that this binding translates to estrogenic activity in vivo. However, children are extremely sensitive to estradiol, and no threshold has been established below which no hormonal effects can be seen in children exposed to known endocrine disruptors.

Does this mean that lavender essential oil is not safe for use in children? Compared to the number of children that are exposed to products containing lavender essential oil every day, only a very few may have had this response. In fact in the reported study, a fraternal twin brother of one of the boys also used the lavender skin lotion, but not the lavender soap, and did not show any signs of gynecomastia. However it is only prudent to be aware that the indiscriminate use of essential oils in frequently used household and beauty products may pose some risk to some children.

Should we change the way use lavender essential oil therapeutically? Lavender essential oil has long been viewed as an oil with few if any contraindications or side effects. In light of this study, maybe we should reconsider the use of lavender during pregnancy, nursing or in those with a history of hormone sensitive cancers.

This recent experience highlights that essential oils contain biologically active constituents, which can have physiologic effects when used topically. The use of these oils should be by those with appropriate training. Indiscriminate exposure of the public to essential oils may need to be evaluated for possible risks. It is recommended that the public seek out a Registered Aromatherapist (RA) by searching the Registered Aromatherapists Register at http://www.aromatherapycouncil.org/index.html. All RA’s have passed the national ARC Registration Examination in Aromatherapy and have completed a minimum of a one year Level 2 program in aromatherapy from a college or school that is in compliance with the current NAHA Educational Guidelines. Registration is a mark of the candidates dedication to the Aromatherapy field and to the safety of his or her clients and customers.

Footnotes:

How do environmental estrogen disruptors induce precocious puberty? Massart, et al; Minerva Pediatr 2006 Jun; 58(3):247

Assessment of estrogenic activity in some common essential oil constituents. Hoews MJ, et al; J. Pharm Pharmacol. 2002 Nov; 54(11):1521

Anticonflict effects of lavender oil and identification of its active constituents. Umezu T; et al; Pharmacol Biochem Behav. 2006 Dec; 85(4):713

The sensitivity of the child to sex steroids: possible impact of exogenous estrogens. Aksglaede L, et al; Hum Reprod Update. 2006 Jul-Aug; 12(4):342

More…http://www.gg … 2/ab19.cfm

"Prepubertal Gynecomastia Linked to Lavender and Tea Tree Oils
« Back to Volume 23, Issue 2, June 2007 - Table of Contents

Print this article
E-mail to a colleague
Prepubertal gynecomastia is rare and should always be considered pathological and worthy of a compete assessment to determine the cause, even though the underlying pathology is not often determined. In the paper by Henley et al, 3 patients were reported in whom the development of gynecomastia was associated with repeated exposure to topical products containing lavender and tea tree oils. Gynecomastia resolved once use of the products ceased. The patients were 4 5/12, 10 1/12, and 7 10/12 years of age and presented gynecomastia of 2-3 weeks, 5 months, and 1 month duration, respectively. They had no exposure to exogenous estrogens (ingestants, salves, or ointments) and did not report using drugs, medications, soy products, herbal supplements, or lotions. Breast sizes were Tanner stage 2, ranging in size from 2.0 to 4.0 cm in diameter and genitalia were prepubertal Tanner stage 1. Laboratory data were unremarkable with normal serum concentrations of sex steroids and other hormones. The mother of one patient reported applying “healing balm” which contained lavender oil daily shortly before breasts were noted. Another patient was applying a styling gel to his hair and scalp every morning and regularly using shampoo, both containing lavandaula angustifolia (lavender) oil and maleleuca alternifolia (tea tree) oil for 9 months. The last patient also used lavender-scented commercial skin lotions and soap intermittently. The gynecomastia was resolved in these 3 patents once these products were discontinued. Furthermore, the authors performed studies in human breast-cancer cell lines MCF-7 and MDA-kb2 to determine the estrogenic and antiandrogenic activities, respectively, of the oils used by the patients to determine if the oils were the culprit in the development of gynecomastia. These cells express estrogen or androgen receptors and were cultured with various concentrations of the lavender and tee tree oil. Luciferase assays, reverse-transciptase, and real time polymerase-chain reactions (PCR) analyses were performed. Both oils stimulated luciferase activity in MCF-1 cells in a dose-dependant manner. The estrogen receptor antagonist, fulvestrant, inhibited the transactivation of the luciferase, indicating that the activity of the oils was estrogen-receptor dependent. Further experiments indicated that the 2 oils modulated the expression of the estrogen regulated endogenous genes in a manner similar to the effect of 1nM 17 beta-estradiol. The potential antiandrogenic properties of lavender and tea tree oil were performed in the MDA-kb2 cells with androgen receptors trans-fected with an androgen-inducible reporter plasmid. Neither lavender or tea tree oil transactivated the luciferase reporter plasmid at any concentration tested; whereas the cells with the androgen-receptor agonist dihydrotestosterone (DHT) expressed an increase in luciferase activity that was almost 4 times greater than the controls. Transactivation of the luciferase reporter plasmid by 0.1 nM DHT was inhibited by both lavender and tea tree oil in a concentration dependent manner and inhibited androgen inducible genes. The antiandrogenic properties of the oils did not cause down regulation of the expression of the androgen receptors. The authors concluded that lavender and tea tree oils contain endocrine-disrupting activity that cause an imbalance in estrogen and androgen pathway signaling resulting in prepubertal gynecomastia.

Henley DV, Lipson N, Korach KS, Bloch CA. Prepubertal Gynecomastia Linked to Lavender and Tea Tree Oils. New Eng J Med. 2007;356:479-85."


#4

» » essential oil of lavender. Yes. Daily. Anecdotal against hairloss. Can
» » only contribute to a better scalp health.
»
»
»
»
» Lavender has been found to block the androgen receptor and stimulate the
» estrogen receptor…its also grown breasts on boys
» who use body washes that have it. It obviously must get systemically
» absorbed to some extent.
»
»
»
»
» Here are some articles on the matter:
»
»
» http://www.achs.edu/news/news-detail.aspx?nid=76
»
»
»
» The following is a review of a recent small study on lavender oil and its
» potential estrogenic effects (with associated breast enlargement in young
» boys) by ACHS Professor Dr. Arianna Staruch ND.
»
» This recent experience highlights that essential oils contain biologically
» active constituents which can have physiologic effects when used topically.
» The use of these oils should be by those with appropriate training.
» Indiscriminate exposure of the public to essential oils may need to be
» evaluated for possible risks.
»
» Is Lavender Essential Oil Associated with breast enlargement in young
» boys?
»
» A study published in the NEJM this week raised the possibility that
» lavender essential oil found in common beauty products had caused breast
» enlargement (gynecomastia) in three young boys in Colorado. The breast
» enlargement resolved when the boys stopped using the products. The products
» all contained lavender essential oil, and included a healing balm, soap,
» body lotion, shampoo and hair gel. (The shampoo and hair gel also contained
» tea tree oil.) Hormone levels in all three boys remained normal throughout.
»
»
» The researchers then tested tea tree and lavender oil in
» vitro, and both were found to stimulate the estrogen receptor and block the
» androgen receptor.
This kind of disruption of hormone signaling
» pathways is thought to be responsible for gynecomastia and early puberty
» associated with known endocrine disruptors such as soy, pharmaceuticals,
» dioxins, furans, and organohalogens. Assessment of estrogenic activity of
» essential oil constituents has found that citral and geraniol can bind to
» estrogen receptors in vitro, but did not show estrogenic activity in a
» mouse model. Lavender essential oil contains geranyl acetate, a compound
» related to geraniol.
»
» So was it the lavender that cased the abnormal breast enlargement? We can
» only suspect but not be sure. Because the gynecomastia resolved when the
» products were stopped, we can make a strong assumption that the products
» were the cause. None of the boys had been exposed to any known hormone
» disruptors including soy. The only obvious similarity in the products was
» the presence of lavender oil, however even the author of the study states
» that we cannot rule out that other components in the products also possess
» endocrine disrupting capability. Lavender essential oil was shown in vitro
» studies to bind to and stimulate the estrogen receptor but animal studies
» have not shown that this binding translates to estrogenic activity in vivo.
» However, children are extremely sensitive to estradiol, and no threshold
» has been established below which no hormonal effects can be seen in
» children exposed to known endocrine disruptors.
»
» Does this mean that lavender essential oil is not safe for use in
» children? Compared to the number of children that are exposed to products
» containing lavender essential oil every day, only a very few may have had
» this response. In fact in the reported study, a fraternal twin brother of
» one of the boys also used the lavender skin lotion, but not the lavender
» soap, and did not show any signs of gynecomastia. However it is only
» prudent to be aware that the indiscriminate use of essential oils in
» frequently used household and beauty products may pose some risk to some
» children.
»
» Should we change the way use lavender essential oil therapeutically?
» Lavender essential oil has long been viewed as an oil with few if any
» contraindications or side effects. In light of this study, maybe we should
» reconsider the use of lavender during pregnancy, nursing or in those with a
» history of hormone sensitive cancers.
»
» This recent experience highlights that essential oils contain biologically
» active constituents, which can have physiologic effects when used
» topically. The use of these oils should be by those with appropriate
» training. Indiscriminate exposure of the public to essential oils may need
» to be evaluated for possible risks. It is recommended that the public seek
» out a Registered Aromatherapist (RA) by searching the Registered
» Aromatherapists Register at http://www.aromatherapycouncil.org/index.html.
» All RA’s have passed the national ARC Registration Examination in
» Aromatherapy and have completed a minimum of a one year Level 2 program in
» aromatherapy from a college or school that is in compliance with the
» current NAHA Educational Guidelines. Registration is a mark of the
» candidates dedication to the Aromatherapy field and to the safety of his or
» her clients and customers.
»
» Footnotes:
»
» How do environmental estrogen disruptors induce precocious puberty?
» Massart, et al; Minerva Pediatr 2006 Jun; 58(3):247
»
» Assessment of estrogenic activity in some common essential oil
» constituents. Hoews MJ, et al; J. Pharm Pharmacol. 2002 Nov; 54(11):1521
»
» Anticonflict effects of lavender oil and identification of its active
» constituents. Umezu T; et al; Pharmacol Biochem Behav. 2006 Dec; 85(4):713
»
» The sensitivity of the child to sex steroids: possible impact of exogenous
» estrogens. Aksglaede L, et al; Hum Reprod Update. 2006 Jul-Aug; 12(4):342
»
»
»
»
»
» More…http://www.gg … 2/ab19.cfm
»
»
» “Prepubertal Gynecomastia Linked to Lavender and Tea Tree Oils
» « Back to Volume 23, Issue 2, June 2007 - Table of Contents
»
» Print this article
» E-mail to a colleague
» Prepubertal gynecomastia is rare and should always be considered
» pathological and worthy of a compete assessment to determine the cause,
» even though the underlying pathology is not often determined. In the paper
» by Henley et al, 3 patients were reported in whom the development of
» gynecomastia was associated with repeated exposure to topical products
» containing lavender and tea tree oils. Gynecomastia resolved once use of
» the products ceased. The patients were 4 5/12, 10 1/12, and 7 10/12 years
» of age and presented gynecomastia of 2-3 weeks, 5 months, and 1 month
» duration, respectively. They had no exposure to exogenous estrogens
» (ingestants, salves, or ointments) and did not report using drugs,
» medications, soy products, herbal supplements, or lotions. Breast sizes
» were Tanner stage 2, ranging in size from 2.0 to 4.0 cm in diameter and
» genitalia were prepubertal Tanner stage 1. Laboratory data were
» unremarkable with normal serum concentrations of sex steroids and other
» hormones. The mother of one patient reported applying “healing balm” which
» contained lavender oil daily shortly before breasts were noted. Another
» patient was applying a styling gel to his hair and scalp every morning and
» regularly using shampoo, both containing lavandaula angustifolia (lavender)
» oil and maleleuca alternifolia (tea tree) oil for 9 months. The last
» patient also used lavender-scented commercial skin lotions and soap
» intermittently. The gynecomastia was resolved in these 3 patents once these
» products were discontinued. Furthermore, the authors performed studies in
» human breast-cancer cell lines MCF-7 and MDA-kb2 to determine the
» estrogenic and antiandrogenic activities, respectively, of the oils used by
» the patients to determine if the oils were the culprit in the development
» of gynecomastia. These cells express estrogen or androgen receptors and
» were cultured with various concentrations of the lavender and tee tree oil.
» Luciferase assays, reverse-transciptase, and real time polymerase-chain
» reactions (PCR) analyses were performed. Both oils stimulated luciferase
» activity in MCF-1 cells in a dose-dependant manner. The estrogen receptor
» antagonist, fulvestrant, inhibited the transactivation of the luciferase,
» indicating that the activity of the oils was estrogen-receptor dependent.
» Further experiments indicated that the 2 oils modulated the expression of
» the estrogen regulated endogenous genes in a manner similar to the effect
» of 1nM 17 beta-estradiol. The potential antiandrogenic properties of
» lavender and tea tree oil were performed in the MDA-kb2 cells with androgen
» receptors trans-fected with an androgen-inducible reporter plasmid. Neither
» lavender or tea tree oil transactivated the luciferase reporter plasmid at
» any concentration tested; whereas the cells with the androgen-receptor
» agonist dihydrotestosterone (DHT) expressed an increase in luciferase
» activity that was almost 4 times greater than the controls. Transactivation
» of the luciferase reporter plasmid by 0.1 nM DHT was inhibited by both
» lavender and tea tree oil in a concentration dependent manner and inhibited
» androgen inducible genes. The antiandrogenic properties of the oils did not
» cause down regulation of the expression of the androgen receptors. The
» authors concluded that lavender and tea tree oils contain
» endocrine-disrupting activity that cause an imbalance in estrogen and
» androgen pathway signaling resulting in prepubertal gynecomastia.
»
» Henley DV, Lipson N, Korach KS, Bloch CA. Prepubertal Gynecomastia Linked
» to Lavender and Tea Tree Oils. New Eng J Med. 2007;356:479-85.”

Have you ever used it yourself???


#5

Essential oil of lavender daily for the past five years: Anecdotal against hairloss. May have contributed to better scalp health.


#6

» » » »
»
»
» Have you ever used it yourself???

I experimented with lavender on my right big toe hair (Im a fairly hairy man, like alot of men with MPB-genetics). I was hoping to see a reduction in the toe hair, but it actually seemed to stimulate it and it was longer and a bit darker than the left big-toe’s hair at three months.

This may have been due to stimulating the estrogen receptor, or some other property of lavender (maybe it ups NO, ups this mitogen, suppresses that antigen or whatever).

The classic four essential oils that have been used for (in cedarwood oil’s case thousands) of years are Cedarwood, rosemary, thyme, lavender. Other essential oils are used in hair, but those four are the one’s that appear in almost every old remedy you can look up.

Let me show you what is “known” about them.

Cedarwood reduces sebum in human skin (thus why Im testing it on my chin to see if its an anti-androgen…takes about three months to really tell very clearly). A patent is taken out by Johnson and Johnson for .6 percent cedarwood oil to this effect.
Cedarwood oil also gets alot of either NO or oxygen released where applied (read that somewhere online, but Im not going to relook it up now).

Rosemary is a particularily potent anti-oxidant. Its a complicated substance with about 300 chemicals therein. There is some caffeic acid in rosemary, which is a superstrong alpha five reductase inhibitor, but there may not be enough to do much in it.

Thyme is known to inhibit prostaglandin formation. Latanaprost, a drug with a hypertrichotic effect, also is a prostaglandin analogue. Ketoconazole inhibits a couple of prostaglandins…so thyme is probably a stimulant.

I would worry about rosemary getting systemically absorbed if one used alot of it over time…it caused gyno in those boys, so it got lower than the dermis when they were merely using bodywashes with it. Maybe its cool to use it on the head, I really dont know. If it can stimulate the estrogen receptor, it might keep scalp hair in the growth phase longer. These oils have alot of different chemicals within them…so its really hard to say what all they do unless rigorously tested.

There is a pic in the Archives of Dermatology however of a man using the four classic essential oils for alopecia areata…he appears to have complete regrowth when he was totally bald from it. Its a scottish study and if you google “scottish alopecia areata study essential oils” you’ll probably get to see it. Ive posted it before…


#7

You have mentioned about the classic four essential oils ----
Whats your comment on jojoba oil?


#8

I personally use all of the mentionned oils plus a few others. I have no doubt that it potentiates the effects of the topicals I use (minox revivogen). But, whereas I use them daily (since 2002), they couldn’t do a thing against the 400 daily shed I had in february after reducing fin from 2.5mg to 2mg and eliminating nettle root.


#9

I use it in my homemade shampoo together with rosemary, thyme, nettle, polygium multiflorum and licorice root


#10

apologies…2 mg of what?


#11

» I use it in my homemade shampoo together with rosemary, thyme, nettle,
» polygium multiflorum and licorice root

Epilatory Effect of Glycyrrhizic Acid
Zaper, Julijana;1 Kakadjanova, Aina;1 Pfeffer, Jeannette;1
Kippenberger, Stefan;1 Bereiter-Hahn, Juergen;2 Kaufmann,
Roland;1 Bernd, August;1

  1. J.W. Goethe University, Dept. of Dermatology, Frankfurt/
    M., Germany; 2. J.W. Goethe University, Dept. of Zoology,
    Frankfurt/M., Germany
    Hypertrichosis, hirsutism and giant hairy nevus are well
    known examples of abnormal hair growth with some
    risk of a significant negative impact on the psychosocial
    development of affected people. So far, all known methods
    for hair removal are more or less effective and show
    partly considerable side effects like pain, skin irritation,
    contact eczema, folliculitis, and hyper-pigmentation. In
    co-operation with a study group of Turkmenistan we found
    a new principle of painless and rapid hair removal based on
    liquorice, a commonly used herbal extract of the traditional
    Asian medicine. In the meantime we defined the liquorice
    compound glycyrrhizic acid to be responsible for the
    epilatory effect. We dissolved 15% glycyrrhizic acid in an
    aqueous solution containing 10% urea and 20% ethanol
    and treated wistar rats in the neck region twice a day.
    After 3 days first indications for hair loss became visible.
    After 6-12 days the treated skin was nearly free of hairs
    without any sign of skin irritation. Even after a periodically
    long term treatment over one year no abnormality of the
    skin surface was visible, but a permanent reduction in
    re-growing hair quantity by more than 50%. Based on
    these findings Glycyrrhizic acid is a candidate molecule
    for the development of a powerful agent for painless and
    permanent hair removal.

Licorice apparently done something rather permanent to these rats hair long after treatment had ceased…the hair should have rown back, not a good sign.

I fear that peppermint oil might also do something long-term harmful to hair (I hope Im wrong about that), but so many Revita users (has two menthol extracts in it) were so dissapointed, that it makes me wonder. When I experimented with peppermint oil/water on my beard hair, it reduced the beard on the right side of my chin at three months profoundly as compared with my left…and it has taken a long time to rebound and still hasn’t completely rebounded a year later. Makes me wonder.


#12

I have noticed that when I use anything (shampoo) containing menthol or mint that it seems to have a negative effect on my hair. Shedding seems to increase along with scalp inflammation. Any shampoo that gives me a “cool” feeling seems to do the same thing. Revita was very dissappointing, but I really didn’t expect much from DS Laboratories.


#13

» I have noticed that when I use anything (shampoo) containing menthol or
» mint that it seems to have a negative effect on my hair. Shedding seems to
» increase along with scalp inflammation. Any shampoo that gives me a “cool”
» feeling seems to do the same thing. Revita was very dissappointing, but I
» really didn’t expect much from DS Laboratories.

I have really wondered about whether peppermint might do something harmful to hair…I can see that it might be both anti-andrgogenic (the Japanese study, the Turkish hirsutism study, the complaints of no libido in men who drink peppermint tea, what I saw on my beard), but still do something to alter the hair cycle (upreg some anti-gen or suppress some crucial anagen inducer, etc).

You know menthol is in Revivogen…maybe thats why the responses to what should be a very effective topical anti-androgen based on the free form fatty acids and sterols therein aren’t what they seemingly would be. On paper, revivogen ought to be alot more successful in men than what these forums reflect. I wonder if the menthol and any of the other ingredients inhibit it from being as good as it should be (like zinc or azeliac acid for instance).


#14

Let me reprint the Scottish study with essential oils first:

Randomized Trial of Aromatherapy
Successful Treatment for Alopecia Areata

Isabelle C. Hay, MRCP; Margaret Jamieson, SRN; Anthony D. Ormerod, FRCP

Arch Dermatol. 1998;134:1349-1352.

Objective To investigate the efficacy of aromatherapy in the treatment of patients with alopecia areata.

Design A randomized, double-blind, controlled trial of 7 months’ duration, with follow-up at 3 and 7 months.

Setting Dermatology outpatient department.

Participants Eighty-six patients diagnosed as having alopecia areata.

Intervention Eighty-six patients were randomized into 2 groups. The active group massaged essential oils (thyme, rosemary, lavender, and cedarwood) in a mixture of carrier oils (jojoba and grapeseed) into their scalp daily. The control group used only carrier oils for their massage, also daily.

Main Outcome Measures Treatment success was evaluated on sequential photographs by 2 dermatologists (I.C.H. and A.D.O.) independently. Similarly, the degree of improvement was measured by 2 methods: a 6-point scale and computerized analysis of traced areas of alopecia.

Results Nineteen (44%) of 43 patients in the active group showed improvement compared with 6 (15%) of 41 patients in the control group (P=.008). An alopecia scale was applied by blinded observers on sequential photographs and was shown to be reproducible with good interobserver agreement (=0.84). The degree of improvement on photographic assessment was significant (P=.05). Demographic analysis showed that the 2 groups were well matched for prognostic factors.

Conclusions The results show aromatherapy to be a safe and effective treatment for alopecia areata. Treatment with these essential oils was significantly more effective than treatment with the carrier oil alone (P=.008 for the primary outcome measure). We also successfully applied an evidence-based method to an alternative therapy.

From the Department of Dermatology, Aberdeen Royal Infirmary, Foresterhill, Aberdeen, Scotland.

Me again Hairsite…15% of the alopecia areata patients had an improvement with the carrier oils (jojoba and grapeseed) vs. 44% with the cedar, thyme, rosemary, lavender with the carrier oils. This is alopecia areata…an immune-related alopecia that is apparently very tricky to treat.

I dont know if Ive ever heard of jojoba being found to be anti-androgenic in any way, but one does read about it “regulating sebum” ancedotally quite a bit with it. I know its similar to human sebum and is supposed to help “break up hardened sebum” in hair shafts-----but I dont know if I believe that. Its acknoledged by many to be “good for hair” but Im not certain about what it does. Perhaps its just a very good carrier to get other oils into the skin, BUT Ive noticed that cedarwood, lavender, and rosemary (not sure about thyme) are all ethanol soluble…so one seemingly really wouldn’t need a carrier oil with them, but could rather merely mix them in everclear or some other ethanol. Oils, due to the molecules being so small, shouldn’t have a hard time penetrating the dermis anyway, especially a hydrated dermis with warm water.


#15

» Let me reprint the Scottish study with essential oils first:
»
»
»
»
»
»
»
» Randomized Trial of Aromatherapy
» Successful Treatment for Alopecia Areata
»
» Isabelle C. Hay, MRCP; Margaret Jamieson, SRN; Anthony D. Ormerod, FRCP
»
»
» Arch Dermatol. 1998;134:1349-1352.
»
» Objective To investigate the efficacy of aromatherapy in the treatment of
» patients with alopecia areata.
»
» Design A randomized, double-blind, controlled trial of 7 months’
» duration, with follow-up at 3 and 7 months.
»
» Setting Dermatology outpatient department.
»
» Participants Eighty-six patients diagnosed as having alopecia areata.
»
» Intervention Eighty-six patients were randomized into 2 groups. The
» active group massaged essential oils (thyme, rosemary, lavender, and
» cedarwood) in a mixture of carrier oils (jojoba and grapeseed) into their
» scalp daily. The control group used only carrier oils for
» their massage, also daily.

»
» Main Outcome Measures Treatment success was evaluated on sequential
» photographs by 2 dermatologists (I.C.H. and A.D.O.) independently.
» Similarly, the degree of improvement was measured by 2 methods: a 6-point
» scale and computerized analysis of traced areas of alopecia.
»
» Results Nineteen (44%) of 43 patients in the active group
» showed improvement compared with 6 (15%) of 41 patients in the control
» group (P=.008).
An alopecia scale was applied by blinded
» observers on sequential photographs and was shown to be reproducible with
» good interobserver agreement (=0.84). The degree of improvement on
» photographic assessment was significant (P=.05). Demographic analysis
» showed that the 2 groups were well matched for prognostic factors.
»
» Conclusions The results show aromatherapy to be a safe and effective
» treatment for alopecia areata. Treatment with these essential oils was
» significantly more effective than treatment with the carrier oil alone
» (P=.008 for the primary outcome measure). We also successfully applied an
» evidence-based method to an alternative therapy.
»
»
» From the Department of Dermatology, Aberdeen Royal Infirmary,
» Foresterhill, Aberdeen, Scotland.
»
»
»
»
» Me again Hairsite…15% of the alopecia areata
» patients had an improvement with the carrier oils (jojoba and grapeseed)
» vs. 44% with the cedar, thyme, rosemary, lavender with the carrier oils.
» This is alopecia areata…an immune-related alopecia that is
» apparently very tricky to treat.
»
» I dont know if Ive ever heard of jojoba being found to be anti-androgenic
» in any way, but one does read about it “regulating sebum” ancedotally quite
» a bit with it. I know its similar to human sebum and is supposed to help
» “break up hardened sebum” in hair shafts-----but I dont know if I believe
» that. Its acknoledged by many to be “good for hair” but Im not certain
» about what it does. Perhaps its just a very good carrier to get other oils
» into the skin, BUT Ive noticed that cedarwood, lavender, and rosemary (not
» sure about thyme) are all ethanol soluble…so one
» seemingly really wouldn’t need a carrier oil with them, but could rather
» merely mix them in everclear or some other ethanol. Oils, due to the
» molecules being so small, shouldn’t have a hard time penetrating the dermis
» anyway, especially a hydrated dermis with warm water.

Couldnt one just mix the essential oils in with minoxidil?


#16

Multi-component formulas often leave me wondering the same thing. Are there components that are actually inhibiting the positive effects of other components. A prime example of this might be minoxidil with Retin-A. Is the Retin-A initially working synergystically with the minoxidil and, over time, diminishing the positive effects of the minoxidil?


#17

Any precautions to be taken while using these essential oils?

I read in the literature that rosemary oil should be avoided if you have high blood pressure.