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Latest Harvard Medical School Newsletter discusses upcoming hair loss treatments


#1

http://www.newswise.com/articles/view/543239/

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For people experiencing hair loss, there’s a mix of encouraging and discouraging news. No drug treatments have gained FDA approval since 1997, and the most effective therapy, a hair transplant, is expensive. But transplants now offer increasingly satisfying results thanks to improved surgical techniques, and recent biotechnology discoveries may lead to less invasive treatments, reports the August 2008 issue of the Harvard Health Letter.

Newswise — For people experiencing hair loss, there’s a mix of encouraging and discouraging news. No drug treatments have gained FDA approval since 1997, and the most effective therapy, a hair transplant, is expensive. But transplants now offer increasingly satisfying results thanks to improved surgical techniques, and recent biotechnology discoveries may lead to less invasive treatments, reports the August 2008 issue of the Harvard Health Letter.

The FDA has approved two drugs, minoxidil (Rogaine) and finasteride (Propecia), to slow hair loss or regrow hair. Propecia is more effective than Rogaine, but it’s more expensive. A major drawback of both is that you need to keep on taking them to sustain the benefits.

Hair transplants involve removing hair follicles from the sides of the head and implanting them in bald or thinning areas. One of the main obstacles is money—surgery costs $8,000 to $12,000. Transplants have improved over the years, making for a more natural hairline by continuing the trend toward smaller and smaller grafts.

Several drugs that preserve the health of hair follicles are in the pipeline. In addition, companies hope to find ways to create new hair follicles from scratch. One potential method involves using an abrasive gel to gently damage the skin and then topical cream to switch on the follicle-generating genes. Another possibility is a technique in which hair-forming cells are extracted, multiplied, and replanted into the scalp.

You can find plenty of treatments for hair loss on the Internet. Some are “specially formulated” shampoos sold along with saw palmetto herbal supplements. But there’s not much evidence that these work.


#2

Several drugs that preserve the health of hair follicles are in the pipeline. In addition, companies hope to find ways to create new hair follicles from scratch. One potential method involves using an abrasive gel to gently damage the skin and then topical cream to switch on the follicle-generating genes. Another possibility is a technique in which hair-forming cells are extracted, multiplied, and replanted into the scalp.

hmmm. I wonder if that’s a hint of the final Follica process?

.


#3

» http://www.newswise.com/articles/view/543239/
»
» Contact Information
» Available for logged-in reporters only
»
» Description
» For people experiencing hair loss, there’s a mix of encouraging and
» discouraging news. No drug treatments have gained FDA approval since 1997,
» and the most effective therapy, a hair transplant, is expensive. But
» transplants now offer increasingly satisfying results thanks to improved
» surgical techniques, and recent biotechnology discoveries may lead to less
» invasive treatments, reports the August 2008 issue of the Harvard Health
» Letter.
»
» Newswise — For people experiencing hair loss, there’s a mix of encouraging
» and discouraging news. No drug treatments have gained FDA approval since
» 1997, and the most effective therapy, a hair transplant, is expensive. But
» transplants now offer increasingly satisfying results thanks to improved
» surgical techniques, and recent biotechnology discoveries may lead to less
» invasive treatments, reports the August 2008 issue of the Harvard Health
» Letter.
»
» The FDA has approved two drugs, minoxidil (Rogaine) and finasteride
» (Propecia), to slow hair loss or regrow hair. Propecia is more effective
» than Rogaine, but it’s more expensive. A major drawback of both is that you
» need to keep on taking them to sustain the benefits.
»
» Hair transplants involve removing hair follicles from the sides of the
» head and implanting them in bald or thinning areas. One of the main
» obstacles is money—surgery costs $8,000 to $12,000. Transplants have
» improved over the years, making for a more natural hairline by continuing
» the trend toward smaller and smaller grafts.
»
» Several drugs that preserve the health of hair follicles are in the
» pipeline. In addition, companies hope to find ways to create new hair
» follicles from scratch. One potential method involves using an abrasive gel
» to gently damage the skin and then topical cream to switch on the
» follicle-generating genes. Another possibility is a technique in which
» hair-forming cells are extracted, multiplied, and replanted into the
» scalp.
»
» You can find plenty of treatments for hair loss on the Internet. Some are
» “specially formulated” shampoos sold along with saw palmetto herbal
» supplements. But there’s not much evidence that these work.

thats a pretty succinct summary of where we are at----they dont have the info on ACELL…but other than that, its pretty straight. They neglect to mention ketoconazole, however, and I think the photographs from the Japanese trial speak for themselves there. Its obviously helpful


#4

8,000 to 12,000? I guess they’re figuring the average there because I would consider that somewhat inexpensive. I wouldn’t mind having 3,000 grafts for around that price.


#5

» http://www.newswise.com/articles/view/543239/
»
» Contact Information
» Available for logged-in reporters only
»
» Description
» For people experiencing hair loss, there’s a mix of encouraging and
» discouraging news. No drug treatments have gained FDA approval since 1997,
» and the most effective therapy, a hair transplant, is expensive. But
» transplants now offer increasingly satisfying results thanks to improved
» surgical techniques, and recent biotechnology discoveries may lead to less
» invasive treatments, reports the August 2008 issue of the Harvard Health
» Letter.
»
» Newswise — For people experiencing hair loss, there’s a mix of encouraging
» and discouraging news. No drug treatments have gained FDA approval since
» 1997, and the most effective therapy, a hair transplant, is expensive. But
» transplants now offer increasingly satisfying results thanks to improved
» surgical techniques, and recent biotechnology discoveries may lead to less
» invasive treatments, reports the August 2008 issue of the Harvard Health
» Letter.
»
» The FDA has approved two drugs, minoxidil (Rogaine) and finasteride
» (Propecia), to slow hair loss or regrow hair. Propecia is more effective
» than Rogaine, but it’s more expensive. A major drawback of both is that you
» need to keep on taking them to sustain the benefits.
»
» Hair transplants involve removing hair follicles from the sides of the
» head and implanting them in bald or thinning areas. One of the main
» obstacles is money—surgery costs $8,000 to $12,000. Transplants have
» improved over the years, making for a more natural hairline by continuing
» the trend toward smaller and smaller grafts.
»
» Several drugs that preserve the health of hair follicles are in the
» pipeline. In addition, companies hope to find ways to create new hair
» follicles from scratch. One potential method involves using an abrasive gel
» to gently damage the skin and then topical cream to switch on the
» follicle-generating genes. Another possibility is a technique in which
» hair-forming cells are extracted, multiplied, and replanted into the
» scalp.
»
» You can find plenty of treatments for hair loss on the Internet. Some are
» “specially formulated” shampoos sold along with saw palmetto herbal
» supplements. But there’s not much evidence that these work.

They failed to mention the HairMax Laser, which did recently get FDA-approval for the treatment of hair loss. And, even though not FDA-approved yet for hairloss, they also failed to mention Dutasteride.


#6

» They failed to mention the HairMax Laser, which did recently get
» FDA-approval for the treatment of hair loss. And, even though not
» FDA-approved yet for hairloss, they also failed to mention Dutasteride.

Correct me if I’m wrong, but I don’t think Dutasteride is cleared for hairloss just yet (and much like propecia it won’t put a full head of hair on anyone’s head). The HairMax Laser must be an April Fools joke… I think it was only cleared for safely, NOT results. Anyways, they didn’t mention every possible cure in that article, but you’re missing what they DID mention.

Remember Follica trials will be conducted with the help of the Harvard Department of Dermatology, they’re privy to some Follica information, that link is to the latest Harvard Health publication, and it makes mention of a potential method that involves using an abrasive gel to gently damage the skin and then topical cream to switch on the follicle-generating genes. Draw your own conclusions, but I think they let the cat out of the bag… with regards to where Follica is heading.

.


#7

» Remember Follica trials will be conducted with the help of the Harvard
» Department of Dermatology, they’re privy to some Follica information, that
» link is to the latest Harvard Health publication, and it makes mention of a
» potential method that involves using an abrasive gel to gently damage
» the skin and then topical cream to switch on the follicle-generating
» genes
. Draw your own conclusions, but I think they let the cat out of
» the bag… with regards to where Follica is heading.

OK that link did make the idea that this may be some newer/previously undisclosed info regarding Follica more plausible. On the other hand it could be from Follica’s early ideas. I dont think they are that far along yet.
However it could be that the recent stuff about trials for dermabrasion are looking are going to look at the effectiveness of an abrasive gel. On the other hand I have heard good arguments that they will probably opt for a laser to make the wound seeing as one of the founders of Follica is apparently a big name in the development of medical lasers.
hh


#8

»
» hmmm. I wonder if that’s a hint of the final Follica process?
»
it also suggests that the wounding only needs to be gentle. I’ll keep that in mind on my upcoming attempt.
»
»
» .