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ICX-TRC failure


#1

From the internet <>

“One method of hair cloning has been to inject fibroblasts (that have been multiplied in cell culture) into the skin. The hope is that they will interact with the existing skin cells, particularly the keratinocytes, to induce new hairs to form. This procedure, tried in animal models, has been only modestly successful in producing cosmetically acceptable hair.


#2

»
» One method of hair cloning has been to inject fibroblasts (that have been
» multiplied in cell culture) into the skin. The hope is that they
» will interact with the existing skin cells, particularly the
» keratinocytes, to induce new hairs to form. This procedure, tried in
» animal models, has been only modestly successful in producing
» cosmetically acceptable hair.

is this referring to icx-trc? as far as i know the trc trials has been made on humans not on animals.


#3

which is the source of this news…? not a link to another forum… the site of the society that have released the document…

Animals? It’s years that TRC is tried on human! Maybe is another technique?


#4

/NT


#5

» /NT


#6

» This procedure, tried in
» animal models

this is not icx-trc


#7

» » This procedure, tried in
» » animal models
»
» this is not icx-trc

Someones opinion


#8

» » » This procedure, tried in
» » » animal models
» »
» » this is not icx-trc
»
»
» Someones opinion

He’s right. It’s NOT TRC. Fibroblast injections are more usually associated with facial rejuvenation products such as Isolagen. Isolagen themselves were experimenting with using the fibroblasts to produce hair, not very successfully it seems.


#9

Is Dr. Bernstein credible?

http://www.bernsteinmedical.com/newsletter-issue01.php


#10

» Is Dr. Bernstein credible?

Yes, he need HM more than some of us :smiley:


#11

ICX is tryng oh human by 7 years… or more!


#12

Interesting. I’m surprised this hasn’t generated more conversation.

So now we know it was Dr. Bernstein who wrote this.

He’s obviously talking about Intercytex, and specifically, about the two protocols intercytex is working on.

The latter one he mentions would then be the in vitro protocol we’ve been talking about recently.

So, to the experts here, does his description of the two respective procedures ring true (ie, the fibroblasts, etc…). If not, what is he talking about.

One thing I find a little odd is that he seems to imply (though not outright) that the first procedure has only been tried in animal models, when of course as we know, ICX has been working with humans for years.

"One method of hair cloning has been to inject fibroblasts (that have been multiplied in cell culture) into the skin. The hope is that they will interact with the existing skin cells, particularly the keratinocytes, to induce new hairs to form. This procedure, tried in animal models, has been only modestly successful in producing cosmetically acceptable hair.

In the new procedure, dermal cells and keratinocytes, introduced to each other in a test tube, form small hair-like structures that contain a dermal papilla, matrix and an under-developed hair shaft a Proto-hair. With the proper conditions, Proto-hairs will take approximately 5 to 7 days to form. When they are implanted back into the skin, visible hairs have appeared in 10-14 days. So far this research has only been performed in animal models.[/[/i]i]


#13

The quote has been around a while. It’s not current to the ICX-TRC work.

The TRC hairs have yet to be publicized in grown-out form, but the current word is at least saying that the hairs look totally normal.


#14

» The quote has been around a while. It’s not current to the ICX-TRC work.
»
»
» The TRC hairs have yet to be publicized in grown-out form, but the current
» word is at least saying that the hairs look totally normal.

It looks like this quote is from September, 2007, and is referring directly to the ICX presentation at the conference.


#15

Hmm . . . maybe I’m thinking of something similar that was said earlier.