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How strong is donor dominance? Proof


#1

Here is a study in which dark hairs from the back of the head are moved into areas affected by greying. The dark hairs have stayed dark in one patient TEN YEARS after implantation…showing the hair retains its characteristics, its resistance to Male Pattern Baldness INDIVDIUALLY based on the area of the head that it came from.

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Donor Site Dominance in Action:

Transplanted Hairs Retain Their Original

Hair Pigmentation Long-Term

Dinh, Hope V.;1 Sinclair, Rodney;1 Martinick, Jennifer;2

  1. Department of Dermatology, St Vincent’s Hospital,

Melbourne, VIC, Australia; 2. New Hair Clinic, Nedlands,

Perth, WA, Australia

The concept of ‘donor dominance’ in hair transplantation

refers to autografts which continue to maintain their

integrity and characteristics after transplantation to a new

site. Such hairs may retain their original texture and rate of

growth. Hair transplantation for patients with androgenetic

alopecia rely on this concept of donor dominance for a

successful and long-lasting result. Recently, the concept

of ‘recipient dominance’ in hair transplantation has been

debated. In a study of patterns after hair transplantation to

the scalp and eyebrows in patients affected by madarosis,

Lee et al found that the greying rate of hairs approximated

the recipient site rather than the donor site.

We report on the long-term maintenance of follicular

pigmentation in transplanted hairs. We describe two

patients affected by both androgenetic alopecia and hair

greying in the transplant recipient area. They were given

autografts of normally pigmented hair follicles harvested

from the occipital area. More than one year posttransplantation,

their donor hairs have remained pigmented

long-term, despite being implanted in scalp affected by

greying. In one patient the pigmented hairs have remained

stable for 10 years. As the process of greying usually affects

the temporal scalp .rst, then progresses onto the vertex


#2

» Here is a study in which dark hairs from the back of the head are moved
» into areas affected by greying. The dark hairs have stayed dark in one
» patient TEN YEARS after implantation…showing
» the hair retains its characteristics, its resistance to Male Pattern
» Baldness INDIVDIUALLY based on the area of the head that it came from.

That’s all very nice.

But what most people don’t know, is that even hair in the donor area often (usually?) thins with age, whether transplanted or not.

For example, Norwood 5 since my mid twenties, I have since seen a diffuse thinning in most of the donor area on my head, which has been reflected in the thinning of my transplants as well.

So HT thickness in many (or even most or all) people, will worsen with time.

This isn’t necessarily mpb at work–it is more likely senescent alopecia (look it up).

I noticed this thinning start when I entered my 40’s, about 12 years after my transplants, and it continues to worsen with age.


#3

» » Here is a study in which dark hairs from the back of the head are moved
» » into areas affected by greying. The dark hairs have stayed dark in one
» » patient TEN YEARS after
» implantation…showing
» » the hair retains its characteristics, its resistance to Male Pattern
» » Baldness INDIVDIUALLY based on the area of the head that it came from.
»
»
» That’s all very nice.
»
»
» But what most people don’t know, is that even hair in the donor area often
» (usually?) thins with age, whether transplanted or not.
»
» For example, Norwood 5 since my mid twenties, I have since seen a diffuse
» thinning in most of the donor area on my head, which has been reflected in
» the thinning of my transplants as well.
»
» So HT thickness in many (or even most or all) people, will worsen with
» time.
»
» This isn’t necessarily mpb at work–it is more likely senescent alopecia
» (look it up).
»
» I noticed this thinning start when I entered my 40’s, about 12 years after
» my transplants, and it continues to worsen with age.

This is because you were sold a false bill of goods about the so-called “donor-area”. It indeed does get thinner with age. Look at pictures of Dick Cheney…his “wreath hair” was much thicker in the 1970s when he was younger than what it is now. http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Image:Ford_meets_with_Rumsfeld_and_Cheney%2C_April_28%2C_1975.jpg

The transplanted dark hair from the back, stayed dark ten full years after being put up front, surrounded by greying hair…completely unchanged by it. Its been shown that it will stay dark (other observations) until the hair in the back begins to change color also…


#4

Right now the HT community is collectively ignoring donor-thinning and hoping it will just go away.