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How do we know plucked hairs are growing back @ donor site?


#1

It occurred to me that with all the excitement about plucked hairs bathed in ACell growing (and perhaps cycling) at their new recipient sites, has it been confirmed that these hairs are always growing back at the donor site?

What if it’s a zero-sum game and the more of the follicle you pluck out, the more of a tendency there is for it to grow at the new site, but the less of a tendency it will have to grow back at the donor site.

To me, the only way to confirm this is to cordon off a defined perimeter in the donor area, say by shaving down a 3 cm diameter circle, then letting the hairs grow long enough to pluck, and plucking out all the hairs in that circle (or, say, all the hairs in the center of the circle) and see how many actually grow back.

I think we can’t just assume plucked hairs ALWAYS grow back. In general, yes they do, but just how reliably? Could it depend on the plucking technique? Maybe the best plucking technique to generate a new hair elsewhere, is also the one that can destroy or eliminate the follicle at the donor site.


#2

I have some hairs in my nose iam plucking since so many years and they still come back, in these days they even come faster i dont know why.

Plucked hair will grew back because the main part of the follicle is still INTACT in its born position.

And to be honest i doubt that anybody would make effort to plck hairs when they didnt grew back in the donor site, this would be worthles as a FUT these days.

Someone her posted a picture about how a graft looks like and well, even if you would perform a FUE there is still a chance that a transected hair will grow back.

You should put your effort in research and not in posting Armageddon Worst Case Scenarios.


#3

» It occurred to me that with all the excitement about plucked hairs bathed
» in ACell growing (and perhaps cycling) at their new recipient sites, has it
» been confirmed that these hairs are always growing back at the donor site?
»
» What if it’s a zero-sum game and the more of the follicle you pluck out,
» the more of a tendency there is for it to grow at the new site, but the
» less of a tendency it will have to grow back at the donor site.
»
» To me, the only way to confirm this is to cordon off a defined perimeter
» in the donor area, say by shaving down a 3 cm diameter circle, then letting
» the hairs grow long enough to pluck, and plucking out all the hairs in that
» circle (or, say, all the hairs in the center of the circle) and see how
» many actually grow back.
»
» I think we can’t just assume plucked hairs ALWAYS grow back. In general,
» yes they do, but just how reliably? Could it depend on the plucking
» technique? Maybe the best plucking technique to generate a new hair
» elsewhere, is also the one that can destroy or eliminate the follicle at
» the donor site.

Why does it feel like you come up with some random clinical theory every two days?

Let. The doctors. With medical degrees. Handle it.


#4

Also, I’d like to echo Willy’s sentiment on a previous thread…

Why are you even worried about ACell? I mean, didn’t the scientists behind the real cure already contact you personally?


#5

» Also, I’d like to echo Willy’s sentiment on a previous thread…
»
» Why are you even worried about ACell? I mean, didn’t the scientists behind
» the real cure already contact you personally?

Yea, roger_that, Shooter is absolutely right:

Didn’t reputable scientists behind ACell like …

  • Dr. Stephen Badylak
  • Dr. Anthony Atala
  • Dr. Steven Wolf

… already contact you personally?

Just in case you’ve no idea WHO these guys are, it would be a pleasure for me to tell you some FACTS about them …


#6

What does my question have to do directly with ACell? I asked if plucking hairs could damage the follicle in some cases leading to destruction of some hair follicles.

If that is the case, it doesn’t have anytjing to do with ACell one way or the other, unless ACell is being used at the plucking site, as well.

» » Also, I’d like to echo Willy’s sentiment on a previous thread…
» »
» » Why are you even worried about ACell? I mean,
» didn’t the scientists behind
» » the real cure already contact you personally?
»
» Yea, roger_that, Shooter is absolutely right:
»
» http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=3njZkP_3N48
»
» Didn’t reputable scientists behind ACell like …
»
» - Dr. Stephen Badylak
» - Dr. Anthony Atala
» - Dr. Steven Wolf
»
» … already contact you personally?
»
» Just in case you’ve no idea WHO these guys are, it would be a pleasure for
» me to tell you some FACTS about them …


#7

A hair follicle dying from being plucked once or even 2-3 times is highly unlikely.

If it really worked like that women would only have to wax their legs 2-3 times in their lifetime to get permanent hair removal on their legs (and don’t give me that leg hair or body hair is totally different from scalp hair). And no one would go get laser hair removal if this was the case because you could just pluck hair away.

Obviously we know women pluck and wax (same diff) hairs dozens of times, sometimes for a life time and they in many cases don’t ever go away.

If you’re so curious though, really try it on yourself. Pick a spot a pluck it and see if it regrows (which it almost certainly will) and then pluck it again.


#8

» If you’re so curious though, really try it on yourself. Pick a spot a
» pluck it and see if it regrows (which it almost certainly will) and then
» pluck it again.

roger_that, somebody mentioned you’re Dr. Rassman’s Quato:
http://www.hairsite.com/hair-loss/board_entry-id-63189.html#p63213

So yeah, why don’t you take Dr. Rassman’s advise??


#9

Bow down before me!!! :stuck_out_tongue:


#10

» It occurred to me that with all the excitement about plucked hairs bathed
» in ACell growing (and perhaps cycling) at their new recipient sites, has it
» been confirmed that these hairs are always growing back at the donor site?
»
» What if it’s a zero-sum game and the more of the follicle you pluck out,
» the more of a tendency there is for it to grow at the new site, but the
» less of a tendency it will have to grow back at the donor site.
»
» To me, the only way to confirm this is to cordon off a defined perimeter
» in the donor area, say by shaving down a 3 cm diameter circle, then letting
» the hairs grow long enough to pluck, and plucking out all the hairs in that
» circle (or, say, all the hairs in the center of the circle) and see how
» many actually grow back.
»
» I think we can’t just assume plucked hairs ALWAYS grow back. In general,
» yes they do, but just how reliably? Could it depend on the plucking
» technique? Maybe the best plucking technique to generate a new hair
» elsewhere, is also the one that can destroy or eliminate the follicle at
» the donor site.

REMEMBER–you’ll also have to determine the number of follicles that were in the dormant stage at the time of the plucking, and subtract the hair those dormant follicles will grow, from the number of hairs growing from the follicles you plucked.


#11

» It occurred to me that with all the excitement about plucked hairs bathed
» in ACell growing (and perhaps cycling) at their new recipient sites, has it
» been confirmed that these hairs are always growing back at the donor site?
»
» What if it’s a zero-sum game and the more of the follicle you pluck out,
» the more of a tendency there is for it to grow at the new site, but the
» less of a tendency it will have to grow back at the donor site.
»
» To me, the only way to confirm this is to cordon off a defined perimeter
» in the donor area, say by shaving down a 3 cm diameter circle, then letting
» the hairs grow long enough to pluck, and plucking out all the hairs in that
» circle (or, say, all the hairs in the center of the circle) and see how
» many actually grow back.
»
» I think we can’t just assume plucked hairs ALWAYS grow back. In general,
» yes they do, but just how reliably? Could it depend on the plucking
» technique? Maybe the best plucking technique to generate a new hair
» elsewhere, is also the one that can destroy or eliminate the follicle at
» the donor site.

As long ago as the early 1960s, I remember hearing that plucked hair will regrow. I also heard back then, that the more you shave your beard, the stronger it will grow–and we know what happened to that theory.

And I supposed that old statement about plucked hair regrowing, has been made so often since then (and probably long before then), that everyone–doctors and scientists included–accept it as gospel, not thinking to take a look at the studies that were done to prove plucked hair regrows–or even if there ever were such studies.

More likely this rule about plucked hair regrowing was the result of anecdotal observations, and not the result of a controlled experiment.

And the anecdotal evidence that plucked hair regrows being so strong, it is pretty safe–for now–to assume that the donor follicles Cooley and Hitzig plucked hair from, did regrow.

BUT since we are now talking about plucking on a large scale with the ultimate purpose of giving someone more hair overall than they started with–as opposed to the plucking of unwanted hair–it is important that a controlled scientific experiment be done to demonstrate that not only will plucked hair regrow—

But that also if a follicle repeatedly has its hair plucked from it, it will continue to grow hair.

I have suspected there is a possibility hair follicles are genetically programmed to cycle a fixed number of times in a person’s life.

If so, each time a hair if plucked from a follicle, you might be shortening by 3 to 6 years, the length of time that follicle will continue to produce hair.

Even if my suspiciion of a genetically limited number of cycles is incorrect, there is still a chance that repeated plucking of hair from the same follicle may eventually result in scarring alopecia.

Until either case is tested scientifically, it seems best to be prudent by not plucking the same donor follicle more than once, by carefully documenting where the hair is harvested for each plucked hair transplant session.

And when conducting such a scientific experiment, one must remember to be careful not to confuse any regrowth seen in the plucked donor area, with the hair growing from follicles in that area that were in the dormant phase of the hair cycle at the time of the plucking.


#12

» A hair follicle dying from being plucked once or even 2-3 times is highly
» unlikely.

What if plucking 2-3 times, shortend the life of the follicle by as much as 18 years (or by three hair cycles)?

Then the follicle would continue to grow hair for now–but then might stop growing hair prematurely, several years and several cycles later.

And what if the follicle is plucked more than 2 or 3 times?

» If it really worked like that women would only have to wax their legs 2-3
» times in their lifetime to get permanent hair removal on their legs (and
» don’t give me that leg hair or body hair is totally different from scalp
» hair). And no one would go get laser hair removal if this was the case
» because you could just pluck hair away.
»
» Obviously we know women pluck and wax (same diff) hairs dozens of times,
» sometimes for a life time and they in many cases don’t ever go away.

Body hair can increase with age, except in the old, when it might decrease.

I know I had much more body hair at 50 years old, than I had at 20.

Therefore, it’s possible that as fast as a woman’s leg hair follicles are damaged by repeated plucking, new follicles are coming on line as she ages, so it might seem that the same old follicles are still growing hair after being repeatedly plucked.

Only way to know for sure is controlled experimentation with close observation

» If you’re so curious though, really try it on yourself. Pick a spot a
» pluck it and see if it regrows (which it almost certainly will) and then
» pluck it again.

You better be real sure you’re talking about the same follicle, and not confusing it with new hair from one or more other follicles in a state of natural dormancy right next to the follicle you’re plucking.

Sounds like you’d need a microscope or even a biopsy to really see what you’re doing.