Home | News | Find a Doctor | Ask a Question | Free

Hibiscus Extract


#1

Hibiscus Extract

In vivo and in vitro studies evaluated petrolatum ether extracts of the leaves and flowers of Hibiscus rosa-sinensis for its potential to stimulate hair growth. Topical preparations were applied to the backs of albino rats and to cell cultures of hair follicles from albino rat neonates. From the study it was determined that, compared to the flower, the leaf extract was a more potent hair promoter.


#2

» Hibiscus Extract
»
» In vivo and in vitro studies evaluated petrolatum ether extracts of the
» leaves and flowers of Hibiscus rosa-sinensis for its potential to stimulate
» hair growth. Topical preparations were applied to the backs of albino rats
» and to cell cultures of hair follicles from albino rat neonates. From the
» study it was determined that, compared to the flower, the leaf extract was
» a more potent hair promoter.

For alot of people who scan these forums, what they also want besides supplements is advice on diet. Thus Diet & Supps , Stress reduction and Exercise are very useful to help with overall health.

No one on this board seems to have posted any links to the links between hairloss and heart disease. (I have mentioned it in the past)
Hairsite admin - Such links would be useful for newbies when trying to review their own diet.

Regards
Pete


#3

Early onset of androgenetic alopecia associated with early severe coronary heart disease: a population-based, case-control study.

J Cardiovasc Risk. 2001 Jun;8(3):147-51

CONTEXT:
The relationship of ischaemic heart disease (IHD) with androgenic alopecia (AGA) has been demonstrated, but no differentiation between early and late onsets of alopecia with regard to the risk and severity of IHD has been made.

OBJECTIVE:
To test if the early onset of alopecia is a risk factor for early severe, coronary artery disease (CAD) requiring surgery and to test if the early onset of AGA differs in this respect from the late onset of AGA. DESIGN: Population-based case-control study.

SETTING AND PARTICIPANTS:
All the 85 male persons living on 31 December 1999 in a Finnish town with total population of 7200, who had had a coronary revascularization procedure between March 1987 and January 1999, were drawn from the discharge register. For each case, an individually selected age-matched control person living in the same town was drawn from the official census register.

MAIN OUTCOME MEASURE:
Alopecia defined as grade 3 vertex or more on the alopecia classification scale of Hamilton, modified by Norwood South Med J, 68:1359-1365, 1975. RESULTS: The unadjusted odds ratio (OR) for coronary revascularization under the age of 60 years was 3.57 (95% confidence interval (CI) 1.19-10.72) in men with an early onset of AGA compared with men with normal hair status or late AGA. After multivariate adjustment for the traditional CAD risk factors, the corresponding OR was 3.18 (95% CI, 1.01-10.03). The unadjusted OR for the coronary revascularization procedure at any age was 2.14 (95% CI, 1.08-4.23) in the subgroup of the men with early AGA compared to those with late AGA or normal hair status. After adjustment for traditional risk factors this OR was 1.84, being nearly significant (95% CI, 0.90-3.77).

CONCLUSION:
Our results support the hypothesis that the early onset of AGA is a risk factor for an early onset of severe coronary heart disease.


#4

Baldness and coronary artery disease: the dermatologic point of view of a controversial issue.

Arch Dermatol. 2001 Jul;137(7):943-7

OBJECTIVE:
Several articles, most of them written by nondermatologists, have stressed that bald men have a higher risk for coronary artery disease than men who are not bald. This study was performed to evaluate the validity of such conclusions from a dermatologic point of view.

DESIGN:
A review of the 24 articles in literature from 1954 to 1999 as provided by MEDLINE and a previous review.

RESULTS:
Five articles contained simple comments; 1 was a review of the previous literature; and 3 dealt only with the lipid profile. The remaining 15 articles dealt with coronary artery disease and baldness, and 9 of these concluded that there is a relationship between the 2 conditions, especially in younger subjects with severe early-onset androgenetic alopecia.

CONCLUSIONS:
Baldness did not coincide with androgenetic alopecia in some of the articles examined, which makes it difficult to settle the issue. Subjects who develop baldness before their 30s may have a higher risk for coronary artery disease than other men, and they may be individuals with early-onset androgenetic alopecia who also present with particularly elevated dihydrotestosterone-testosterone ratios. The baldness theory should be included as a secondary hypothesis in large epidemiological studies of coronary artery disease. Such studies should include dermatologic expertise for accurate, cost-effective evaluation of baldness.


#5

» Baldness and coronary artery disease: the dermatologic point of view of
» a controversial issue.

»
» Arch Dermatol. 2001 Jul;137(7):943-7
»
» OBJECTIVE:
» Several articles, most of them written by nondermatologists, have stressed
» that bald men have a higher risk for coronary artery disease than men who
» are not bald. This study was performed to evaluate the validity of such
» conclusions from a dermatologic point of view.
»
» DESIGN:
» A review of the 24 articles in literature from 1954 to 1999 as provided by
» MEDLINE and a previous review.
»
» RESULTS:
» Five articles contained simple comments; 1 was a review of the previous
» literature; and 3 dealt only with the lipid profile. The remaining 15
» articles dealt with coronary artery disease and baldness, and 9 of these
» concluded that there is a relationship between the 2 conditions, especially
» in younger subjects with severe early-onset androgenetic alopecia.
»
»
» CONCLUSIONS:
» Baldness did not coincide with androgenetic alopecia in some of the
» articles examined, which makes it difficult to settle the issue. Subjects
» who develop baldness before their 30s may have a higher risk for coronary
» artery disease than other men, and they may be individuals with early-onset
» androgenetic alopecia who also present with particularly elevated
» dihydrotestosterone-testosterone ratios. The baldness theory should be
» included as a secondary hypothesis in large epidemiological studies of
» coronary artery disease. Such studies should include dermatologic expertise
» for accurate, cost-effective evaluation of baldness.

What Ive been working on recently is my own stress response. This seems to be the biggest factor in most chronic health issues. When your body is stressed albeit unknowingly, no amount of supplements or dietary intervention will help.

Regards
Pete


#6

According to my personal experience, you are absolutely wrong about this. Your response to stress is completely affected by diet and exercise, as well as your mind. Before I went on a raw food diet which is so much more alkaline than my old diet, I used to feel like I was sweating acid. Yes, that itching feeling all over my skin from perspiration that felt acidic was my reaction to stress. I remember my scalp itching while I stessed about school exams and watching my hair fall out all over my desk. But an alkaline diet is like taking a cool shower on a hot day. The change doesn’t come over night but if you give it time you will see and feel the difference. I just wish I knew about this before I lost half the hair on my head. I don’t think dietary changes will grow your hair back that you’ve lost for many years but I do think that an extreme change can stop anyone’s hairloss. It’s a fact that a raw food diet, done properly, can reverse many so called incurable diseases like diabetes and even cancer.

In case you’re wondering, the staple of my diet is throwing raw organic fruits and vegetables into a blender with some water and chugging it down like baby food. My favorite fruits are berries and my favorite vegetables are green leafy vegies like kale, collard greens and cabbage. I do eat raw milk cheese for protein (never pasteurized) but I hardly ever eat meat.

It’s a fact that many B vitamins affect our nervous system and our response to stress. There’s no better source of vitamins than organic raw fruits and vegetables, not to mention all of the minerals, enzymes, and unknowns they contain. I also add a lot of superfoods like raw chocolate (highest known food in anti-oxidants), sundried goji berries, flax seed sprouts, spirulina algae, chlorella algae, wheat grass juice, barley grass juice and occasionally some different herbs like fo-ti. I also make my own kombucha tea and I add fresh juiced ginger root and tumeric root which also makes it taste great.

I guess you could say I’ll most likely die in an accident. :wink:

» What Ive been working on recently is my own stress response. This seems to
» be the biggest factor in most chronic health issues. When your body is
» stressed albeit unknowingly, no amount of supplements or dietary
» intervention will help.
»
»
»
»
» Regards
» Pete


#7

» According to my personal experience, you are absolutely wrong about this.
» Your response to stress is completely affected by diet and exercise, as
» well as your mind. Before I went on a raw food diet which is so much more
» alkaline than my old diet, I used to feel like I was sweating acid. Yes,
» that itching feeling all over my skin from perspiration that felt acidic
» was my reaction to stress. I remember my scalp itching while I stessed
» about school exams and watching my hair fall out all over my desk. But an
» alkaline diet is like taking a cool shower on a hot day. The change
» doesn’t come over night but if you give it time you will see and feel the
» difference. I just wish I knew about this before I lost half the hair on
» my head. I don’t think dietary changes will grow your hair back that
» you’ve lost for many years but I do think that an extreme change can stop
» anyone’s hairloss. It’s a fact that a raw food diet, done properly, can
» reverse many so called incurable diseases like diabetes and even cancer.
»
» In case you’re wondering, the staple of my diet is throwing raw organic
» fruits and vegetables into a blender with some water and chugging it down
» like baby food. My favorite fruits are berries and my favorite vegetables
» are green leafy vegies like kale, collard greens and cabbage. I do eat raw
» milk cheese for protein (never pasteurized) but I hardly ever eat meat.
»
» It’s a fact that many B vitamins affect our nervous system and our
» response to stress. There’s no better source of vitamins than organic raw
» fruits and vegetables, not to mention all of the minerals, enzymes, and
» unknowns they contain. I also add a lot of superfoods like raw chocolate
» (highest known food in anti-oxidants), sundried goji berries, flax seed
» sprouts, spirulina algae, chlorella algae, wheat grass juice, barley grass
» juice and occasionally some different herbs like fo-ti. I also make my own
» kombucha tea and I add fresh juiced ginger root and tumeric root which also
» makes it taste great.
»
» I guess you could say I’ll most likely die in an accident. :wink:
»
»
» » What Ive been working on recently is my own stress response. This seems
» to
» » be the biggest factor in most chronic health issues. When your body is
» » stressed albeit unknowingly, no amount of supplements or dietary
» » intervention will help.
» »
» »
» »
» »
» » Regards
» » Pete

Im glad youve improved your diet and it has helped your stress levels - it should.

Regards
Pete


#8

» According to my personal experience, you are absolutely wrong about this.
» Your response to stress is completely affected by diet and exercise, as
» well as your mind. Before I went on a raw food diet which is so much more
» alkaline than my old diet, I used to feel like I was sweating acid. Yes,
» that itching feeling all over my skin from perspiration that felt acidic
» was my reaction to stress. I remember my scalp itching while I stessed
» about school exams and watching my hair fall out all over my desk. But an
» alkaline diet is like taking a cool shower on a hot day. The change
» doesn’t come over night but if you give it time you will see and feel the
» difference. I just wish I knew about this before I lost half the hair on
» my head. I don’t think dietary changes will grow your hair back that
» you’ve lost for many years but I do think that an extreme change can stop
» anyone’s hairloss. It’s a fact that a raw food diet, done properly, can
» reverse many so called incurable diseases like diabetes and even cancer.
»
» In case you’re wondering, the staple of my diet is throwing raw organic
» fruits and vegetables into a blender with some water and chugging it down
» like baby food. My favorite fruits are berries and my favorite vegetables
» are green leafy vegies like kale, collard greens and cabbage. I do eat raw
» milk cheese for protein (never pasteurized) but I hardly ever eat meat.
»
» It’s a fact that many B vitamins affect our nervous system and our
» response to stress. There’s no better source of vitamins than organic raw
» fruits and vegetables, not to mention all of the minerals, enzymes, and
» unknowns they contain. I also add a lot of superfoods like raw chocolate
» (highest known food in anti-oxidants), sundried goji berries, flax seed
» sprouts, spirulina algae, chlorella algae, wheat grass juice, barley grass
» juice and occasionally some different herbs like fo-ti. I also make my own
» kombucha tea and I add fresh juiced ginger root and tumeric root which also
» makes it taste great.
»
» I guess you could say I’ll most likely die in an accident. :wink:
»
»
» » What Ive been working on recently is my own stress response. This seems
» to
» » be the biggest factor in most chronic health issues. When your body is
» » stressed albeit unknowingly, no amount of supplements or dietary
» » intervention will help.
» »
» »
» »
» »
» » Regards
» » Pete

dietary changes and vitamins and minerals have a large effect on hair loss and growth and overall hair health . this is more true as far as helping hair loss in the early stages of MPB

however, you can have a perfect diet, and if you have a large DHT accumulation in your follicles and are doing nothing to reduce DHT , diet and vitamins become ineffective at stopping fallout

In 1999 i had been on only diet and vitamins and minerals for about 15 years, and had successfully stopped the speed of my thinning hair line although it was still thinning i had it under control. But at that time in 1999 i started losing 300 hairs a day and no change in diet or increase in my super hair vitamins would stop it. I for the first time tried adding dht blockers such as saw palmetto, and within 3 wks my fallout went down to about 20 hairs per day, quite a reduction/ I think the natural dht blockers in my case interfere with the body attacking the hair follicles with some type of auto immune defense.

so yes you are right diet and vits and minerals are extremely important but they must also be combined with DHT blockers, at least in my case


#9

Yes, there’s definitely some lag time for your body to detoxify and meanwhile you’ll continue to lose hair. But I’m talking about a “perfect” diet, not just taking supplements, which should have your hormones balanced and your body cleansed of toxic accumulations including DHT in just a few months. I think after a few months, if you can maintain this perfect diet, there’s really no need for DHT blockers.

I have my own theory on DHT and I’ll tell you what I think just for fun - because without scientific proof it’s kind of meaningless speculation. I believe DHT is like bad cholesterol. Bad cholesterol is oxidized cholesterol and I believe it’s the result of free radical damage caused by a bad diet. Cholesterol itself is not bad and, in fact, is a necessary hormone which is produced by animals. The same way that testosterone is a necessary hormone that our bodies produce. It doesn’t surprise me that a bad diet will interfere with these essential hormones and create toxic byproducts.

Humans are the only animals who eat cooked food and we’ve only just relatively begun to eat foods like grains and beans because about 10,000 years ago we learned to cook food. And grains which has only recently been added to our diet have become our staple no less!

A super healthy raw food diet can “cure” many diseases so it only makes sense that this includes hairloss. However, I don’t think it can grow hair from a dead follicle just like I don’t think it will turn scar tissue back into skin. That would be a job for something like stem cells which seems to be our best hope for areas that are shiny bald.

» dietary changes and vitamins and minerals have a large effect on hair loss
» and growth and overall hair health . this is more true as far as helping
» hair loss in the early stages of MPB
»
» however, you can have a perfect diet, and if you have a large DHT
» accumulation in your follicles and are doing nothing to reduce DHT , diet
» and vitamins become ineffective at stopping fallout
»
» In 1999 i had been on only diet and vitamins and minerals for about 15
» years, and had successfully stopped the speed of my thinning hair line
» although it was still thinning i had it under control. But at that time in
» 1999 i started losing 300 hairs a day and no change in diet or increase in
» my super hair vitamins would stop it. I for the first time tried adding dht
» blockers such as saw palmetto, and within 3 wks my fallout went down to
» about 20 hairs per day, quite a reduction/ I think the natural dht blockers
» in my case interfere with the body attacking the hair follicles with some
» type of auto immune defense.
»
» so yes you are right diet and vits and minerals are extremely important
» but they must also be combined with DHT blockers, at least in my case


#10

Cueball, yours is an intelligent response, addressing the cause, as opposed to just treating the symptoms (as a DHT-blocking regimen does, and even that is not for very long, and not without potential side effects).


#11

» Yes, there’s definitely some lag time for your body to detoxify and
» meanwhile you’ll continue to lose hair. But I’m talking about a “perfect”
» diet, not just taking supplements, which should have your hormones balanced
» and your body cleansed of toxic accumulations including DHT in just a few
» months. I think after a few months, if you can maintain this perfect diet,
» there’s really no need for DHT blockers.
»
» I have my own theory on DHT and I’ll tell you what I think just for fun -
» because without scientific proof it’s kind of meaningless speculation. I
» believe DHT is like bad cholesterol. Bad cholesterol is oxidized
» cholesterol and I believe it’s the result of free radical damage caused by
» a bad diet. Cholesterol itself is not bad and, in fact, is a necessary
» hormone which is produced by animals. The same way that testosterone is a
» necessary hormone that our bodies produce. It doesn’t surprise me that a
» bad diet will interfere with these essential hormones and create toxic
» byproducts.
»
» Humans are the only animals who eat cooked food and we’ve only just
» relatively begun to eat foods like grains and beans because about 10,000
» years ago we learned to cook food. And grains which has only recently been
» added to our diet have become our staple no less!
»
» A super healthy raw food diet can “cure” many diseases so it only makes
» sense that this includes hairloss. However, I don’t think it can grow hair
» from a dead follicle just like I don’t think it will turn scar tissue back
» into skin. That would be a job for something like stem cells which seems
» to be our best hope for areas that are shiny bald.
»
»
» » dietary changes and vitamins and minerals have a large effect on hair
» loss
» » and growth and overall hair health . this is more true as far as
» helping
» » hair loss in the early stages of MPB
» »
» » however, you can have a perfect diet, and if you have a large DHT
» » accumulation in your follicles and are doing nothing to reduce DHT ,
» diet
» » and vitamins become ineffective at stopping fallout
» »
» » In 1999 i had been on only diet and vitamins and minerals for about 15
» » years, and had successfully stopped the speed of my thinning hair line
» » although it was still thinning i had it under control. But at that time
» in
» » 1999 i started losing 300 hairs a day and no change in diet or increase
» in
» » my super hair vitamins would stop it. I for the first time tried adding
» dht
» » blockers such as saw palmetto, and within 3 wks my fallout went down to
» » about 20 hairs per day, quite a reduction/ I think the natural dht
» blockers
» » in my case interfere with the body attacking the hair follicles with
» some
» » type of auto immune defense.
» »
» » so yes you are right diet and vits and minerals are extremely important
» » but they must also be combined with DHT blockers, at least in my case

it is an interesting theory , i just wish most of us had the discipline to test it, and being in a fast pasted go go go world, how many have time to cook all their own meals and have the discipline to never eat out at a restaurant

when i was in colorado many years ago and not on my dht blockers i tried the natural diet thing and tried cooking all my own food, +I almost starved to death, i was never so hungry, perhaps i am not up on all the proper foods or te+chniques.


#12

Actually I save time and money over the way I used to eat, which was always eating out at healthy restaurants. I usually found Asian restaurants to be healthiest. However, now I prepare food fairly quickly - just throw it in a blender (remember I don’t cook anything, it’s all raw). As long as I keep my refrigerator stocked with the right fruits and vegies I’m ready for a meal in less time than it took me to wait at the restaurant after I ordered. And I’m actually saving money now even though I eat by the blender fulls - you can imagine how much of my home made baby food it takes to fill me up. It does take discipline though. Most meals don’t taste great but I don’t think they taste bad either. In fact, some things I make are delicious like fresh pesto on fresh sliced tomatoes. Or avocado with raw honey and raw chocolate powder - tastes like chocolate pudding (raw chocolate is the highest known food in anti-oxidants). Just google “raw food recipe” or “green smoothie recipe” and you’ll find endless things to make.

» it is an interesting theory , i just wish most of us had the discipline to
» test it, and being in a fast pasted go go go world, how many have time to
» cook all their own meals and have the discipline to never eat out at a
» restaurant
»
» when i was in colorado many years ago and not on my dht blockers i tried
» the natural diet thing and tried cooking all my own food, +I almost starved
» to death, i was never so hungry, perhaps i am not up on all the proper
» foods or te+chniques.


#13

Cue, you are absolutely right. And your hair will be the better for it!

Anyone who thinks that they can eat whatever they want, pop in couple of Maxi Hair pills, and think “everything will be ok” is a fool, plain and simple.


#14

» Cue, you are absolutely right. And your hair will be the better for it!
»
» Anyone who thinks that they can eat whatever they want, pop in
» couple of Maxi Hair pills, and think “everything will be ok” is a fool,
» plain and simple.

never said …its the same as a great diet plus supplements

but its better than a not great diet and no supplements

then again Mister see through hair, what do you know :hungry:

by the way it has been proven the body is incapable of distinguishing where supplements come from, it just wants them, the nutrients that is. It does not care if the vitamin C comes from an orange , or a supplement, it just wants and needs it

besides where do you think supplements use as the source of their nutrients? you think they manufacture them in a lab? You think kelp supplements are not made from, for example…seaweed?

where do you think saw palmetto supplements come from, DUH saw palmetto plant

nettles root supplements? DUH, nettles roots

whats the difference