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Follica pre treatment = Intercytex pre treatment!


#1

» Success rates were as high as 80 per cent when a powerful abrasive
» technique was used to stimulate the scalp ahead of the injections, an
» Italian conference heard

“Abrasive technique” That is for me very interesting news !


#2

I remember reading something about DEEP wounding. It is in one of the first follica articles. The wounds are not minor, they need to be pretty deep.


#3

» I remember reading something about DEEP wounding. It is in one of the first
» follica articles. The wounds are not minor, they need to be pretty deep.

Incorrect

Zohar says Follica has further developed this work and filed additional patents to protect the technology. What’s so beautiful about the approach, she says, is that translating it into a treatment for humans involves only devices and drugs that are already on the market. A doctor would first use a microdermabrasion tool, say, or a laser to remove the top layers of the skin—as is already commonly done in a number of dermatologic and cosmetic procedures—knocking some cells back into a primitive state. The doctor can then use this newly created therapeutic window to inject drugs that push the cells to develop along one pathway or another and grow hair or skin. Zohar won’t reveal what drugs Follica is using, except to say that they are small molecule drugs normally taken orally for purposes with no relation to hair growth.”


#4

Wow …great stuff


#5

» Wow …great stuff

Exciting, no fda approval, no hair transplant and very likely to be low cost if everything goes as expected.


#6

» » Success rates were as high as 80 per cent when a powerful
» abrasive
» » technique was used to stimulate the scalp ahead of the injections, an
» » Italian conference heard

did Intercytex say that? where? links please!


#7

» » » Success rates were as high as 80 per cent when a powerful
» » abrasive
» » » technique was used to stimulate the scalp ahead of the injections, an
» » » Italian conference heard
»

I think it is here:

The new technique uses the person’s own hair cells to stimulate growth

And although the treatment could end up more expensive than conventional hair transplants --which cost between £2,500 and £10,000 - it is said to be quicker and less painful.

The remedy centres on dermal papilla cells, which are found at the bottom of the hair follicle. They trigger the growth of new hair - and it is their gradual death which causes baldness.

Intercytex has shown it is possible to remove these cells from the side or back of the head, clone them in the laboratory and inject them back into the scalp - where they kick-start hair growth.

Hollywood actor Bruce Willis has embraced baldness as part of his image. But he may one day like to regrow his hair using the new technique
Preliminary results from a small trial showed the technique was successful in seven of the 11 men treated so far.

Success rates were as high as 80 per cent when a powerful abrasive technique was used to stimulate-the scalp ahead of the injections.

Dr Paul Kemp of Intercytex said: 'It will revolutionise hair care, I think. People will use this when they are starting to go bald - they’ll come and see us, we’ll take a few dermal papilla cells, grow them up in the lab, freeze most of them and inject some.

‘They can keep coming back as the balding process continues. I’m convinced it will work.’

A typical man will need around 1,000 injections, with each jab penetrating 3mm into the skin.

In contrast, conventional hair transplants typically require two eight-hour sessions under local anaesthetic.

Hair loss affects an estimated 7.4million British men. There is no cure but several tablets and lotions can help regrowth. Shampoos can help disguise the problem by making hair look thicker.

Experts - in both science and fashion - do not recommend a comb-over to disguise any bald patches. Instead, men are advised to go for a close crop.

<<<<<<


#8

» » Success rates were as high as 80 per cent when a powerful
» abrasive
» » technique was used to stimulate the scalp ahead of the injections, an
» » Italian conference heard
»
» “Abrasive technique” That is for me very interesting news !

okay, so it seems that dermabrasion seems the key. Probably, dermabrasion + Minox will work better than TRC+dermabrasion.


#9

» And although the treatment could end up more expensive than conventional
» hair transplants --which cost between £2,500 and £10,000 - it
» is said to be quicker and less painful.

Holy cow, they already predict that this is going to be more expensive than hair transplant?


#10

» » And although the treatment could end up more expensive than conventional
» » hair transplants --which cost between £2,500 and £10,000 -
» it
» » is said to be quicker and less painful.
»
» Holy cow, they already predict that this is going to be more expensive
» than hair transplant?

At least Follica won’t be expensive and will probably be here sooner…


#11

» » » And although the treatment could end up more expensive than
» conventional
» » » hair transplants --which cost between £2,500 and £10,000
» -
» » it
» » » is said to be quicker and less painful.
» »
» » Holy cow, they already predict that this is going to be more expensive
» » than hair transplant?
»
»
» At least Follica won’t be expensive and will probably be here sooner…

yes, after this, it seems that Follica is the way to go. We will see.
Kemp says again that TRC will be for people who is starting to lose hair.


#12

» » » » And although the treatment could end up more expensive than
» » conventional
» » » » hair transplants --which cost between £2,500 and
» £10,000
» » -
» » » it
» » » » is said to be quicker and less painful.
» » »
» » » Holy cow, they already predict that this is going to be more
» expensive
» » » than hair transplant?
» »
» »
» » At least Follica won’t be expensive and will probably be here sooner…
»
» yes, after this, it seems that Follica is the way to go. We will see.
» Kemp says again that TRC will be for people who is starting to lose hair.

Yeah it will be out of the question for me if TRC is going to be as expensive as hair transplant. I am now starting to warm up to the idea of Follica being my next hope.


#13

http://www.sciencefriday.com/news/051807/news0518071.html

The researchers discovered that when a mouse was wounded deeply enough (a five millimeter scar needed to form), new hair follicles emerged at the middle of the wound and new hair sprouted. “We saw all these stages that looked like hair follicle development in the embryo,” Cotsarelis says.


#14

» http://www.sciencefriday.com/news/051807/news0518071.html
»
» The researchers discovered that when a mouse was wounded deeply enough (a
» five millimeter scar needed to form), new hair follicles emerged at the
» middle of the wound and new hair sprouted. “We saw all these stages that
» looked like hair follicle development in the embryo,” Cotsarelis says.

I made the same mistake before you did debris (cal called me out on it).
The 5mm was in reference to width not depth.

.


#15

aha ok.


#16

» aha ok.

It appears that the technique is quite straight forward, any doctor or dermatologist can do it, which is good news, more competition = better quality and better pricing.


#17

» » aha ok.
»
» It appears that the technique is quite straight forward, any doctor or
» dermatologist can do it, which is good news, more competition = better
» quality and better pricing.

That’s what I like about the concept as well - quick market penetration.

Most towns have a dermatologist, or a doctor with access to these tools. Moreso, it’s plausible the Follica concoction could be manufactured/ distributed in a similar fashion to other cosmetic products (like botox). That could mean any doctor/ dermatologist could order the kit and perform the procedure on the patient themselves.

Even if ICX became available today, most of us wouldn’t have access to the technology. Forget about the price for a moment, and consider that their cell cultivation technology can only batch process a limited amount of clients. They would, literally, have to VASTLY expand their own facilities, or franchise the cultivation technology to chains across the globe. Even if bosley took the reigns of commercializing the tech - there are only so many bosely chains around, and the process involves 2 trips (one trip for them to harvest some cells, the other to implant them back into the scalp)

but enough speculation on my part; let’s hope Follica works first

.


#18

TRC wasn’t very good for the first 5 subjects, Intercytex knew this. When they heard about wounding which was found by Costarelis, they tried it with TRC.

Remember, the first patients ever of phase 2 didn’t get abrasion. I’m sure if you check the timeline you’ll see that their pre scalp stimulis happended just after the discovery of Costarelis… :smiley:


#19

» TRC wasn’t very good for the first 5 subjects, Intercytex knew this. When
» they heard about wounding which was found by Costarelis, they tried it with
» TRC.
»
» Remember, the first patients ever of phase 2 didn’t get abrasion. I’m sure
» if you check the timeline you’ll see that their pre scalp stimulis
» happended just after the discovery of Costarelis… :smiley:

But who knows, maybe it is as you say…


#20

» » » And although the treatment could end up more expensive than
» conventional
» » » hair transplants --which cost between £2,500 and £10,000
» -
» » it
» » » is said to be quicker and less painful.
» »
» » Holy cow, they already predict that this is going to be more expensive
» » than hair transplant?
»
»
» At least Follica won’t be expensive and will probably be here sooner…

Who knows if Follica will work, but if it does, it will certainly be less expensive; the patent consists of several common prescriptions briefly administered and a relatively inexpensive dermabrasion.