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Embryonic stem cells a plenty


#1

Study: Donated embryos could result in more than 2,000 new embryonic stem cell lines
Up to 60 percent of fertility clinic patients willing to donate remaining embryos to stem cell research

Baltimore – In a survey of more than one thousand infertility patients with frozen embryos, 60 percent of patients report that they are likely to donate their embryos to stem cell research, a level of donation that could result in roughly 2000 to 3000 new embryonic stem cell lines. Researchers from Duke University and Johns Hopkins University report the startling findings in the July 6, 2007 issue of Science.

In August of 2001, less than two dozen embryonic stem cell lines were made eligible for federal research funding. Most scientists now agree that the eligible lines have proven inadequate in number and unsafe for transnational research. Until recently, the best estimate of human embryos currently in storage that might be available for additional stem cell research was three percent. The 2003 study showed that donations would yield, at best, less than 300 new lines.

“Until now, the debate about federal funding for embryonic stem cell research has been dominated by lawmakers and advocates. But what about the preferences of infertility patients, who are ethically responsible for, and have legal authority over, these embryos"” asked Ruth Faden, director of the Johns Hopkins Berman Institute of Bioethics and one of the study’s two co-authors. “These patients face the often morally difficult task of deciding what to do with their remaining cryopreserved embryos. In the end, it is these people who determine whether embryos are available for adoption or for medical research.”

The 1,020 couples responding to the survey currently control the disposition of between 3,900 to 5,900 embryos. Nearly half of the respondents (49 percent) indicated they were somewhat or very likely to donate their frozen embryos to medical research. When asked about stem cell research in particular, this percentage increased to 60 percent.

“Our data suggest that the way many infertility patients resolve the very personal moral challenge of what to do with their embryos is consonant with the conclusions of the majority of Americans who support embryonic stem cell research,” said Anne Lyerly, M.D., Associate Professor of Obstetrics and Gynecology at Duke University and co-author of the study. “Many infertility patients see donating their remaining embryos for medical research as preferable to simply discarding them or even to donating to another infertile couple for adoption.”

Infertility patients in the Lyerly and Faden study said they were more likely to donate their embryos to scientists for stem cell research (60 percent) than to other couples for adoption (22 percent of respondents). Embryos are currently frozen in fertility clinics because more were created than could safely be returned to a woman’s uterus at the time of fertilization or in order to increase the chances of pregnancy from a single cycle of in-vitro fertilization.

About the Johns Hopkins Berman Institute of Bioethics:

One of the largest centers of its kind in the world, the Johns Hopkins Berman Institute of Bioethics is the home for collaborative scholarship and teaching on the ethics of clinical practice, public health, and biomedical science at Johns Hopkins University. Since 1995, the Institute has worked with governmental agencies, non-governmental organizations, and private sector organizations to address and resolve ethical issues. Institute faculty represent such disciplines as medicine, nursing, law, philosophy, public health, and the social sciences. Their works helps anticipate and inform debates on complex moral challenges; discerns ethically acceptable alternatives in medical, scientific, and public health policy; and helps to prepare the next generation of bioethicists. More information is available at www.bioethicsinstitute.org.


#2

» http://www.eurekalert.org/pub_releases/2007-06/jhu-sde061907.php
»
» Study: Donated embryos could result in more than 2,000 new embryonic stem
» cell lines
» Up to 60 percent of fertility clinic patients willing to donate remaining
» embryos to stem cell research

This is very encouraging news!! I for one am all for Embryonic Stem-Cell research!!

What exactly is a Stem-Cell Line though…?


#3

» » http://www.eurekalert.org/pub_releases/2007-06/jhu-sde061907.php
» »
» » Study: Donated embryos could result in more than 2,000 new embryonic
» stem
» » cell lines
» » Up to 60 percent of fertility clinic patients willing to donate
» remaining
» » embryos to stem cell research
»
» This is very encouraging news!! I for one am all for Embryonic Stem-Cell
» research!!
»
» What exactly is a Stem-Cell Line though…?

Have a read of this page,it tells you everything you need to know.

http://www.isscr.org/science/faq.htm#5


#4

Damon:

Thanks for posting this - very informative! Sorry for including you in my list on the other forum.

Jtelecom


#5

» This is very encouraging news!! I for one am all for Embryonic Stem-Cell
» research!!
»
» What exactly is a Stem-Cell Line though…?

A stem cell line is a population of stem cells that, if grown under the right conditions can be replicated for a very long time. Thus, one stem cell line can provide a lot of stem cells for research.

Typically, the stem cells are harvested from an egg about 5 days after it it fertilized. The fertilized egg at this stage is called a zygote and is microscopic (can’t be seen with the naked eye). At this point in time, the stem cells have not specialized and can form any tissue in the human body. Thus, if the proper growth signals were discovered, any part of your body could be reconstructed in a youthful state. Thus, stem cells are thought to perhaps be a fountain of youth and a future cure for many of the world’s diseases.

The current federal lines of stem cells available for research have been tainted and are unfit for many types of human research.

In vitro fertility clinics make way more zygotes than they need to make couple’s babies. Thus, the typical method of disposing of them is to wash them down the sink or throw them in the trash. Scientists would rather extract the stem cells from them before they are thrown away, but many anti-stem cell groups prefer to see them tossed out as opposed to being studied in an effort to heal the diseases of millions of suffering people.

There is a small percentage of informed anti-stem cell advocates who are also against in vitro fertilization. While that does seem inconsistent as far as their views on the right to life, I find I have less of a problem with this group than the group who endorses in vitro fertilization but would rather see the zygotes thrown away than used for science.


#6

» Damon:
»
» Thanks for posting this - very informative! Sorry for including you in my
» list on the other forum.
»
» Jtelecom

Where is our apology Jtel.


#7

» » This is very encouraging news!! I for one am all for Embryonic
» Stem-Cell
» » research!!
» »
» » What exactly is a Stem-Cell Line though…?
»
» A stem cell line is a population of stem cells that, if grown under the
» right conditions can be replicated for a very long time. Thus, one stem
» cell line can provide a lot of stem cells for research.
»
» Typically, the stem cells are harvested from an egg about 5 days after it
» it fertilized. The fertilized egg at this stage is called a zygote and is
» microscopic (can’t be seen with the naked eye). At this point in time, the
» stem cells have not specialized and can form any tissue in the human body.
» Thus, if the proper growth signals were discovered, any part of your body
» could be reconstructed in a youthful state. Thus, stem cells are thought
» to perhaps be a fountain of youth and a future cure for many of the
» world’s diseases.
»
» The current federal lines of stem cells available for research have been
» tainted and are unfit for many types of human research.
»
» In vitro fertility clinics make way more zygotes than they need to make
» couple’s babies. Thus, the typical method of disposing of them is to wash
» them down the sink or throw them in the trash. Scientists would rather
» extract the stem cells from them before they are thrown away, but many
» anti-stem cell groups prefer to see them tossed out as opposed to being
» studied in an effort to heal the diseases of millions of suffering
» people.
»
» There is a small percentage of informed anti-stem cell advocates who are
» also against in vitro fertilization. While that does seem inconsistent as
» far as their views on the right to life, I find I have less of a problem
» with this group than the group who endorses in vitro fertilization but
» would rather see the zygotes thrown away than used for science.

JB- First off, let me start by saying I am all in favor of government funded embryonic stem cell research. This is one area where the current administration and I part ways. However, it is not illegal for private funding to be engaged in this research. I don’t understand why more bio-tech companies aren’t more heavily involved in this. This would be one area where a lot of people, I believe, would be willing to invest if they were more informed on just how valuable these stem cells are. I know you are more knowledgeable than most of us in the bio-tech field, so if I’m wrong on this please correct my argument.