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Drs Farjo In The Media - See Links


#1

Drs Farjo In The Media

See link,then see links off this - interesting

http://www.farjo.net/page.asp?id=157


#2

Interesting for what?
Seems to be only publicity for the doctor farjo and icx… read at the top of the webpage… “Hair Transplant Surgery & Hair Loss Treatments
In The UK Since 1992”…


#3

Whats the point you`re trying to put across.
This is old news where Dr Farjo has been very clever in his marketing getting a lot of exposure doing a ht on a celebraty


#4

» Whats the point you`re trying to put across.
» This is old news where Dr Farjo has been very clever in his marketing
» getting a lot of exposure doing a ht on a celebraty

Yes… i think the same…

In march, ICX or Farjo have to release an important and substantial documented report, not like the last two, with insignificant pictures and a confusionary %%%%… If not, for my opinion, they lose credibility and scientific value…


#5

» Interesting for what?
» Seems to be only publicity for the doctor farjo and icx… read at the top
» of the webpage… “Hair Transplant Surgery & Hair Loss Treatments
» In The UK Since 1992”…

The links to the news articles are the interesting things - they state a couple of things I’d not seen before, or at least not as clearly.

The Times article:
“The procedure is designed to enable men to regrow their hair permanently with a series of cheap injections. Although it is unlikely to restore a full head of hair, the result, say the researchers, is more reliable than questionable lotions and looks more realistic than wigs or transplants.”
"The sample is taken to a laboratory where the dermal papilla cells, which produce the hair, are extracted and grown in flasks. After eight weeks the flasks should contain millions of cells.“
The most daunting part of the procedure is that a typical bare pate would need about 1,000 injections to establish enough new hair follicles. Each injection would penetrate just 3mm into the skin and would be done under local anaesthetic. Kemp’s procedure has been tested on seven volunteers, with the next round of clinical trials under way. The first volunteers received injections of hair follicle cells into small patches on their scalps. “The treated patch was about the size of a 5p piece and the number of hairs went up from 250 before the treatment to 316 after,” said Kemp.”
“Dr Bessam Farjo of the Farjo Medical Centre, a hair restoration clinic based in Manchester, where the trials are being carried out, said: “Current hair transplant techniques take a long time so they cost a lot of money. It is very early days but if this new procedure works it would be faster and cheaper.””

Summary of key points:

  • Bringing an NW7 to a NW1 is “unlikely” due to the number of injections required. It appears to say that an NW7 or thereabouts would need about 1000 injections. What about repeat visits?
  • More reliable than minoxidil, which is rather faint praise. “Looks more realistic” than wigs or transplants.
  • Takes at least two months between biopsy and the re-implantation of cells.
  • Phase I average hair count was 250 baseline to 316; this is where the average of 66 new hairs came from.
  • According to Dr Farjo if this works it will be faster and cheaper than a transplant.

That is how things stood in October 2006, some fifteen months ago now. Interviews with Kemp, Cotsarelis and someone from Aderans would be interesting right about now.


#6

» » Interesting for what?
» » Seems to be only publicity for the doctor farjo and icx… read at the
» top
» » of the webpage… “Hair Transplant Surgery & Hair Loss Treatments
» » In The UK Since 1992”…
»
» The links to the news articles are the interesting things - they state a
» couple of things I’d not seen before, or at least not as clearly.
»
» The Times article:
» “The procedure is designed to enable men to regrow their hair permanently
» with a series of cheap injections. Although it is unlikely to restore a
» full head of hair, the result, say the researchers, is more reliable than
» questionable lotions and looks more realistic than wigs or transplants.”
» “The sample is taken to a laboratory where the dermal papilla cells, which
» produce the hair, are extracted and grown in flasks. After eight weeks the
» flasks should contain millions of cells.”
» The most daunting part of the procedure is that a typical bare pate would
» need about 1,000 injections to establish enough new hair follicles. Each
» injection would penetrate just 3mm into the skin and would be done under
» local anaesthetic. Kemp’s procedure has been tested on seven volunteers,
» with the next round of clinical trials under way. The first volunteers
» received injections of hair follicle cells into small patches on their
» scalps. “The treated patch was about the size of a 5p piece and the number
» of hairs went up from 250 before the treatment to 316 after,” said Kemp."
» “Dr Bessam Farjo of the Farjo Medical Centre, a hair restoration clinic
» based in Manchester, where the trials are being carried out, said:
» “Current hair transplant techniques take a long time so they cost a lot of
» money. It is very early days but if this new procedure works it would be
» faster and cheaper.””
»
» Summary of key points:
» * Bringing an NW7 to a NW1 is “unlikely” due to the number of injections
» required. It appears to say that an NW7 or thereabouts would need about
» 1000 injections. What about repeat visits?
» * More reliable than minoxidil, which is rather faint praise. “Looks more
» realistic” than wigs or transplants.
» * Takes at least two months between biopsy and the re-implantation of
» cells.
» * Phase I average hair count was 250 baseline to 316; this is where the
» average of 66 new hairs came from.
» * According to Dr Farjo if this works it will be faster and cheaper than a
» transplant.
»
» That is how things stood in October 2006, some fifteen months ago now.
» Interviews with Kemp, Cotsarelis and someone from Aderans would be
» interesting right about now.

All knowed things… now is 2008, we expect evidences about this product… if not, their pubblic policy seems to be only an ideal marketing to control the stock exchange…:stuck_out_tongue: :wink:


#7

SPQR, I agree. /NT