Home | News | Find a Doctor | Ask a Question | Free

Donor Sealing and wounds -> promising research


#1

Hello all,

The following article seems to be a strong link between donor sealing (pioneered by Dr. Arvind Poswal ) and healing of wounds. I feel it explains the absence of white dots after Dr. Poswal’s FUSE treatment. Maybe even Dr. Woods (Australia) should read this and ponder over the benefits of donor sealing.

http://timesofindia.indiatimes.com/Gel_from_patients_blood_helps_healing/articleshow/2068125.cms

Gel from patient’s blood helps healing

23 May, 2007 l 0339 hrs IST (REUTERS)

WASHINGTON: Treating skin wounds with a gel made from a patient’s own blood platelets speeded healing, researchers said in a study showing how doctors may be able to harness the body’s innate healing ability.

Skin wounds treated with this gel healed about 10% more quickly than wounds in the same people treated with only an antibiotic ointment, Monday’s study in the Archives of Facial Plastic Surgery showed.

The researchers cautioned that this was a small pilot study — only eight people were examined — but said the concept could change the way doctors deal with wounds, from surgical incisions to, potentially, internal injuries.

“I’m excited about it because it changes our way of thinking about wounds. Instead of passively just watching it heal, we can now actively intervene to possibly speed it up,” said study leader Dr David Hom of the University of Cincinnati College of Medicine in Ohio.

Hom said in a telephone interview that improving wound healing could get patients out of the hospital and home more quickly after surgery, reduce the chances of complications and help people such as diabetics or chemotherapy patients prone to poor healing.

Hom said the next step was to put together a larger study to test the concept.

Wounds that ordinarily would heal fully in 28 to 30 days instead healed two to three days more quickly when the concentrated topical gel was applied to them, Hom said.

The researchers processed a patient’s own blood into a concentrated plasma packed with platelets — vital to blood clotting — and then into a gel that could be applied directly to the wound. Four men and four women volunteered to get 10 small wounds, five on each thigh. The gel was applied to the wounds on one thigh but not the other, and the healing process was tracked for six months.

“By concentrating a person’s own blood and giving it back to the patient into the patient’s wound, we basically concentrated the growth factors (proteins) which are important in wound healing in attempting to improve their healing,” Hom said.


#2

» Hello all,
»
» The following article seems to be a strong link between donor sealing
» (pioneered by Dr. Arvind Poswal ) and healing of wounds. I feel it
» explains the absence of white dots after Dr. Poswal’s FUSE treatment.
» Maybe even Dr. Woods (Australia) should read this and ponder over the
» benefits of donor sealing.
»
»
» http://timesofindia.indiatimes.com/Gel_from_patients_blood_helps_healing/articleshow/2068125.cms
»
»
» Gel from patient’s blood helps healing
»
» 23 May, 2007 l 0339 hrs IST (REUTERS)
»
» WASHINGTON: Treating skin wounds with a gel made from a patient’s own
» blood platelets speeded healing, researchers said in a study showing how
» doctors may be able to harness the body’s innate healing ability.
»
» Skin wounds treated with this gel healed about 10% more quickly than
» wounds in the same people treated with only an antibiotic ointment,
» Monday’s study in the Archives of Facial Plastic Surgery showed.
»
» The researchers cautioned that this was a small pilot study — only eight
» people were examined — but said the concept could change the way doctors
» deal with wounds, from surgical incisions to, potentially, internal
» injuries.
»
» “I’m excited about it because it changes our way of thinking about wounds.
» Instead of passively just watching it heal, we can now actively intervene
» to possibly speed it up,” said study leader Dr David Hom of the University
» of Cincinnati College of Medicine in Ohio.
»
» Hom said in a telephone interview that improving wound healing could get
» patients out of the hospital and home more quickly after surgery, reduce
» the chances of complications and help people such as diabetics or
» chemotherapy patients prone to poor healing.
»
» Hom said the next step was to put together a larger study to test the
» concept.
»
» Wounds that ordinarily would heal fully in 28 to 30 days instead healed
» two to three days more quickly when the concentrated topical gel was
» applied to them, Hom said.
»
» The researchers processed a patient’s own blood into a concentrated plasma
» packed with platelets — vital to blood clotting — and then into a gel that
» could be applied directly to the wound. Four men and four women
» volunteered to get 10 small wounds, five on each thigh. The gel was
» applied to the wounds on one thigh but not the other, and the healing
» process was tracked for six months.
»
» “By concentrating a person’s own blood and giving it back to the patient
» into the patient’s wound, we basically concentrated the growth factors
» (proteins) which are important in wound healing in attempting to improve
» their healing,” Hom said.

This article implies only that donor sealing speeds up the healing process but is this necessarily a good thing for the end result? I have not seen any evidence of that.


#3

» » Hello all,
» »
» » The following article seems to be a strong link between donor sealing
» » (pioneered by Dr. Arvind Poswal ) and healing of wounds. I feel it
» » explains the absence of white dots after Dr. Poswal’s FUSE treatment.
» » Maybe even Dr. Woods (Australia) should read this and ponder over the
» » benefits of donor sealing.

» This article implies only that donor sealing speeds up the healing process
» but is this necessarily a good thing for the end result? I have not seen
» any evidence of that. Only the contrary.

Sorry, but I failed to see the connection. Donor Sealing is not mentioned in the article anywhere. They use some of the patients own blood to create a gel that is effective in wound healing. How did we go from that to donor sealing?


#4

Dr. A’s donor sealing, from what I understand, uses graft trimmings (bits of epithelium, dermis, subcutaneous tissues, etc.). Please correct me if I am wrong.

The technique described in the article involves using the patient’s blood, specifically the platelets.

I am amused by the article because this is not a new technique. It is sometimes called PRP or protein rich plasma. It speeds soft tissue healing, especially around bone grafts. The doctor starts an IV on the patient and takes out a significant amount of blood. The blood is separated into protein-rich plasma and protein-poor plasma. The protein rich plasma or PRP is then placed around the soft tissue that needs to heal after the surgery.


#5

» Dr. A’s donor sealing, from what I understand, uses graft trimmings (bits
» of epithelium, dermis, subcutaneous tissues, etc.). Please correct me if
» I am wrong.
»
» The technique described in the article involves using the patient’s blood,
» specifically the platelets.
»
» I am amused by the article because this is not a new technique. It is
» sometimes called PRP or protein rich plasma. It speeds soft tissue
» healing, especially around bone grafts. The doctor starts an IV on the
» patient and takes out a significant amount of blood. The blood is
» separated into protein-rich plasma and protein-poor plasma. The protein
» rich plasma or PRP is then placed around the soft tissue that needs to
» heal after the surgery.

donor sealing should be avoided…


#6

As has been pointed out before (I believe by Jessica), this is really nothing new and has been used for years to attempt to accelerate wound healing. Heck, I even saw it on Discovery Health when it was used to successfully treat a snake bite victim who had a gaping hole in his abdomen from the necrosis-causing venom. The epsiode is several years old.


#7

» As has been pointed out before (I believe by Jessica), this is really
» nothing new and has been used for years to attempt to accelerate wound
» healing. Heck, I even saw it on Discovery Health when it was used to
» successfully treat a snake bite victim who had a gaping hole in his
» abdomen from the necrosis-causing venom. The epsiode is several years old.

At least one HT doc (Carlos Uebel) has used PRP to process grafts and claims an increased yield versus non-treated grafts. The platelets, once activated, release a lot of growth and angiogenesis factors. (edited for spelling)


#8

» As has been pointed out before (I believe by Jessica), this is really
» nothing new and has been used for years to attempt to accelerate wound
» healing. Heck, I even saw it on Discovery Health when it was used to
» successfully treat a snake bite victim who had a gaping hole in his
» abdomen from the necrosis-causing venom. The epsiode is several years old.

I heard the same thing that this is nothing new and a lot of docs are already doing this.