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Does a transplanted hair include the eractor pili muscle?


#1

If you look at the following you see that each hair has attached a tiny muscle fiber called eractor pili.

Do the hair transplant surgeon also transplant it as part of the hair follicle ?


#2

» If you look at the following you see that each hair has attached a tiny
» muscle fiber called eractor pili.
»
» Do the hair transplant surgeon also transplant it as part of the hair
» follicle ?
»
» http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Hair_follicle

What is the significance of that?


#3

» If you look at the following you see that each hair has attached a tiny
» muscle fiber called eractor pili.
»
» Do the hair transplant surgeon also transplant it as part of the hair
» follicle ?
»
» http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Hair_follicle

The erector Pili is transected during the procedure. In fact it is important that this is done in FUE since it will otherwise hold the hair in place and will rip the follicle when pulled out. I have no idea what happens to the residual muscle but based on the transection or movement of smooth muscle in reconstructive and vascular surgery, it will re-attach but will of cause be shorter. I think it would be difficult to perform a good study relating to its significance unfortunately.


#4

» » If you look at the following you see that each hair has attached a tiny
» » muscle fiber called eractor pili.
» »
» » Do the hair transplant surgeon also transplant it as part of the hair
» » follicle ?
» »
» » http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Hair_follicle
»
» What is the significance of that?

His question is a very important question!

Most HT Docs out there always mention how important it is to extract (via FUE or FUT) “INTACT” and not “TRANSECTED” hair follicles.

In regard the arrector pili muscle, which actually IS a (important) PART of an “INTACT” hair follicle AND its whole biology, it is practically impossible to extract “INTACT” hair follicles!

In fact, EVERY extracted hair follicle (resp. Follicular Units), which has been extracted via traditional HT’s, IS - in fact - transected (!), and the missing part of the arrector pili muscle have to REGENERATE, as well as the interrupted blood and lymph vessels, what’s important in general, to keep transplanted hair follicel alive.


#5

» » » If you look at the following you see that each hair has attached a
» tiny
» » » muscle fiber called eractor pili.
» » »
» » » Do the hair transplant surgeon also transplant it as part of the hair
» » » follicle ?
» » »
» » » http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Hair_follicle
» »
» » What is the significance of that?
»
» His question is a very important question!
»
» Most HT Docs out there always mention how important it is to extract (via
» FUE or FUT) “INTACT” and not “TRANSECTED” hair follicles.
»
» In regard the arractor pili muscle, which actually IS a (important) PART
» of an “INTACT” hair follicle AND its whole biology, it is practically
» impossible to extract “INTACT” hair follicles!
»
» In fact, EVERY extracted hair follicle (resp. Follicular Units), which has
» been extracted via traditional HT’s, IS - in fact - transected (!), and the
» missing part of the arractor pili muscle have to REGENERATE, as well as the
» interrupted blood and lymph vessels, what’s important in general, to keep
» transplanted hair follicel alive.

cool, as important as it sounds, since it is buried underneath the skin, there is really no way to tell if the doctor took out the follicule correctly or not, does that make sense?


#6

» » If you look at the following you see that each hair has attached a tiny
» » muscle fiber called eractor pili.
» »
» » Do the hair transplant surgeon also transplant it as part of the hair
» » follicle ?
» »
» » http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Hair_follicle
»
» What is the significance of that?

It’s a small muscle attached to the base of each hair which, when contracted, causes the hair to stand erect (such as what happens to the hair on your arm when you get a chill).

Part of the muscle could be included in a graft that is transplanted (depending on how much extra tissue is extracted with the follicular unit) but it wouldn’t serve any functional purpose.


#7

Stupid response


#8

» » » If you look at the following you see that each hair has attached a
» tiny
» » » muscle fiber called eractor pili.
» » »
» » » Do the hair transplant surgeon also transplant it as part of the hair
» » » follicle ?
» » »
» » » http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Hair_follicle
» »
» » What is the significance of that?
»
» It’s a small muscle attached to the base of each hair which,
» when contracted, causes the hair to stand erect (such as what happens to the
» hair on your arm when you get a chill).
»
» Part of the muscle could be included in a graft that is transplanted
» (depending on how much extra tissue is extracted with the follicular unit)
» but it wouldn’t serve any functional purpose.

What the hell …


#9

» If you look at the following you see that each hair has attached a tiny
» muscle fiber called eractor pili.
»
» Do the hair transplant surgeon also transplant it as part of the hair
» follicle ?
»
» http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Hair_follicle

Dear superfred,
That is an interesting question.
Indeed, the erector pili will be transected whether it be strip or fue.
I assume that the hair will lose ability to give goosebumps in certain special situations. I will try to look up the literature to see if it can have additional effects, though I seriously doubt anything has been written about this topic.
Nevertheless, it is an interesting offshoot.
Regards and thanks,
Dr. A


#10

» » If you look at the following you see that each hair has attached a tiny
» » muscle fiber called eractor pili.
» »
» » Do the hair transplant surgeon also transplant it as part of the hair
» » follicle ?
» »
» » http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Hair_follicle
»
» Dear superfred,
» That is an interesting question.
» Indeed, the erector pili will be transected whether it be strip or fue.
» I assume that the hair will lose ability to give goosebumps in certain
» special situations. I will try to look up the literature to see if it can
» have additional effects, though I seriously doubt anything has been written
» about this topic.
» Nevertheless, it is an interesting offshoot.
» Regards and thanks,
» Dr. A

Dr.A is right. I’d only add that transplanted hair feels numb and the severed muscle is in my opinion the primary cause of that. Those “certain
special situations” are for example when your partner runs her hand through your hair - in the naturally growing areas the feeling is wonderful due to the muscles beeing gently stimulated - the transplanted area feels like you have brushes attached there that don’t quite belong to your body. Perrsonal observation.


#11

» I will try to look up the literature to see if it can
» have additional effects, though I seriously doubt anything has been written
» about this topic.
» Nevertheless, it is an interesting offshoot.
» Regards and thanks,
» Dr. A


Pattern Hair Loss. Getting to the Root of it

* Prof Rod Sinclair, Departments of Medicine (Dermatology), The University of Melbourne and St Vincent’s Hospital Melbourne, Australia

Male Pattern Hair Loss is a near universal finding in men and Female Pattern Hair Loss affects at least 60% of all women to some degree. Pattern hair loss is the most common trichological presentation to dermatologists. Diagnosis of female pattern hair loss is problematic, particularly in the early stages. Treatment options are limited, guidelines for therapy are not universally agreed, maintenance therapy is usually required and patient adherence to long term therapy is often poor.

The hair follicle is a complete mini-organ that comprises epithelial, mesenchymal and neural tissue. The arrector pili muscle inserts into the hair follicle at the level of the bulge and separates the upper follicle (isthmus and infundibulum) from bulb. The bulb is the lowest portion of the follicle and undergoes cyclical involution and regeneration. In contrast to classical drawings in dermatology textbooks, a single arrector pili muscle may serve 2-5 follicles within scalp follicular units.

Computer generated 3-D reconstructions of the arrector pili muscle have been used to generate a new model for scalp hair growth that could explain why women with androgenetic alopecia can lose up to 50% of their scalp hair volume without visible balding; why women develop diffuse hair loss rather than complete baldness and why hair follicle miniaturization is irreversible in androgenetic alopecia but not alopecia areata. We use this model to generate new therapeutic targets for the treatment of hair

Source: http://www.hair2010.org/abstract/198.asp