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Distinguishing AGA from TE


#1

Distinguishing Androgenetic Alopecia From Chronic Telogen Effluvium When Associated in the Same Patient - A Simple Noninvasive Method

Background:

Distinguishing chronic telogen effluvium (CTE) from androgenetic alopecia (AGA) may be difficult especially when associated in the same patient.

Observations:
One hundred consecutive patients with hair loss who were clinically diagnosed as having CTE,AGA, AGA+CTE, or remitting CTE. Patients washed their hair in the sink in a standardized way. All shed hairs were counted and divided “blindly” into 5 cm or longer,intermediate length (>3 to <5 cm), and 3 cm or shorter.
The latter were considered telogen vellus hairs, and patients having at least 10% of them were classified as having AGA. We assumed that patients shedding 200 hairs or more had CTE. The k statistic revealed, however, that the best concordance between clinical and numerical diagnosis (k=0.527) was obtained by setting the cutoff shedding value at 100 hairs or more. Of the 100 patients, 18 with 10% or more of hairs that were 3 cm or shorter and who shed fewer than 100 hairs were diagnosed as having AGA;
34 with fewer than 10% of hairs that were 3 cm or shorter and who shed at least 100 hairs were diagnosed as having CTE; 34 with 10% or more of hairs that were 3 cm or shorter and who shed at least 100 hairs were diagnosed as having AGA +CTE; and 14 with fewer than 10% of hairs that were 3 cm or shorter and who shed fewer than 100 hairs were diagnosed as having CTE in remission.

Conclusion:
This method is simple, noninvasive, and suitable for office evaluation.


#2

Men usually don’t get TE. TE is mostly for women.


#3

Acute telogen effluvium can occur in either sex if the proper inciting conditions occur.

http://www.emedicine.com/derm/TOPIC416.HTM