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"Celebrity Hair Transplants are on the Rise"


#1

I just noticed this baloney on Dr Cole’s website:

http://www.forhair.com/celebrity-hair-transplants-are-on-the-rise/

Articles like this are intended to encourage average guys to get hair transplants (“If rich celebrities are doing it, then it must be a good idea!”). Except there is no actual evidence to show that more celebrities are getting hair transplants than they were before.

Dr Cole shows six celebrity “Before and After” photos. But one of the celebrities is Billy Bob Thornton, who wears a hairpiece. Knowing Billy Bob’s Norwood status, and knowing that he usually wears a hairpiece, look at this BEFORE/AFTER photo, and tell me it isn’t blatantly misleading:

Dr Cole also shows a photo of Jude Law, as an example of a “celebrity hair transplant”. I don’t see any evidence of a hair transplant anywhere.

By the way, here’s Jude Law from another source, in May 2015, looking same as before:

As far as the other examples, it’s basically impossible to know whether you’re looking at a hair transplant, cosmetic concealers, a hairpiece, or a combination of the above. Frank Sinatra had a hair transplant (that used to be a HT sales claim). Except they didn’t tell you that his was so bad that he had to wear a hairpiece to hide it. What does a “celebrity hair transplant” prove? Nothing!

Quote: “looks being more important than ever”. Really? Who writes this baloney? This article is clearly intended to make hair transplants seem more socially acceptable, purely for hyping up sales.

The word “doctor” is derived from Latin “docere” which means "to teach”. I believe the main reason that the hair transplant industry is so rotten and corrupt is that most of the doctors are trying to talk the patients into getting surgery, instead of trying to educate them. Patients can’t make truly “informed decisions” based on the promotional baloney that many clinics are putting out. Dr Cole’s article here is an example of this kind of pure hucksterism.

Remember when Dr Cole publicly claimed that he was going to “clean up” the industry? If Dr Cole wants to get started cleaning up the garbage, I don’t think he needs to look very far at all.


#2

This is a fairly common (and in my opinion, sleazy) advertising tactic. Here’s another sub-par clinic using vague referrals to celebrities as a marketing tool:

“If you’re interested in seeing what kind of effect a hair transplant can have, there are quite a few male celebrities you can research. The first two are Matthew McConaughey and Elton John. While hair transplant technology has come a long way since Elton John had it done, Matthew McConaughey is the perfect example of how this type of procedure can be used to combat thinning hair.”

Elton John wears a hairpiece!

“Since several of these celebs have been open about their experience, researching them is also a great way to learn more about what to expect.”

It’s actually a terrible way to get information about transplants. You learn nothing about how hair transplants work. And it’s quite likely that you’re looking at photos of guys wearing hairpieces or concealers, and imagining that they are transplants.

Also, regarding Dr Cole’s article, he claims that he has transplanted celebrities, and he implies that celebrity transplants show that guys are more open about getting transplants done.

“Today, hair restoration is becoming more accepted than ever, even outside the celebrity scene, and men no longer need to be ashamed of undergoing hair transplant surgery.”

But Dr Cole can’t get any celebrities to come forward with their names and photos. Isn’t that ironic? At least when Bosley talks about celebrity hair transplants, they can actually point to specific celebrities who have used the clinic, instead of “celebrities in general”. The truth seems to be that the vast majority of guys would feel ashamed if anyone knew that they had a hair transplant.

In my opinion, any clinic that uses celebrities as a marketing tool lacks integrity; It’s a way to “soften up” potential patients by lying about how socially acceptable transplants are, and it’s sleazy.