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Can we end hair loss in the next 10 years? Meet the contenders


#1

Written by: Jason Stevenson,
Date: Not Sure
Link: http://www.bestlifeonline.com/cms/publish/best-body/Curing_Baldness.shtml

Follicular Delivery
Despite its simple outward appearance, the skin is actually a multilayered dynamic shield that not only blocks infections, but also can frustrate the delivery of hormones, nutrients, and genes to hair follicles. Follicular delivery methods will strengthen the effects of existing drugs such as Propecia and Rogaine, as well as create better delivery of future drugs, stem-cell treatments, and adjunct treatments, like delivering nutrients to recently injected stem cells to help them grow new hair. Multiple research labs are currently testing new combinations of lasers, molecules, and lipids that can pass through the skin’s defenses to transport treatments—including existing drugs such as finasteride—to where they are needed most. “These new follicular delivery systems are very exciting and just two to five years away from clinical use,” says Wilma Bergfeld, a dermatologist at the Cleveland Clinic. Follicular delivery techniques are already being used by some practitioners and in some clinical trials in Berlin, Germany.

Hair Multiplication
Exploiting the regenerative ability of stem cells, hair manipulation will create an endless supply of bald-resistant natural hair. The process begins by harvesting healthy hair follicles resistant to androgenic baldness from the back and sides of the head. Next, key stem cells are extracted from these follicles and replicated or amplified in a lab. Finally, these mass-produced follicles are injected back into bare areas of the scalp. Some lab tests have shown that new follicles can even encourage nearby dormant follicles to regenerate and grow hair. If a man’s hair starts to thin again after this procedure, he could return to his doctor for a top-up injection of his own cells to grow more hair. Researchers at two U.S.-based labs are pursuing stem-cell research, while some men are participating in early hair multiplication trials in the United Kingdom, though commercialization is at least five to 10 years away, according to Dr. Bergfeld and Robert Bernstein, MD, a clinical professor of dermatology at Columbia University. “As soon as research makes this procedure available, it will be widely disseminated,” predicts Douglas Altchek, MD, a professor of dermatology at New York’s Mount Sinai School of Medicine. The only clinical trials in hair multiplication are in phase one in the U.K.

Gene Translation
Eventually, the permanent cure to baldness will come from gene translation. Just like corn can be modified to resist drought or parasites, human genes will be manipulated in the future to express “hair that is resistant to falling out or shrinking,” says Dr. Altchek. This is complicated gene manipulation that involves going into the genes (using viruses as carriers to rearrange nucleotides in the DNA strands) and turning some genes on and some genes off to create the right expression to prevent hair loss. Eventually, doctors will be able to do these gene manipulations in utero. The tricky part is figuring out which genes express what result. “We don’t want monkey children being born,” explains Dr. Altchek. Dr. Bergfeld says that gene therapy is the furthest away. She and other doctors expect to see clinical studies in 10 years.


#2

» Written by: Jason Stevenson,
» Date: Not Sure
» Link:
» http://www.bestlifeonline.com/cms/publish/best-body/Curing_Baldness.shtml
»
» Follicular Delivery
» Despite its simple outward appearance, the skin is actually a multilayered
» dynamic shield that not only blocks infections, but also can frustrate the
» delivery of hormones, nutrients, and genes to hair follicles. Follicular
» delivery methods will strengthen the effects of existing drugs such as
» Propecia and Rogaine, as well as create better delivery of future drugs,
» stem-cell treatments, and adjunct treatments, like delivering nutrients to
» recently injected stem cells to help them grow new hair. Multiple research
» labs are currently testing new combinations of lasers, molecules, and
» lipids that can pass through the skin’s defenses to transport
» treatments—including existing drugs such as finasteride—to where they are
» needed most. “These new follicular delivery systems are very exciting and
» just two to five years away from clinical use,” says Wilma Bergfeld, a
» dermatologist at the Cleveland Clinic. Follicular delivery techniques are
» already being used by some practitioners and in some clinical trials in
» Berlin, Germany.
»
» Hair Multiplication
» Exploiting the regenerative ability of stem cells, hair manipulation will
» create an endless supply of bald-resistant natural hair. The process begins
» by harvesting healthy hair follicles resistant to androgenic baldness from
» the back and sides of the head. Next, key stem cells are extracted from
» these follicles and replicated or amplified in a lab. Finally, these
» mass-produced follicles are injected back into bare areas of the scalp.
» Some lab tests have shown that new follicles can even encourage nearby
» dormant follicles to regenerate and grow hair. If a man’s hair starts to
» thin again after this procedure, he could return to his doctor for a top-up
» injection of his own cells to grow more hair. Researchers at two U.S.-based
» labs are pursuing stem-cell research, while some men are participating in
» early hair multiplication trials in the United Kingdom, though
» commercialization is at least five to 10 years away, according to Dr.
» Bergfeld and Robert Bernstein, MD, a clinical professor of dermatology at
» Columbia University. “As soon as research makes this procedure available,
» it will be widely disseminated,” predicts Douglas Altchek, MD, a professor
» of dermatology at New York’s Mount Sinai School of Medicine. The only
» clinical trials in hair multiplication are in phase one in the U.K.

»
» Gene Translation
» Eventually, the permanent cure to baldness will come from gene
» translation. Just like corn can be modified to resist drought or parasites,
» human genes will be manipulated in the future to express “hair that is
» resistant to falling out or shrinking,” says Dr. Altchek. This is
» complicated gene manipulation that involves going into the genes (using
» viruses as carriers to rearrange nucleotides in the DNA strands) and
» turning some genes on and some genes off to create the right expression to
» prevent hair loss. Eventually, doctors will be able to do these gene
» manipulations in utero. The tricky part is figuring out which genes express
» what result. “We don’t want monkey children being born,” explains Dr.
» Altchek. Dr. Bergfeld says that gene therapy is the furthest away. She and
» other doctors expect to see clinical studies in 10 years.

Interesting but old, must of been written about the time TRC was in phase one.


#3

Just once I’d like to read about a future MPB cure that is projected to be “6-11 years away.”


#4

I don’t believe in gene manipulation any longer. At least for the following maybe 50 years.

If you think that corn manipulation is a success use google to find info about montsanto. The food-antichrist.


#5

We’re never gonna do gene-modification for MPB in the foreseeable future.

By the time we even understand the MPB & genetic processes well enough to think about a genetic fix, we would have learned more than enough to fix MPB in less radical ways.

And it’s a lot easier & more effective to fix a genetic problem through elimination (read: screening fetuses for MPB and aborting them) than with any amount of monkeying with the genetics of grown adults. As a society we’re not willing to do this harsh stuff yet now, but just wait.


#6

» We’re never gonna do gene-modification for MPB in the foreseeable future.
»
»
» By the time we even understand the MPB & genetic processes well enough to
» think about a genetic fix, we would have learned more than enough to fix
» MPB in less radical ways.
»
» And it’s a lot easier & more effective to fix a genetic problem through
» elimination (read: screening fetuses for MPB and aborting them) than with
» any amount of monkeying with the genetics of grown adults. As a society
» we’re not willing to do this harsh stuff yet now, but just wait.

your statement as to screening for MPB and then aborting the fetuses, is the most vile disgusting, criminal act I can think of

you propose killing newborns if they have a genetic propensity to lose their hair later in life?


#7

Did I say I wanted to implement this process myself tomorrow? Did I say I want all of society to be this way if I could really help it?

Don’t kill the messenger.

The more we find out about altering the human body, the less we’ll eventually hold sacred about it. I can’t help this coming eventuality and neither can anyone else. We can face this coming situation or we can go live with the Amish.

I don’t see any of us complaining when we figure out how to cure a genetic defect. But I see us screaming & whining & refusing to deal with it when the obvious implications of that medical knowledge present themselves.

People want to take all the power over our bodies away from nature when it’s gratifying, but nobody wants to take on the responsibility when it’s time to take over making some of the ugly decisions that nature had been making for us.

(Just look at the 6 billion humans on earth right now. That’s ridiculous. When, exactly, had we been planning to deal with starting to control our numbers? The whole reason we’re in this mess is because we didn’t like nature’s crude methods of controlling our population and we invented around too many of them. AND NOW WE HAVE REFUSED TO ACCEPT ANY OF THE RESPONSIBILITY TO MAKE THOSE UGLY DECISIONS FOR OURSELVES!)


#8

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#9

I don’t think we will have a cure in 10 years. Some of us have been on these boards for 10 yrs continually falling into the trap of optimism


#10

»
» your statement as to screening for MPB and then aborting the fetuses, is
» the most vile disgusting, criminal act I can think of
»
» you propose killing newborns if they have a genetic propensity to lose
» their hair later in life?

FOR ONCE I 100% agree with Hangin …What you said is so shocking ( so not to say EVIL) !!!


#11

You guys are missing my point. I’m not telling you what I personally want to happen. I’m suggesting what might possibly happen with enough time going by.

I also think we will probably see another nuclear bomb used during my lifetime too. But my believing that it will happen does not mean I’m in favor of it.


#12

hanging
your statement as to screening for MPB and then aborting the fetuses, is the most vile disgusting, criminal act I can think of
you propose killing newborns if they have a genetic propensity to lose their hair later in life?

.