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Article on growing teeth


#1

I think it’s just a matter of a little more time before they figure this all out, and that includes growing hair.

Grow-your-own to replace false teethBuzz up!
Digg it
Ian Sample, science correspondent The Guardian, Monday 3 May 2004 09.31 BST Article historyThe British institution of dentures sitting in a glass of water beside the bed could be rendered obsolete by scientists who are confident that people will soon be able to replace lost teeth by growing new ones.
Instead of false teeth, a small ball of cells capable of growing into a new tooth will be implanted where the missing one used to be.

The procedure needs only a local anaesthetic and the new tooth should be fully formed within a few months of the cells being implanted.

Paul Sharpe, a specialist in the field of regenerative dentistry at the Dental Institute of King’s College, London, says the new procedure has distinct advantages over false teeth that require a metal post to be driven into the jaw before being capped with a porcelain or plastic tooth.

“The surgery today can be extensive and you need to have good solid bone in the jaw and that is a major problem for some people,” Professor Sharpe said.

The method could be used on far more patients because the ball of cells that grows into a tooth also produces bone that anchors to the jaw.

The choice of growing a new tooth is likely to appeal to patients. “Anyone who has lost teeth will tell you that, given the chance, they would rather have their own teeth than false ones,” said Prof Sharpe. The average Briton over 50 has lost 12 teeth from a set of 32.

The procedure is fairly simple. Doctors take stem cells from the patient. These are unique in their ability to form any of the tissues that make up the body. By carefully nurturing the stem cells in a laboratory, scientists can nudge the cells down a path that will make them grow into a tooth. After a couple of weeks, the ball of cells, known as a bud, is ready to be implanted. Tests reveal what type of tooth - for example, a molar or an incisor - the bud will form.

Using a local anaesthetic, the tooth bud is inserted through a small incision into the gum. Within months, the cells will have matured into a fully-formed tooth, fused to the jawbone. As the tooth grows, it releases chemicals that encourage nerves and blood vessels to link up with it.

Tests have shown the technique to work in mice, where new teeth took weeks to grow. “There’s no reason why it shouldn’t work in humans, the principles are the same,” said Prof Sharpe.

His team has set up a company, Odontis, to exploit the technique, and has won £400,000 from the National Endowment for Science, Technology and the Arts and the Wellcome Trust.


#2

Hello Topcat:

yes, hairs and teeth are basically the same. Both have a dermal papilla if I remember well.
well, teeth are DHT resistant hehehe, so it could be easier to replace them.

quote:

Tests have shown the technique to work in mice, where new teeth took weeks to grow. “There’s no reason why it shouldn’t work in humans, the principles are the same,” said Prof Sharpe.
<<<
the fücking mice, I hate them. Everything works in mice. I am sure it won’t work in humans. Or so they will tell us. A conspiration of some sort?

His team has set up a company, Odontis, to exploit the technique, and has won £400,000 from the National Endowment for Science, Technology and the Arts and the Wellcome Trust.
<<<

Smells like the grants for ICX.

» I think it’s just a matter of a little more time before they figure this
» all out, and that includes growing hair.
»
» Grow-your-own to replace false teethBuzz up!
» Digg it
» Ian Sample, science correspondent The Guardian, Monday 3 May 2004 09.31
» BST Article historyThe British institution of dentures sitting in a glass
» of water beside the bed could be rendered obsolete by scientists who are
» confident that people will soon be able to replace lost teeth by growing
» new ones.
» Instead of false teeth, a small ball of cells capable of growing into a
» new tooth will be implanted where the missing one used to be.
»
» The procedure needs only a local anaesthetic and the new tooth should be
» fully formed within a few months of the cells being implanted.
»
» Paul Sharpe, a specialist in the field of regenerative dentistry at the
» Dental Institute of King’s College, London, says the new procedure has
» distinct advantages over false teeth that require a metal post to be driven
» into the jaw before being capped with a porcelain or plastic tooth.
»
» “The surgery today can be extensive and you need to have good solid bone
» in the jaw and that is a major problem for some people,” Professor Sharpe
» said.
»
» The method could be used on far more patients because the ball of cells
» that grows into a tooth also produces bone that anchors to the jaw.
»
» The choice of growing a new tooth is likely to appeal to patients. “Anyone
» who has lost teeth will tell you that, given the chance, they would rather
» have their own teeth than false ones,” said Prof Sharpe. The average Briton
» over 50 has lost 12 teeth from a set of 32.
»
» The procedure is fairly simple. Doctors take stem cells from the patient.
» These are unique in their ability to form any of the tissues that make up
» the body. By carefully nurturing the stem cells in a laboratory, scientists
» can nudge the cells down a path that will make them grow into a tooth.
» After a couple of weeks, the ball of cells, known as a bud, is ready to be
» implanted. Tests reveal what type of tooth - for example, a molar or an
» incisor - the bud will form.
»
» Using a local anaesthetic, the tooth bud is inserted through a small
» incision into the gum. Within months, the cells will have matured into a
» fully-formed tooth, fused to the jawbone. As the tooth grows, it releases
» chemicals that encourage nerves and blood vessels to link up with it.
»
» Tests have shown the technique to work in mice, where new teeth took weeks
» to grow. “There’s no reason why it shouldn’t work in humans, the principles
» are the same,” said Prof Sharpe.
»
» His team has set up a company, Odontis, to exploit the technique, and has
» won £400,000 from the National Endowment for Science, Technology and the
» Arts and the Wellcome Trust.


#3

Isn’t that article 5 years old. You would think they would have made some progress by now, but I don’t recall hearing any news about it.


#4

People who need lots of teeth replaced are probably reading 5-year-old articles about Intercytex and saying, “Jesus Christ! They’re already curing baldness, and they still can’t fix something basic like my poor missing teeth!”


#5

» People who need lots of teeth replaced are probably reading 5-year-old
» articles about Intercytex and saying, “Jesus Christ! They’re already
» curing baldness, and they still can’t fix something basic like my poor
» missing teeth!”

Geez! I didn’t saw the date. Topcat, what are you doing posting 5yo articles?


#6

»
» Geez! I didn’t saw the date. Topcat, what are you doing posting 5yo
» articles?

My bad, I should have noticed the date. I knew I read something about this in the past. But it is kind of funny that it’s about 5 years later and they still haven’t brought it to market.


#7

» »
» » Geez! I didn’t saw the date. Topcat, what are you doing posting 5yo
» » articles?
»
» My bad, I should have noticed the date. I knew I read something about this
» in the past. But it is kind of funny that it’s about 5 years later and they
» still haven’t brought it to market.

Heres a article from 2009 http://articles.sun-sentinel.com/2009-09-13/features/0909100263_1_cells-replacement-teeth-tissue-engineering

also i think cals comments are right on this thread…


#8

» » »
» » » Geez! I didn’t saw the date. Topcat, what are you doing posting 5yo
» » » articles?
» »
» » My bad, I should have noticed the date. I knew I read something about
» this
» » in the past. But it is kind of funny that it’s about 5 years later and
» they
» » still haven’t brought it to market.
»
» Heres a article from 2009
» http://articles.sun-sentinel.com/2009-09-13/features/0909100263_1_cells-replacement-teeth-tissue-engineering
»
» also i think cals comments are right on this thread…

50 years is too far to talk about this “teeth-thing” at the moment. people who has problems don’t get their own new regrown theeth anyway during their life.


#9

» People who need lots of teeth replaced are probably reading 5-year-old
» articles about Intercytex and saying, “Jesus Christ! They’re already
» curing baldness, and they still can’t fix something basic like my poor
» missing teeth!”

implantology

people can have teeth at the moment

but people can’t have hair