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5 ways to predict hair loss


#1

There are five ways to “predict” future baldness:

  1. “Folliscope” - Because hair loss happens slowly and subtly over time, new technology, like the Folliscope, can provide a microscopic view of the scalp to determine the status of a patient’s hair follicles. Hair caliber and hair density can be measured and compared in different areas and over time. Taking a set of high-resolution “global” photos, or “medical mug-shots,” is also helpful for tracking hair changes year-by-year.

  2. “Health Factors” - In recent years, research has found that personal health factors like illness, smoking, stress, menopause, crash dieting, poor nutrition and certain types of medications are associated with hair loss.

  3. “Genetic Testing” - While the results are not like a pregnancy test (i.e., a ‘yes’ or ‘no’), a new genetic test by HairDX is a promising option for patients who want to know their risk of future hair loss. The analysis uses a simple cheek swab and can determine the genetic risk of developing male and female hair loss. The test should be performed under a doctor’s supervision and the results should be reviewed with a hair restoration physician who can help the patient interpret the results and weigh preventative treatment options.

  4. “Review Family History” - Contrary to popular belief, hair loss can be due to genetic factors from both sides of the family, so a good way to determine a patient’s chances for future hair loss is to examine relatives on both the mother and father’s side. Full-headed families are not completely out of the woods. However, patients who have a high number of close relatives with hair loss are more likely to experience it themselves.

  5. “See a Hair Doctor” - The best way for patients to assess their “hair status,” find reliable information about the medical causes of hair loss, and learn about safe, medically-proven treatments is to visit a board certified hair restoration physician. To find a qualified doctor who specializes in hair loss, visit www.abhrs.org or www.ishrs.org.


#2

» http://www.prweb.com/releases/2008/5/prweb936924.htm
»
» There are five ways to “predict” future baldness:
»
» 1. “Folliscope” - Because hair loss happens slowly and subtly over time,
» new technology, like the Folliscope, can provide a microscopic view of the
» scalp to determine the status of a patient’s hair follicles. Hair caliber
» and hair density can be measured and compared in different areas and over
» time. Taking a set of high-resolution “global” photos, or “medical
» mug-shots,” is also helpful for tracking hair changes year-by-year.
»
» 2. “Health Factors” - In recent years, research has found that personal
» health factors like illness, smoking, stress, menopause, crash dieting,
» poor nutrition and certain types of medications are associated with hair
» loss.
»
» 3. “Genetic Testing” - While the results are not like a pregnancy test
» (i.e., a ‘yes’ or ‘no’), a new genetic test by HairDX is a promising option
» for patients who want to know their risk of future hair loss. The analysis
» uses a simple cheek swab and can determine the genetic risk of developing
» male and female hair loss. The test should be performed under a doctor’s
» supervision and the results should be reviewed with a hair restoration
» physician who can help the patient interpret the results and weigh
» preventative treatment options.
»
» 4. “Review Family History” - Contrary to popular belief, hair loss can
» be due to genetic factors from both sides of the family, so a good way to
» determine a patient’s chances for future hair loss is to examine relatives
» on both the mother and father’s side. Full-headed families are not
» completely out of the woods. However, patients who have a high number of
» close relatives with hair loss are more likely to experience it
» themselves.
»
» 5. “See a Hair Doctor” - The best way for patients to assess their
» “hair status,” find reliable information about the medical causes of hair
» loss, and learn about safe, medically-proven treatments is to visit a board
» certified hair restoration physician. To find a qualified doctor who
» specializes in hair loss, visit www.abhrs.org or www.ishrs.org.

some of these are ok except number 5, hair transplant surgeons , many times are not even qualified to be surgeons. they can take a weekend course, and be a general practitioner, then come back to their office and hang out a sign saying, HAIR TRANSPLANT DOCTOR

its that unregulated and wild wild west

I would not even consider a qualified hair transplant surgeon…to be a …Hair doctor…Implying that they understand hair loss,

I went to a dermatologist, back in the early thinning days, and you would think they know hair loss, wrong assumption, guy basically said, if your father lost his hair so will you. Gee thanks Professor


#3

»
» its that unregulated and wild wild west
»
» I would not even consider a qualified hair transplant surgeon…to be
» a …Hair doctor…Implying that they understand hair loss,
»
» I went to a dermatologist, back in the early thinning days, and you would
» think they know hair loss, wrong assumption, guy basically said, if your
» father lost his hair so will you. Gee thanks Professor

I could not agree more. Why must someone see a “hair restoration specialist” to interpret a DNA test? That’s laughable.

I disagree about dermatologists, however. I went to see one early on in my hairloss, and she put me on Propecia, Minoxodil, and Nizoral (and that was long before it was commonly known that Nizoral was a useful treatment). 10 years on, and I’ve kept most of my hair. See a good dermatologist. Period. They are the only “specialists” that are actually “specialists” in the area of skin and hair conditions. They have no financial incentive to push you in one direction, and will be more likely to inform you of non-surgical, preventative treatments.

The only reason anyone should see a transplant surgeon is to get a hair transplant, and even then the buyer should beware.


#4

» »
» » its that unregulated and wild wild west
» »
» » I would not even consider a qualified hair transplant surgeon…to
» be
» » a …Hair doctor…Implying that they understand hair loss,
» »
» » I went to a dermatologist, back in the early thinning days, and you
» would
» » think they know hair loss, wrong assumption, guy basically said, if
» your
» » father lost his hair so will you. Gee thanks Professor
»
» I could not agree more. Why must someone see a “hair restoration
» specialist” to interpret a DNA test? That’s laughable.
»
» I disagree about dermatologists, however. I went to see one early on in
» my hairloss, and she put me on Propecia, Minoxodil, and Nizoral (and that
» was long before it was commonly known that Nizoral was a useful treatment).
» 10 years on, and I’ve kept most of my hair. See a good dermatologist.
» Period. They are the only “specialists” that are actually “specialists” in
» the area of skin and hair conditions. They have no financial incentive to
» push you in one direction, and will be more likely to inform you of
» non-surgical, preventative treatments.
»
» The only reason anyone should see a transplant surgeon is to get a hair
» transplant, and even then the buyer should beware.

when i went to my dermatologist, they didnt have rogaine propecia or nizoral, that tells u something about how long ago

going to a hair transplant doc to ask about your hairloss is like going to ask a car salesman if he thinks you need a new car


#5

»
» when i went to my dermatologist, they didn’t have rogaine propecia or
» nizoral, that tells u something about how long ago
»
» going to a hair transplant doc to ask about your hairloss is like going to
» ask a car salesman if he thinks you need a new car

No kidding - very strange advice. I’ve never heard anyone say, “if you think your hair is thinning, see a hair transplant surgeon”. As mentioned before, any doctor can claim to be a hair transplant surgeon. There is no speciality attached to it (other than general surgery, I hope!). They aren’t cosmetic surgeons (one of the most competitive and technical of all specialties), and they certainly aren’t dermatologists (another very competitive and intensive speciality). Any Mexican med-school grad can take a weekend course and start advertising themselves as “hair restoration specialists”.

Prior to the development of “the Big 3”, going to a dermatologist was a waste of time; they couldn’t do anything for you except tell you what you already knew (unless you had some kind of fungus or other problem that could have been causing your hair loss). Today, dermatologists are much more knowledgeable about hair loss prevention, and there are actually products they can proscribe that will help.