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Why I think that repeat injections could work better

Great, my point was never that stem cells in general can’t be cultured. I’m sorry if you misunderstood that.

I was talking about what Cots and Garza said about HAIR FOLLICLE STEM CELLS and HAIR FOLLICLE PROGENITOR CELLS.

I thought that was clear from the context.

Good link, good find.

I’ve found some articles like this too, and I’d wondered if these techniques could help researchers working on trying to culture HF stem cells.

It’s clear now.

I wonder if Dr. Nigam has basically done some kind of info search about all the possible methods to do stem cell cultures and found one that works?

I really like this method:

http://med.stanford.edu/ism/2010/july/muscle-stem.html

They are basically “tricking” the stem cells into thinking they’re still in their normal position in the body!

In a quick search I found perhaps 3 or 4 different articles about culturing stem cells. I liked this one a lot.

http://med.stanford.edu/ism/2010/july/muscle-stem.html

I wonder what Dr. Nigam is doing to culture HF stem cells.

That’s right and I can’t think of any reason why a researcher wouldn’t be able to do that with HF stem cells.

[quote][postedby]Originally Posted by jarjarbinx[/postedby]
That’s right and I can’t think of any reason why a researcher wouldn’t be able to do that with HF stem cells.[/quote]

I agree.

So perhaps we find out what Dr. Nigam is doing to culture HF stem cells because even if he’s multiplying stem cells they may not be viable and that could explain why nobody’s getting a full head of hair via cultured stem cells. We should discuss with him trying other methods from the method he is using so that he can try to find a culture method that produces the best results.

[quote][postedby]Originally Posted by jarjarbinx[/postedby]
That’s right and I can’t think of any reason why a researcher wouldn’t be able to do that with HF stem cells.

[postedby]Originally Posted by roger_that[/postedby]

I agree.[/quote]

Good points.

But there is still the issue of progenitor cells. I have only done a quick search and found where scientists have cultured brain progenitor cells but that is all I’ve found so far.

Keep in mind that there’s a normal amount of stem cells in balding scalp tissue and it is the progenitor cells which are in short supply. I think that means it’s more important to be able to culture progenitor cells than stem cells.

although in this study the cultivation was only 2-fold and it says NOTHING about culturing progenitor HF cells:

http://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1111/j.1365-2184.2011.00754.x/abstract

As you are creating/culturing more stem cells some of the ingredients you’re soaking the HF stem cells in is hair growth factors. And don’t hair growth factors cause stem cells to produce hair progenitor cells? And if that is what hair growth factors do then doesn’t it seem that while the stem cells are sitting in culture if part of the culture medium is hair growth factors then those growth factors interacting with the HF stem cells will produce more progenitor cells, right?

Here’s one:

http://www.zen-bio.com/products/cellntec.php

[quote][postedby]Originally Posted by jarjarbinx[/postedby]
But there is still the issue of progenitor cells. I have only done a quick search and found where scientists have cultured brain progenitor cells but that is all I’ve found so far.

Keep in mind that there’s a normal amount of stem cells in balding scalp tissue and it is the progenitor cells which are in short supply. I think that means it’s more important to be able to culture progenitor cells than stem cells.[/quote]

Yes, I agree with that.

Also note that Dr. Nigam says he can “activate” HF stem cells and turn them into progenitor cells by adding certain growth factors.

And that could make sense right? After all, growth factors might actually be the things that turn stem cells into progenitor cells in the follicle but it still might be better for Dr. Nigam to use the technique of trying to trick the stem cells into thinking that they’re in the body still because that might increase the yield.

[quote][postedby]Originally Posted by jarjarbinx[/postedby]
But there is still the issue of progenitor cells. I have only done a quick search and found where scientists have cultured brain progenitor cells but that is all I’ve found so far.

Keep in mind that there’s a normal amount of stem cells in balding scalp tissue and it is the progenitor cells which are in short supply. I think that means it’s more important to be able to culture progenitor cells than stem cells.

[postedby]Originally Posted by roger_that[/postedby]

Yes, I agree with that.

Also note that Dr. Nigam says he can “activate” HF stem cells and turn them into progenitor cells by adding certain growth factors.[/quote]

[quote][postedby]Originally Posted by jarjarbinx[/postedby]
although in this study the cultivation was only 2-fold and it says NOTHING about culturing progenitor HF cells:

http://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1111/j.1365-2184.2011.00754.x/abstract

As you are creating/culturing more stem cells some of the ingredients you’re soaking the HF stem cells in is hair growth factors. And don’t hair growth factors cause stem cells to produce hair progenitor cells? And if that is what hair growth factors do then doesn’t it seem that while the stem cells are sitting in culture if part of the culture medium is hair growth factors then those growth factors interacting with the HF stem cells will produce more progenitor cells, right?[/quote]

Jarjar, regarding your question about growth factors, I would have to say that the RIGHT growth factors have to be used. There are LOTS of different things which are referred to as growth factors, and only certain ones will work. Dr. Nigam has said he believes he knows which ones are necessary to convert HF stem cells into “activated” stem cells, which are progenitor cells.

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