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What happened to Hitzig beard hair auto-cloning?


#1

http://www.ishrs.org/pr-pr3.htm

ISHRS Press Release

“Auto-Cloning” of Beard Hair Used to Increase Supply of Donor Hair for Transplantation to Scalp

NEW YORK (October 16, 2003)- Beard whiskers, carefully removed, may offer an inexhaustible supply of hair for transplantation to the scalp. With proper removal technique, the continued growth of beard hair at the removal site is not compromised.

This “auto-cloning” of beard hairs may be particularly effective for balding men who have little scalp hair left for transplantation, and for persons whose scalps have been scarred by injury or burns, according to Gary Hitzig, MD, New York.

Dr. Hitzig, a physician hair restoration specialist in private practice, reported on the successful “auto-cloning” of beard hair today at the 11th Annual Meeting of the International Society of Hair Transplantation Surgery (ISHRS). The ISHRS is meeting October 15-19 at the Marriott Marquis Hotel, New York City.

The transplantation of beard whiskers to the scalp without compromising continued growth of the beard was undertaken by Dr. Hitzig following research reported by Dr. J.C.Kim, Pook University, Korea. Dr. Kim reported research showing that each human hair can theoretically be split into two, and produce two hairs from one. This requires enough “stem” cells be present in each portion to regenerate the full follicle.

Dr. Hitzig designed a study, enlisting five men, that was based on Dr. Kim’s work. Using a specially designed “tweezing” tool, Dr. Hitzig removed beard hairs from the men by extracting enough of the follicle to produce a new one when implanted, but also leaving enough of the follicle to continue growing new beard hairs at the donor site. This suggested that beard hair would not only not be depleted, but could serve as a non-depleting source of hair for future transplantation. In men who experience hair loss over most of the scalp, so much hair may be lost that little or none is left for transplantation. The lack of donor scalp hair may limit the benefits that these men could realize from transplantation. A non-depleting supply of donor hair could a substantial benefit for these men.

Dr. Hitzig chose coarse hair from the chin or sideburns for transplantation in the reported study; the coarse hair demonstrated greater vitality than finer hair after it was transplanted to the scalp. Earlier studies had shown that less coarse hair had less vitality after transplantation; patients also experienced less discomfort from plucking of hair from the chin or sideburns.

The five men in the study shared the characteristics of age (40-57 years old), having had previous hair transplants, and lack of adequate donor scalp hair for future transplants as balding progressed.

Results of the study demonstrated the potential of bear hair transplantation to the scalp, Dr. Hitzig reported. With the use of coarser chin and sideburn hair, the “take” of beard hairs transplanted to the scalp was more than 80%. Post-transplant hair counts at six months showed increased density of approximately 25 hairs per 30 hairs transplanted. Examination of beards in the five men showed no change in pre-plucked density, suggesting that the follicles left intact had continued to produce new hairs.

The transplanted beard hairs retained their coarse “chin whisker” characteristics after transplantation into the scalp. The thickness of the transplanted beard hairs provided good coverage of the scalp at the transplant site, Dr. Hitzig said.

Expanding upon successful beard hair transplantation in the five men studied, Dr. Hitzig has completed a preliminary study in which several beard hairs were transplanted into scars created by previous harvesting of donor scalp hair. Results of this preliminary study have been encouraging enough to indicate the potential of beard hair transplantation into scarred scalp, Dr. Hitzig said.

Although “auto-cloning” was used to describe Dr. Hitzig’s procedure, no actual cloning was involved. Dr. Hitzig’s process is a transfer of hair and its genetic programming to a new site, where the hair continues to replicate the appearance it had at the donor site.

The “cloning” usually reported in hair restoration studies is in vitro (laboratory dish) replication of hair follicle cells-a technique that is more correctly called tissue engineering. Varying degrees of success have been reported in studies of in vitro replication. True cloning-transfer of genetic material into a cell to replicate a “mother” cell-has not been reported for purposes of hair restoration.

The ISHRS is the world’s largest not-for-profit professional organization in the field of hair restoration surgery, with 512 physician members in 45 countries. The organization was founded in 1992 to promote the advancement of the specialty of hair restoration surgery through education, information-sharing, and observance of ethical standards.

[Based on reprint Dr. Hitzig sent in response to a manuscript for his Annual Meeting presentation: Hitzig GS. Auto-cloning using beard hair. Cosmetic Dermatology 2003; 16:63-69.]


#2

» http://www.ishrs.org/pr-pr3.htm
»
» ISHRS Press Release
»
» “Auto-Cloning” of Beard Hair Used to Increase Supply of Donor Hair for
» Transplantation to Scalp

According to an interview (March 2010) with Dr. Hitzig:

Dr. Hitzig: “Plucked hair duplication involves extracting a hair shaft from an intact follicle and using the DNA present in the bulb of that shaft to regenerate an entirely new follicle. When the plucked hair shaft is re-inserted into the scalp in combination with ACell, we can elicit a new hair growth that cycles normally and is cosmetically acceptable. This is a slightly modified version of a previous “auto-cloning” technique that has had inconsistent results to date.”


#3

Dr Hitzig will be giving an update next week in Boston at the ISHRS meeting.

• New results of an FDA-approved agent for wound healing in hair restoration surgery.
• Cloning technique to duplicate hair follicles and subsequent hair regrowth at donor and recipient sites.

If he has a working system it would mean unlimited donor hair.


#4

» Dr Hitzig will be giving an update next week in Boston at the ISHRS
» meeting.
»
» • New results of an FDA-approved agent for wound healing in hair
» restoration surgery.
» • Cloning technique to duplicate hair follicles and subsequent hair
» regrowth at donor and recipient sites.
»
»
» If he has a working system it would mean unlimited donor hair.

But this time 2 different doctors will report independently about one and the same thing/approaches at the ISHRS meeting:

Source: http://www.ishrs.org/PDF/18ASM_ProgramMailer_FINAL-06-03-10.pdf

Not sure, but I guess Dr. Hitzig will report about his scientific article he mentioned in an interview:


How many patients have you treated?

Dr. Hitzig, March 2010: “The initial cohort I treated was between 18 and 20 people. I am currently writing a scientific article based on the results from this group; explaining the rationale behind the unique regenerative process we’ve observed. Once all of the documentation has been organized and all of the patient follow-ups have been completed, the research will be sent to ACell for verification of claims. Publication should follow shortly thereafter. More recently, however, I’ve been able to treat a slightly larger group with a much wider array of applications. This is the most exciting aspect of my research.”


#5

Hitzig & Cooley have served the press bullsh*t in the area of donor regrowth before. They’re probably trying to do it again.


#6

» Hitzig & Cooley have served the press bullsh*t in the area of donor
» regrowth before. They’re probably trying to do it again.

Yeah, makes sense.

Anyway, they’re already awaiting Hitzig & Cooley in Boston:

Cal’s bullsh’t aside, everything they claimed in their “breakthrough article” (January 2010) is basically TRUE:

http://bignews.biz/?id=832566

But currently, THE REAL BIG PROBLEM is, that the whole thingy doesn’t work on a consistent basis:
According to them (Cooley/Hitzig), currently, the success rate is anywhere between 0 - 400% (increased hair count) and range from “normal” to “amazing” concerning wound healing - and therefore it seems that it depends on the physiology of the person it’s being used on, as well as which application (sheet form, powder form, gel form, liquid form etc) is used. And that’s what they currently try to figure out.


#7

The consistency is the only part of the story worth discussing.

Getting two follicles out of one is not news. It becomes news when they prove they can do it consistently, and when they prove that each new follicle is consistently much greater than half the hair shaft quality that the original one was.

Until this is done, they’re just looking for attention for what others have done before.


#8

» The consistency is the only part of the story worth discussing.
»
» Getting two follicles out of one is not news. It becomes news when they
» prove they can do it consistently, and when they prove that each new
» follicle is consistently much greater than half the hair shaft quality that
» the original one was.
»
» Until this is done, they’re just looking for attention for what others
» have done before.

I’m right there with you.


#9

» » The consistency is the only part of the story worth discussing.
» »
» » Getting two follicles out of one is not news. It
» becomes news when they

» » prove they can do it consistently, and when
» they prove that each new
» » follicle is consistently much greater than half the hair shaft quality
» that
» » the original one was.
» »
» » Until this is done, they’re just looking for attention for what others
» » have done before.
»
» I’m right there with you.

I think this is very encouraging that they are doing a presentation at the ISHRS, this holds promise in my opinion. Granted, everybody says they have consistency issues, at least they are not writing this off entirely so this is still good news. Same with Gho, I hope they all straightened out these so called consistency issues.


#10

ISHRS presentations are worthless. Gho, ICX did these in the last years. Its just propaganda. We won’t get any new info.

Hitzig says his old method was inconsistent?. This is bullshït. The same old bullshït excuse. All the charlatans use the same technique.
First, they sell a “first version” that is something wonderful, but they never prove it, and after many years, when people get tired of waiting for the proof, they launch a “new version” and dismiss the previous version as “inconsistant”; this way the charlatans keep the fools connected.

Inconsistency is not an excuse. Even if the “first version” was inconsistent, this was not an excuse to hide proof. If it worked, even in a small fractions of patients, they would have published data of these patients, but they didn’t do it.

And suppossedly, Hitzig has now a “consistant” version, but the photos are pathetic. The manipulations are primitive, and even with manipulations, we cannot see any result.

» » » The consistency is the only part of the story worth discussing.
» » »
» » » Getting two follicles out of one is not news. It
» » becomes news when they

» » » prove they can do it consistently, and
» when
» » they prove that each new
» » » follicle is consistently much greater than half the hair shaft
» quality
» » that
» » » the original one was.
» » »
» » » Until this is done, they’re just looking for attention for what
» others
» » » have done before.
» »
» » I’m right there with you.
»
» I think this is very encouraging that they are doing a presentation at the
» ISHRS, this holds promise in my opinion. Granted, everybody says they have
» consistency issues, at least they are not writing this off entirely so this
» is still good news. Same with Gho, I hope they all straightened out these
» so called consistency issues.


#11

http://www.prlog.org/11007692-dr-gary-hitzig-to-discuss-uses-of-matristem-in-hair-restoration-at-annual-scientific-meeting.html

Dr. Gary Hitzig to Discuss Uses of MatriStem in Hair Restoration at Annual Scientific Meeting

The 18th Annual Scientific Meeting of the International Society of Hair Restoration Surgeons will take place October 20 – 24, 2010 in Boston, MA.

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE

PRLog (Press Release) – Oct 18, 2010 – Gary Hitzig, M.D., a leading hair transplant researcher and surgeon based in New York, will be part of a panel of experts during a session on hair growth factors and hair graft storage solutions at the 18th Annual Scientific Meeting of the International Society of Hair Restoration Surgeons on October 20, 2010 in Boston, MA. Hitzig, along with Jerry Cooley, M.D., were the first medical doctors to successfully clone hair using the FDA-cleared wound healing powder called MatriStem® MicroMatrix™. Hitzig will specifically discuss and answer questions related to the multiple uses of MatriStem – from scar revision to hair duplication.

MatriStem MicroMatrix, a product of regenerative medicine innovator, ACell, Inc., is a wound healing powder that promotes healing and tissue growth and has now proven to help regenerate hair in the donor and recipient regions of hair transplant patients. While intended for diabetic ulcers, venous ulcers, pressure ulcers, traumatic wounds, second degree burns, surgical wounds (donor sites/grafts) and trauma wounds, Hitzig and Cooley found that its properties offer a broader scope of treatment, including hair cloning. Dr. Hitzig just recently was presented with The Tiberio Award for his presentation on Hair and Scalp Regeneration (cloning) using MatriStem in Capri, Italy (May 2010)

MatriStem fundamentally changes wound healing by triggering new blood vessel formation at the wound site, as well as providing a favorable substrate for host cell attachment, proliferation and differentiation. Hitzig and Cooley have also found that MatriStem causes the body to regenerate the original tissue complete with hair follicles.

The theme of the 18th Annual Scientific Meeting of the ISHRS is revolution and evolution - Advances in Hair Restoration: Revolutionary Concepts and Evolutionary Techniques. This annual meeting is attended by experienced hair restoration surgeons, physicians with an interest in hair restoration surgery and who are new to the field, trichologists, surgical assistants and medical personnel involved in hair restoration surgery procedures, office managers, clinic directors, and consultants who staff hair restoration surgery offices.

About Gary Hitzig, M.D.
Dr. Hitzig is a board certified hair restoration surgeon in New York City. He is also the author of Help and Hope for Hair Loss and developed and patented the Hitzig Linear Punch, a collection of extremely sharp disposable surgical punches that make narrow elliptical slots, which are sold to surgeons around the world. Dr. Hitzig has published numerous peer review articles on hair transplant techniques and is a regular presenter at medical hair restoration symposiums around the world. Dr. Hitzig is a member of the American Society of Dermatological Surgery, International Society of Hair Restoration Surgery and the American Hair Loss Council. He can be reached at (516) 536-0385 or visit www.nyhairloss.com.

— end —

“Hitzig just recently was presented with The Tiberio Award for his presentation on Hair and Scalp Regeneration (cloning) using MatriStem in Capri, Italy (May 2010”

That’s interesting, because I thought he wasn’t in Capri:

http://hairtransplantplanet.com/index.php?option=com_content&view=article&id=91%3Ainterview-with-drkoray-erdogan&catid=38%3Ahair-transplant-surgeon-interview&Itemid=66&lang=es

Martes 29 de Junio de 2010 10:58

Dr.Koray Erdogan INTERVIEW WITH DR.KORAY ERDOGAN

Do you think that you will use Acell to improve the result the result of the transplants and to help the healing of the donor area?

ACELL MATRISTEM: This sounds like urban legend. I am very interested about Acell but could not find enough information like everyone. As you know there was a presentation in Capri about hair cloning using Matristem but Gary HITZIG ( USA) was not there and the presentation was done by Marina PIZZARO ( USA) . So I can not get satisfactory answers for my many questions from Marina although she wanted to help me she was friendly ( she had to give me the phone number of Dr. HITZIG after my endless questions. Now I have to wait the next presentation in Boston. My hesitations are about stimulating possible cancer cells after the operation. So I have to wait till to get satisfactory answers and researches. I am planning to use it especially for the donor area which will be very available after extraction because I know there are many multi- potential cells near to extracted follicular. Over the extracted donor you can easily apply the powder and can stimulate these cells. So may be we can start with the limitless donor area by using Acell before recipient area.


#12

Koray what a motherfucing lying piece of dog sht THIS IS ABSOLUTELY GROTESK

WOW i think we all should get screen shots from thiy lying as*face.

Thanks Iron_Man you destroyed my happy day…what an as*hole this Koray


#13

» http://www.prlog.org/11007692-dr-gary-hitzig-to-discuss-uses-of-matristem-in-hair-restoration-at-annual-scientific-meeting.html
»
»
» Dr. Gary Hitzig to Discuss Uses of MatriStem in Hair Restoration at
» Annual Scientific Meeting

Thanks, Mr. Unknown, for sharing this link with Dr. Rassman, who reported “live” about the ACell presentations on his blog:

BTW - Interesting part:

Dr. Rassman: “Some of these hairs grew (less than 50%), but the good news is that supposedly the site where the hair was plucked also grew out a hair.” (<-- btw: Nice greetings from Dr. Gho! :smiley: )

James - October 22nd, 2010 at 4:18 pm:
“Doc, where did you get that ‘less than 50%’ number? Both Cooley and Hitzig have quoted me 60-80% regrowth.”


#14

Seems the interesting discussion is ongoing …


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