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Unlimited donor hair already today?


#1

I’ve read that hair centers around the world recently started to transplant a new type of synthetic hair, which unlike the older type is coated with collagen that makes it biocompatible.

I’ve heard that in combination with HT (for the hairline), this new synthetic technique can transfer any NW7 to NW1, already today…

What are the downsides they are not telling ?


#2

» What are the downsides they are not telling ?

"Implants are non-living artificial hairs which are anchored into the
scalp with hook-like artificial roots. They are placed individually
into the scalp in a manner that mimics natural hair growth. They are
considered to be a more permanent, and more undetectable alternative
to hairpieces… Artificial hairs are typically made of synthetic
fibers similar to those used for surgical sutures. The materials for
the artificial hairs and artificial roots are selected for strength,
natural-looking appearance, and to minimize rejection as a foreign
substance by the body’s immune system… The body eventually rejects
the artificial hairs however, often producing chronic inflammation and
sometimes scalp infections. In the past, on some occasions, this
disadvantage was not presented accurately to the prospective patients.
The risk of chronic inflammation and scalp infections resulting from
artificial hair implants has resulted in the US Food and Drug
Administration banning the use of artificial hairs as a medical device
in the United States since 1984…

Artificial hair implant procedures are legal in Japan, Mexico, and
some European countries, although there is still plenty of controversy
surrounding their use."


#3

You’ve stated only one downside: rejection (and its byproducts).

The fact that the FDA banned this procedure in 1984 due to body rejection, is irrelevant. The reason is I’m not talking about the outdated procedure that was done back then, rather the new procedures which are done in 2009, which include using artificial hairs coated with collagen, a procedure which minimizes rejection to the minimum.

I wonder if steps are being taken to remove the FDA ban, considering rejection is no longer such a big of an issue.

» » What are the downsides they are not telling ?
»
» “Implants are non-living artificial hairs which are anchored into the
» scalp with hook-like artificial roots. They are placed individually
» into the scalp in a manner that mimics natural hair growth. They are
» considered to be a more permanent, and more undetectable alternative
» to hairpieces… Artificial hairs are typically made of synthetic
» fibers similar to those used for surgical sutures. The materials for
» the artificial hairs and artificial roots are selected for strength,
» natural-looking appearance, and to minimize rejection as a foreign
» substance by the body’s immune system… The body eventually rejects
» the artificial hairs however, often producing chronic inflammation and
» sometimes scalp infections. In the past, on some occasions, this
» disadvantage was not presented accurately to the prospective patients.
» The risk of chronic inflammation and scalp infections resulting from
» artificial hair implants has resulted in the US Food and Drug
» Administration banning the use of artificial hairs as a medical device
» in the United States since 1984…
»
» Artificial hair implant procedures are legal in Japan, Mexico, and
» some European countries, although there is still plenty of controversy
» surrounding their use.”


#4

This is such a bad idea. Besides the rejection, you can’t cut it. Once it is cut, you’re stuck with it at that length or shorter forever. And what happens after a few years (probably a few months), when the color isn’t quite right anymore? And the fiber starts to become ratty looking? Surgically remove all the hairs, and re-implant new ones again?

Even wigs made of synthetic fibers have to be replaced. There is no such thing as a fiber that looks exactly like hair that will last forever. Permanently implanting a synthetic fiber in your head is really, really, a bad, bad, bad, idea.


#5

AJ,

The transplant is not permanent. The transplanted hairs are lost at a rate of ~20% each year. The hair centers who use this procedure claim you need to come every several months to add more hairs instead of those you lost.

I’m not saying this is an ideal solution, yes you need to cut your real hair every month so it will look the same length as the artificial hair, but at least this could bring you back to NW1 already today, no matter how bad your situation is. Then, 5-10 years from now when HM is available, you’ll switch to living hair.

» This is such a bad idea. Besides the rejection, you can’t cut it. Once it
» is cut, you’re stuck with it at that length or shorter forever. And what
» happens after a few years (probably a few months), when the color isn’t
» quite right anymore? And the fiber starts to become ratty looking?
» Surgically remove all the hairs, and re-implant new ones again?
»
» Even wigs made of synthetic fibers have to be replaced. There is no such
» thing as a fiber that looks exactly like hair that will last forever.
» Permanently implanting a synthetic fiber in your head is really, really, a
» bad, bad, bad, idea.


#6

» AJ,
»
» The transplant is not permanent. The transplanted hairs are lost at a rate
» of ~20% each year. The hair centers who use this procedure claim you need
» to come every several months to add more hairs instead of those you lost.
»
» I’m not saying this is an ideal solution, yes you need to cut your real
» hair every month so it will look the same length as the artificial hair,
» but at least this could bring you back to NW1 already today, no matter how
» bad your situation is. Then, 5-10 years from now when HM is available,
» you’ll switch to living hair.
»
so how much do you charge for this? :rotfl:


#7

Lol, I just became aware of this synthetic hair procedure several days ago. First thing I did was to search the web regarding synthetic hair transplant (which sounded like a bad idea to me, being a molecular biologist). Most of the critisim I’ve read about this procedure was concentrated, as AJ stated, at the issue of biocompatbility (or lack of). But the thing is that non of the criticism was targeted at the new hair fibers which are coated with collagen to reduce rejection.

» » AJ,
» »
» » The transplant is not permanent. The transplanted hairs are lost at a
» rate
» » of ~20% each year. The hair centers who use this procedure claim you
» need
» » to come every several months to add more hairs instead of those you
» lost.
» »
» » I’m not saying this is an ideal solution, yes you need to cut your real
» » hair every month so it will look the same length as the artificial
» hair,
» » but at least this could bring you back to NW1 already today, no matter
» how
» » bad your situation is. Then, 5-10 years from now when HM is available,
» » you’ll switch to living hair.
» »
» so how much do you charge for this? :rotfl:


#8

» Lol, I just became aware of this synthetic hair procedure several days ago.
» First thing I did was to search the web regarding synthetic hair transplant
» (which sounded like a bad idea to me, being a molecular biologist). Most of
» the critisim I’ve read about this procedure was concentrated, as AJ stated,
» at the issue of biocompatbility (or lack of). But the thing is that non of
» the criticism was targeted at the new hair fibers which are coated with
» collagen to reduce rejection.
»
»
»
»
»
» » » AJ,
» » »
» » » The transplant is not permanent. The transplanted hairs are lost at a
» » rate
» » » of ~20% each year. The hair centers who use this procedure claim you
» » need
» » » to come every several months to add more hairs instead of those you
» » lost.
» » »
» » » I’m not saying this is an ideal solution, yes you need to cut your
» real
» » » hair every month so it will look the same length as the artificial
» » hair,
» » » but at least this could bring you back to NW1 already today, no
» matter
» » how
» » » bad your situation is. Then, 5-10 years from now when HM is
» available,
» » » you’ll switch to living hair.
» » »
» » so how much do you charge for this? :rotfl:

Come on. Synthetic hair that never grows?? Thats the one and only downside that matters. I’d love to see a picture of fake hair. I can’t imagine its very convincing. If this worked well, US transplant docs would be at least trying to make some $$$ on it. They’re not. That tells me they don’t see it as commercially viable. Whether that is because of the price, or the look, or both, is irrelevant.
Unrelated, but you do realize that an NW1 is a 7 year old’s hair line, and tends to look quite strange on adult (white) men, right? If I could go back to any hairline I wanted, I’d want a mature, adult hairline, not a grade school hair line.


#9

» I’ve read that hair centers around the world recently started to transplant
» a new type of synthetic hair, which unlike the older type is coated with
» collagen that makes it biocompatible.
»
» I’ve heard that in combination with HT (for the hairline), this new
» synthetic technique can transfer any NW7 to NW1, already today…
»
» What are the downsides they are not telling ?

Isn’t that crap illegal ?


#10

You can see some results here:

http://www.biofibre.com/6-1indi.html

http://www.peeling.co.il/test/indexen1.html

» » Lol, I just became aware of this synthetic hair procedure several days
» ago.
» » First thing I did was to search the web regarding synthetic hair
» transplant
» » (which sounded like a bad idea to me, being a molecular biologist). Most
» of
» » the critisim I’ve read about this procedure was concentrated, as AJ
» stated,
» » at the issue of biocompatbility (or lack of). But the thing is that non
» of
» » the criticism was targeted at the new hair fibers which are coated with
» » collagen to reduce rejection.
» »
» »
» »
» »
» »
» » » » AJ,
» » » »
» » » » The transplant is not permanent. The transplanted hairs are lost at
» a
» » » rate
» » » » of ~20% each year. The hair centers who use this procedure claim
» you
» » » need
» » » » to come every several months to add more hairs instead of those you
» » » lost.
» » » »
» » » » I’m not saying this is an ideal solution, yes you need to cut your
» » real
» » » » hair every month so it will look the same length as the artificial
» » » hair,
» » » » but at least this could bring you back to NW1 already today, no
» » matter
» » » how
» » » » bad your situation is. Then, 5-10 years from now when HM is
» » available,
» » » » you’ll switch to living hair.
» » » »
» » » so how much do you charge for this? :rotfl:
»
» Come on. Synthetic hair that never grows?? Thats the one and only downside
» that matters. I’d love to see a picture of fake hair. I can’t imagine its
» very convincing. If this worked well, US transplant docs would be at least
» trying to make some $$$ on it. They’re not. That tells me they don’t see it
» as commercially viable. Whether that is because of the price, or the look,
» or both, is irrelevant.
» Unrelated, but you do realize that an NW1 is a 7 year old’s hair line, and
» tends to look quite strange on adult (white) men, right? If I could go back
» to any hairline I wanted, I’d want a mature, adult hairline, not a grade
» school hair line.


#11

It’s not FDA approved, but the protocol that was banned in 1984 uses a hair fiber that is not very biocompatible. The hair fiber that is used today is coated with collagen and has high biocompatibility. I just wonder if FDA approval is being persueted or is there still a big flaw in the procedure in terms of safety…

» » I’ve read that hair centers around the world recently started to
» transplant
» » a new type of synthetic hair, which unlike the older type is coated
» with
» » collagen that makes it biocompatible.
» »
» » I’ve heard that in combination with HT (for the hairline), this new
» » synthetic technique can transfer any NW7 to NW1, already today…
» »
» » What are the downsides they are not telling ?
»
» Isn’t that crap illegal ?


#12

So now you’re saying they are going to implant these things over and over again every few months for the rest of your life? I can’t imagine the permanent damage and trauma that it would do to your scalp by doing all that implanting constantly. Again, synthetic hair transplants are a very, very, very bad idea.


#13

» You can see some results here:
»
» http://www.biofibre.com/6-1indi.html
»
» http://www.peeling.co.il/test/indexen1.html

Nice, I will have done it tomorrow

http://www.biofibre.com/image/4-2phsuit.jpg


#14

» It’s not FDA approved, but the protocol that was banned in 1984 uses a hair
» fiber that is not very biocompatible. The hair fiber that is used today is
» coated with collagen and has high biocompatibility. I just wonder if FDA
» approval is being persueted or is there still a big flaw in the procedure
» in terms of safety…
»
» » » I’ve read that hair centers around the world recently started to
» » transplant
» » » a new type of synthetic hair, which unlike the older type is coated
» » with
» » » collagen that makes it biocompatible.
» » »
» » » I’ve heard that in combination with HT (for the hairline), this new
» » » synthetic technique can transfer any NW7 to NW1, already today…
» » »
» » » What are the downsides they are not telling ?
» »
» » Isn’t that crap illegal ?

I am, as well as my fellow members here, desperate for our hair back for obvious reasons, but I highly doubt any of us are desperate enough to take that route.

I can type a whole list of complications that can be associated with this ongoing procedure.

Btw, those photos mean nothing and look very suspect to the least. I love how none of them can be enlarged for close-up.


#15

» Unrelated, but you do realize that an NW1 is a 7 year old’s hair line, and
» tends to look quite strange on adult (white) men, right? If I could go back
» to any hairline I wanted, I’d want a mature, adult hairline, not a grade
» school hair line.

Ronald Regan had a NW1, no?


#16

Regarding complications, it seems the clincs that offer this procedure are aware of the problems that can arise, and even provide their cautions at their websites, for example:

"ImplantsThe Biofibre hair implant system (produced by Medicap s.r.l.) is a revolutionary artificial hair that is implanted into the scalp as a replacement for natural hair. The patented system is provided by several leading clinics around the world. Dr Hajduk and the staff at GHO clinic are specially trained and certified to provide the system.

Biofibre can make one look younger and permits an active, sporting lifestyle. The hair is an artificial substance that looks like natural hair. The implant give full hair thickness. It does not grow. The colour or wave of the hair cannot be changed. It can be washed and dried like normal fair, and must be washed specially under the maintenance requirements.

It can be done at once to give a full head of hair and natural hairline immediately, or can be done gradually depending on your preference. It can be combined with transplants and original hair.

Strict maintenance requirements: Biofibre has a strict maintenance program that must be followed, involving (i) careful cleaning of the scalp with special product every 1 to 2 days and (ii) check-up at a Biofibre clinic every 30-90 days (depending on patient). It is essential to follow the strict maintenance program in order to maintain the health of the implanted scalp. You should not undergo the treatment without being entirely sure you can do so. The maintenance is particularly important for men who, due to more sweating of the scalp than women, are more prone to infection if the maintenance is not carried out correctly.

Matched to your existing hair: Your implants will be matched to your existing hair. The hair is soft, flexible and fine with a diameter of 0.080mm. It comes in 13 standard colours, other available on request. Standard length is 15cm, longer on request. It comes in straight and 3 different types of wave or curl.

Pre-treatment test: A pre-implant test of 100 implants is carried out one month before treatment to test for sensitive reaction to the fibres. Clinical trials have shown 1% of patients to be sensitive to the fibre and therefore not suitable for the implants.

Implant of Biofibre: The fibre is implanted into the scalp with a special instrument. The strand ends with a reversible knot. The treatment does not involve pain, bandages or stitches and does not require time off work for healing. Can implant up to 600 fibres per day, so treatment can take several days. Treatment to cover the whole head may take 6,000-8,000 implants. Recovery of the skin after implant takes 2-3 days.

Removable: The fibre can be removed with a special instrument with no scars."

Take a look at this too, a peer reviewed paper on the subject from last year:

http://pt.wkhealth.com/pt/re/jcos/abstract.00134454-200812000-00014.htm;jsessionid=Ky9GNmK2HX9y8zqfZGvn54CljHTlLQLbh4h8ZQYMh0mcNWBfpKQk!-1104825961!181195629!8091!-1

» » It’s not FDA approved, but the protocol that was banned in 1984 uses a
» hair
» » fiber that is not very biocompatible. The hair fiber that is used today
» is
» » coated with collagen and has high biocompatibility. I just wonder if
» FDA
» » approval is being persueted or is there still a big flaw in the
» procedure
» » in terms of safety…
» »
» » » » I’ve read that hair centers around the world recently started to
» » » transplant
» » » » a new type of synthetic hair, which unlike the older type is coated
» » » with
» » » » collagen that makes it biocompatible.
» » » »
» » » » I’ve heard that in combination with HT (for the hairline), this new
» » » » synthetic technique can transfer any NW7 to NW1, already today…
» » » »
» » » » What are the downsides they are not telling ?
» » »
» » » Isn’t that crap illegal ?
»
» I am, as well as my fellow members here, desperate for our hair back for
» obvious reasons, but I highly doubt any of us are desperate enough to take
» that route.
»
» I can type a whole list of complications that can be associated with this
» ongoing procedure.
»
» Btw, those photos mean nothing and look very suspect to the least. I love
» how none of them can be enlarged for close-up.


#17

Since you don’t appear to want to listen to those warning you about this, you might as well go get it done. Let us know how it goes.


#18

AJ don’t be silly, if I didn’t want to listen I wouldn’t have come here.

But I’m not getting what I’m asking for, please show me information (peer reviewed articles, threads on forums, or whatever) that say that the current procedure (done in 2008/2009 using collagen coat) is still dangerous. I really want to see this info.

Again, I’m showing here a peer reviewed article from just a few months ago claiming the procedure is not a scam:

http://pt.wkhealth.com/pt/re/jcos/abstract.00134454-200812000-00014.htm;jsessionid=Ky9GNmK2HX9y8zqfZGvn54CljHTlLQLbh4h8ZQYMh0mcNWBfpKQk!-1104825961!181195629!8091!-1

It seems that many of you just made up your mind about this subject, but fail to provide information so I could too share your opinion.

» Since you don’t appear to want to listen to those warning you about this,
» you might as well go get it done. Let us know how it goes.


#19

I don’t know what else to tell you. People here have told you the problems, but you don’t seem to want to listen. I’ll say it one last time. If somebody is implanting hairs into your head, there is going to be scarring and trauma. If you do this repeatedly for many years, your scalp is going to be a mess. There isn’t going to be any study that says this. It’s common sense. I can’t find a study that says if you keep putting your hand in a fire, that it is going to burn. But it doesn’t take a genius (or a study) to figure that out. If you truly believe that you can keep implanting hairs over and over again into your head year after year without major trauma and scarring, well, then again, best of luck to you. Let us know how it goes.


#20

AJ, did you read the results of the study that I linked before (published on December 2008) ?, it followed 10 artificial fiber patients for 3 years, and your fears did not come true:

“Results: A total of 10 000 fibers were implanted with a mean of 1000 fibers per patient. With the exception of one patient, implantation was found to be safe, aesthetically pleasing, and psychologically rewarding to its recipients. Sebum deposition and temporary pitting at entry point of most fibers were universal. Recurrent mild folliculitis occurred in 30% of patients. Facial swelling, cellulitis, and severe scarring were absent. Annual fiber fall rate was 15-20%.”

» I don’t know what else to tell you. People here have told you the
» problems, but you don’t seem to want to listen. I’ll say it one last time.
» If somebody is implanting hairs into your head, there is going to be
» scarring and trauma. If you do this repeatedly for many years, your scalp
» is going to be a mess. There isn’t going to be any study that says this.
» It’s common sense. I can’t find a study that says if you keep putting your
» hand in a fire, that it is going to burn. But it doesn’t take a genius (or
» a study) to figure that out. If you truly believe that you can keep
» implanting hairs over and over again into your head year after year without
» major trauma and scarring, well, then again, best of luck to you. Let us
» know how it goes.