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Unihair


#1

News from Japan

http://www.ft.com/cms/s/0/f5d35f6a-eb63-11df-b482-00144feab49a.html?ftcamp=rss#axzz14mS9JUf9


#2

Can you copy the text please i dont wanna subscribe.

BTW Unihair is Aderans related ;-.)


#3

Unihair, formerly Aderans, is developing a cell-generation technique that it hopes will grow clumps of hair

Unihair of Japan, the world’s biggest wigmaker, is hoping for a big increase in sales through what might be regarded as the ultimate cutting-edge technology – a method to “grow” luxuriant displays of new hair on a person’s scalp.

The method uses cell-generation processes derived from pharmaceuticals research. “We see a tremendous number of possibilities [from the new process],” said Tadao Otsuki, Unihair’s chief executive. “It adds up to a fundamental shift in how the world can combat problems of baldness.”
EDITOR’S CHOICE
The last word: Wigmaker turns to youth in ad push - Jul-08
Japan’s new rules change face of AGMs - Jun-20
Pièces de résistance - May-05

With the help of the new techniques, based on ideas developed in the US and which are now undergoing clinical trials, Unihair is hoping to increase its annual sales roughly three-fold, from Y57.3bn ($706m) in the year to February 2010, to about Y150bn in 2017.

Mr Otsuki was installed in May as chief executive of Unihair – which until September was called Aderans – after an acrimonious struggle last year in which the activist US fund manager Steel Partners took control of the company and forced management changes as a way to boost shareholder returns.

Mr Otsuki was previously head of the Japanese operations of PepsiCo, the US beverages company, and has also worked for Kraft Foods, another US food and drink maker. “I want to bring some of the perspectives of the consumer goods industry into the hair loss sector,” Mr Otsuki said.

Unihair has found it difficult to lift sales and profits in recent years as demand for its wigs in Japan has started to dip, partly because men appear to be less worried about going bald.

Men have also started to experiment with other ways to counter the problem, for instance through conventional “hair transplant” procedures.

In such methods, doctors remove thin strips of skin from a patient’s scalp with healthy hair roots and then install these skin pieces in areas of hair loss.

The technique suffers from the drawback that there is no way to prompt more than one follicle to grow from a single root.

With Unihair’s alternative “cell-generation” technique, however, scientists take follicle samples from a person and use them to replicate new hair cells in a laboratory, before later injecting the greatly multiplied number of cells into the person’s scalp.

This procedure offers the promise of promulgating relatively bushy clumps of hair wherever people need them, Mr Otsuki claimed.

If the procedure can be shown to work effectively, he hopes that Unihair may be able to sell it on a global basis, reducing the company’s dependence on sales in Japan.

The only other company in the world regarded as having developed a similar cell-generation procedure for hair is Intercytex, a UK company owned by Regenerative Solutions, an investment group.

The price of a spell of treatment for a person using the new ideas would probably be set somewhat above the roughly $10,000 cost of conventional hair- loss treatments based on transplant methods.

The company registered a Y5.2bn operating loss in 2009-10, and expects another operating loss of Y3.9bn on sales of Y52bn in the current financial year, before returning to profit in 2012.

Unihair also hopes to increase sales by opening a new chain of shops to sell wigs and hair-loss treatments in China, while branching out more to sell wigs to women – not just in Japan but around the world. Out of the Y150bn sales for Unihair which Mr Otsuki is projecting for 2017, a third would come from outside Japan, he says.

Unihair says 400m people around the world – mainly men – have a problem with baldness. The total market for wigs, restoratives and medical treatments for combating this adds up to about $6bn a year, according to the company.


#4

» Unihair, formerly Aderans, is developing a cell-generation technique that
» it hopes will grow clumps of hair
»
» Unihair of Japan, the world’s biggest wigmaker, is hoping for a big
» increase in sales through what might be regarded as the ultimate
» cutting-edge technology – a method to “grow” luxuriant displays of new hair
» on a person’s scalp.
»
» The method uses cell-generation processes derived from pharmaceuticals
» research. “We see a tremendous number of possibilities [from the new
» process],” said Tadao Otsuki, Unihair’s chief executive. “It adds up to a
» fundamental shift in how the world can combat problems of baldness.”
» EDITOR’S CHOICE
» The last word: Wigmaker turns to youth in ad push - Jul-08
» Japan’s new rules change face of AGMs - Jun-20
» Pièces de résistance - May-05
»
» With the help of the new techniques, based on ideas developed in the US
» and which are now undergoing clinical trials, Unihair is hoping to increase
» its annual sales roughly three-fold, from Y57.3bn ($706m) in the year to
» February 2010, to about Y150bn in 2017.
»
» Mr Otsuki was installed in May as chief executive of Unihair – which until
» September was called Aderans – after an acrimonious struggle last year in
» which the activist US fund manager Steel Partners took control of the
» company and forced management changes as a way to boost shareholder
» returns.
»
» Mr Otsuki was previously head of the Japanese operations of PepsiCo, the
» US beverages company, and has also worked for Kraft Foods, another US food
» and drink maker. “I want to bring some of the perspectives of the consumer
» goods industry into the hair loss sector,” Mr Otsuki said.
»
» Unihair has found it difficult to lift sales and profits in recent years
» as demand for its wigs in Japan has started to dip, partly because men
» appear to be less worried about going bald.
»
» Men have also started to experiment with other ways to counter the
» problem, for instance through conventional “hair transplant” procedures.
»
» In such methods, doctors remove thin strips of skin from a patient’s scalp
» with healthy hair roots and then install these skin pieces in areas of hair
» loss.
»
» The technique suffers from the drawback that there is no way to prompt
» more than one follicle to grow from a single root.
»
» With Unihair’s alternative “cell-generation” technique, however,
» scientists take follicle samples from a person and use them to replicate
» new hair cells in a laboratory, before later injecting the greatly
» multiplied number of cells into the person’s scalp.
»
» This procedure offers the promise of promulgating relatively bushy clumps
» of hair wherever people need them, Mr Otsuki claimed.
»
» If the procedure can be shown to work effectively, he hopes that Unihair
» may be able to sell it on a global basis, reducing the company’s dependence
» on sales in Japan.
»
» The only other company in the world regarded as having developed a similar
» cell-generation procedure for hair is Intercytex, a UK company owned by
» Regenerative Solutions, an investment group.
»
» The price of a spell of treatment for a person using the new ideas would
» probably be set somewhat above the roughly $10,000 cost of conventional
» hair- loss treatments based on transplant methods.
»
» The company registered a Y5.2bn operating loss in 2009-10, and expects
» another operating loss of Y3.9bn on sales of Y52bn in the current financial
» year, before returning to profit in 2012.
»
» Unihair also hopes to increase sales by opening a new chain of shops to
» sell wigs and hair-loss treatments in China, while branching out more to
» sell wigs to women – not just in Japan but around the world. Out of the
» Y150bn sales for Unihair which Mr Otsuki is projecting for 2017, a third
» would come from outside Japan, he says.
»
» Unihair says 400m people around the world – mainly men – have a problem
» with baldness. The total market for wigs, restoratives and medical
» treatments for combating this adds up to about $6bn a year, according to
» the company.

This is actually outdated,due to the fact that it mentions Intercytex as competitors,as we all know they talked the talk,which amounted to a big nothing (As usual).

What date was this wrote?


#5

» This is actually outdated,due to the fact that it mentions Intercytex as
» competitors,as we all know they talked the talk,which amounted to a big
» nothing (As usual).
»
» What date was this wrote?

If I recall correctly however, Aderans changed their name from Aderans to Unihair AFTER Intercytex’s admittance of failure. So it can’t be thaaat old… maybe they just dont have their facts right?! But the article is nothing new anyhow.


#6

» » This is actually outdated,due to the fact that it mentions Intercytex as
» » competitors,as we all know they talked the talk,which amounted to a big
» » nothing (As usual).
» »
» » What date was this wrote?
»
» --------------
» If I recall correctly however, Aderans changed their name from Aderans to
» Unihair AFTER Intercytex’s admittance of failure. So it can’t be thaaat
» old… maybe they just dont have their facts right?! But the article is
» nothing new anyhow.

bla bla bla …

You should work on your short-term memory …

http://www.hairsite.com/hair-loss/board_entry-id-68512-page-3-category-1-order-last_answer-descasc-DESC.html


#7

Another useless post, in fact.


#8

» Another useless post, in fact.

Ok. Here is a real useful post by Albert Einstein:

http://www.hairsite.com/hair-loss/forum_entry-id-59058-page-0-order-last_answer-descasc-DESC-category-all.html

… and he got the attention from WeWillWin.


#9

» » Another useless post, in fact.
»
» Ok. Here is a real useful post by Albert Einstein:
»
» http://www.hairsite.com/hair-loss/forum_entry-id-59058-page-0-order-last_answer-descasc-DESC-category-all.html
»
» … and he got the attention from WeWillWin.

Thanks! I also think it’s useful, but kinda sick. Let’s see what happens.

Albert F.U.


#10

I’m sorry, but you guys are really, really dumb.

The date of the post is November 8th, 2010. That makes it one day old.

It does not say Intercytex is a competitor, it says Intercytex is the only other company in the world that ever worked on a similar technology (a true statement).

Finally, this is huge news. It means that the company is confident of a marketable procedure that is so efficacious, it will triple their revenue.

Thanks, mell. This was a very informative and exciting post!


#11

» I’m sorry, but you guys are really, really dumb.
»
» The date of the post is November 8th, 2010. That makes it one day old.
»
» It does not say Intercytex is a competitor, it says Intercytex is the only
» other company in the world that ever worked on a similar technology (a true
» statement).
»
» Finally, this is huge news. It means that the company is confident of a
» marketable procedure that is so efficacious, it will triple their revenue.
»
»
» Thanks, mell. This was a very informative and exciting post!

Nope, it’s a wrong statement.

ARI is currently in the phase where others already have been ~15 years ago.


http://www.wipo.int/pctdb/en/wo.jsp?WO=1998047471&IA=NL1998000129&DISPLAY=DESC


#12

»


» http://www.wipo.int/pctdb/en/wo.jsp?WO=1998047471&IA=NL1998000129&DISPLAY=DESC

That’s where ACell might help them.


#13

» » I’m sorry, but you guys are really, really dumb.
» »
» » The date of the post is November 8th, 2010. That makes it one day old.
» »
» » It does not say Intercytex is a competitor, it says Intercytex is the
» only
» » other company in the world that ever worked on a similar technology
» (a true
» » statement).
» »
» » Finally, this is huge news. It means that the company is confident of a
» » marketable procedure that is so efficacious, it will triple their
» revenue.
» »
» »
» » Thanks, mell. This was a very informative and exciting post!
»
» Nope, it’s a wrong statement.
»
» ARI is currently in the phase where others already have been ~15 years
» ago.
»


» http://www.wipo.int/pctdb/en/wo.jsp?WO=1998047471&IA=NL1998000129&DISPLAY=DESC

Really? 15 years ago companies were conducting Phase 2 trials?