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Topical use of turmeric essential oil


#1

As you know, Curcumin is TGF-beta inhibitor.
Has anyone tried topical use of turmeric essential oil ?
Does turmeric essential oil contain curcumin ?


#2

» As you know, Curcumin is TGF-beta inhibitor.
» Has anyone tried topical use of turmeric essential oil ?
» Does turmeric essential oil contain curcumin ?

if, and just if, whatever is in curcumin that inhibits tgf-beta (and is suppressive of androgen receptors and apparently inhibits alpha five reductase also), doesn’t get destroyed by the oil making (gotta heat it way up to do that) process (isoflavones are destroyed when you make oils out of soy for instance), there still might be that ‘yellow staining’ problem prevalent with curcumin. Could be ugly yellow stains on your head that would take a few days to get off…you’d have to try it though. Maybe none of this would be a problem and it would work like a charm. Androscience was testing a curcumoid based topical for acne and alopecia, they were supposed to be in phase two. I wonder how that is going.


#3

benji

Thanks for your information.

Turmeric essential oil is worth trying , I think as ever.

Some online shop seems to sell turmeric
as inhibitor of growing body hair.

Sooner or later , I will try using it.:wink:


#4

» benji
»
» Thanks for your information.
»
» Turmeric essential oil is worth trying , I think as ever.
»
» Some online shop seems to sell turmeric
» as inhibitor of growing body hair.
»
» Sooner or later , I will try using it.:wink:

Look at the scottish alopecia study - the herbs listed lower inflammation topically.

Regards
Pete


#5

»
» Objective
To investigate the efficacy of aromatherapy in the treatment of patients with alopecia areata.

Design
A randomized, double-blind, controlled trial of 7 months’ duration, with follow-up at 3 and 7 months.

Setting
Dermatology outpatient department.

Participants
Eighty-six patients diagnosed as having alopecia areata.

Intervention
Eighty-six patients were randomized into 2 groups. The active group massaged essential oils (thyme, rosemary, lavender, and cedarwood) in a mixture of carrier oils (jojoba and grapeseed) into their scalp daily. The control group used only carrier oils for their massage, also daily.

Main Outcome Measures
Treatment success was evaluated on sequential photographs by 2 dermatologists (I.C.H. and A.D.O.) independently. Similarly, the degree of improvement was measured by 2 methods: a 6-point scale and computerized analysis of traced areas of alopecia.

Results
Nineteen (44%) of 43 patients in the active group showed improvement compared with 6 (15%) of 41 patients in the control group (P=.008). An alopecia scale was applied by blinded observers on sequential photographs and was shown to be reproducible with good interobserver agreement (=0.84). The degree of improvement on photographic assessment was significant (P=.05). Demographic analysis showed that the 2 groups were well matched for prognostic factors.

Conclusions
The results show aromatherapy to be a safe and effective treatment for alopecia areata. Treatment with these essential oils was significantly more effective than treatment with the carrier oil alone (P=.008 for the primary outcome measure). We also successfully applied an evidence-based method to an alternative therapy.

» Look at the scottish alopecia study - the herbs listed lower inflammation
» topically.
»
»
»
»
» Regards
» Pete