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This goes out to the Game! - Need your input


#1

The Game,

I’ve been a long time follower of this site but up until recently I haven’t had the desire to participate.
Your postings have gained my interest. But I’m curious about a few things and have a couple questions. I believe you’re the man to ask.

  1. Given your sources, would you be able at this time to elaborate a bit on the procedure? More specifically, I curious as to the number of injections required. I don’t believe that since these cells are “modifying” the existing follicle that it will be necessary to locate each individual follicle. I’m no expert or scientist but common sense tells me that the injected cells will spread through the skin and be absorbed by all active follicles within a certain radius. So for example, given a certain area containing, lets say 1000 follicles, this area may only need a 100, 200, 500 or so injections of high concentration. Would this be a possible senario?
  2. Secondly, how certain are you of the permanence of this procedure? I understand that a number of sessions will be required and that is fine, especially if the price is within reason as you claim it will be. However, if the effects are temporary, maybe only a few years, it’s an option that may still be out of the price range for many. Has this issue been resolved?

Any help in addressing these issues will be appreciated.

Thanks,


#2

Givin’ props 2 da Game!!

MAD ups!


#3

» Givin’ props 2 da Game!!
»
» MAD ups!

:clap: To The Game!!!


#4

Lets look at the facts and use some deductive reasoning to formulate an answer.

Fact: The average result from phase 1 was 66 hairs per 100 injections. These injections were in close proximity.

So, if the injections are spread out, do you believe less injections would produce more hair? I think not. But phase II is testing this very scenario, with around 1000 injections over a larger area, so you will have your answer when the phase II results are published.

If the results were indeed temporary, and I’m not saying they are, would you be willing to spend ~$20000 initially, then $2000 every 3 years to maintain it?


#5

» The Game,
»
» I’ve been a long time follower of this site but up until recently I
» haven’t had the desire to participate.
» Your postings have gained my interest. But I’m curious about a few things
» and have a couple questions. I believe you’re the man to ask.
»
» 1. Given your sources, would you be able at this time to elaborate a bit
» on the procedure? More specifically, I curious as to the number of
» injections required. I don’t believe that since these cells are
» “modifying” the existing follicle that it will be necessary to locate each
» individual follicle. I’m no expert or scientist but common sense tells me
» that the injected cells will spread through the skin and be absorbed by
» all active follicles within a certain radius. So for example, given a
» certain area containing, lets say 1000 follicles, this area may only need
» a 100, 200, 500 or so injections of high concentration. Would this be a
» possible senario?
» 2. Secondly, how certain are you of the permanence of this procedure? I
» understand that a number of sessions will be required and that is fine,
» especially if the price is within reason as you claim it will be. However,
» if the effects are temporary, maybe only a few years, it’s an option that
» may still be out of the price range for many. Has this issue been
» resolved?
»
» Any help in addressing these issues will be appreciated.
»
» Thanks,

Hmmm well first, I don’t see why “TheGayMe” is concerned in his post with costs. Why doesn’t he just factor the cost with his up-coming sex change? Isn’t there some sort of discount? Hmm…I don’t get it. There has to be some kinda discount included with that “tuck” you’re getting, my little gay twin… Hey, just kidding, bro. I’m sure you do like to play Arnold sometimes like you said in the last post of yours, and maybe even tell your manly friends “IIII’m going to Pump claps hands You UP! Ah! AH!” But hey, you can’t help who you are, right. You’re my twin, right?..gay twin that is, but nothing wrong with that bro. I have always gotten the chicks, and you-ah, well, get the… the di.ks?

Anyway, to answer your question Casanova.

  1. The treatments needed are between 3-5, and if you get this done earlier, you would end up going back for more “touch-up” sessions as time goes on to make up for the thinning compared to someone who gets all 3-5 treatments and has been fairly bald(ing) for a while. Concentration is still being tested in phase II, but the level of concentration will be static once released, and not increased or decreased per person. Only the number of treatments vary, and that is based on the individual.

  2. The hair is a replica of your resistant hair, and will behave the same in its new environment. The cells are simply duplicates of the doner, which is the hair of the sides and back of the head, which thin slower with age as oppose to the sped up process the hair on top endures.

-The Game


#6

» » Givin’ props 2 da Game!!
» »
» » MAD ups!
»
» :clap: To The Game!!!

Kickin’ it wit’ Da GAAAAAAAAAME!


#7

Hey nathan,

how about frontal hair loss :slight_smile: has it been tested there yet ?


#8

» 1. The treatments needed are between 3-5, and if you get this done
» earlier, you would end up going back for more “touch-up” sessions as time
» goes on to make up for the thinning compared to someone who gets all 3-5
» treatments and has been fairly bald(ing) for a while. Concentration is
» still being tested in phase II, but the level of concentration will be
» static once released, and not increased or decreased per person. Only the
» number of treatments vary, and that is based on the individual.

Assuming your statements are somehow true, do you mean 3-5 treatments will be a regular basis from the moment you choose to have TRC, independantly of your norwood scale ? I guess not, however if a single treatment worth as much as 20Ke i don’t know who will be able to afford (or even try) that kind of uncertain treatment.

Additionnal question : do you work - or are related - to the MHRA ? Otherwise i don’t see how you could be aware of that kind of stuff.

cheers

ps : cheers to your twin too :stuck_out_tongue:


#9

» » The Game,
» »
» » I’ve been a long time follower of this site but up until recently I
» » haven’t had the desire to participate.
» » Your postings have gained my interest. But I’m curious about a few
» things
» » and have a couple questions. I believe you’re the man to ask.
» »
» » 1. Given your sources, would you be able at this time to elaborate a
» bit
» » on the procedure? More specifically, I curious as to the number of
» » injections required. I don’t believe that since these cells are
» » “modifying” the existing follicle that it will be necessary to locate
» each
» » individual follicle. I’m no expert or scientist but common sense tells
» me
» » that the injected cells will spread through the skin and be absorbed by
» » all active follicles within a certain radius. So for example, given a
» » certain area containing, lets say 1000 follicles, this area may only
» need
» » a 100, 200, 500 or so injections of high concentration. Would this be a
» » possible senario?
» » 2. Secondly, how certain are you of the permanence of this procedure? I
» » understand that a number of sessions will be required and that is fine,
» » especially if the price is within reason as you claim it will be.
» However,
» » if the effects are temporary, maybe only a few years, it’s an option
» that
» » may still be out of the price range for many. Has this issue been
» » resolved?
» »
» » Any help in addressing these issues will be appreciated.
» »
» » Thanks,
»
» Hmmm well first, I don’t see why “TheGayMe” is concerned in his post with
» costs. Why doesn’t he just factor the cost with his up-coming sex change?
» Isn’t there some sort of discount? Hmm…I don’t get it. There has to be
» some kinda discount included with that “tuck” you’re getting, my little
» gay twin… Hey, just kidding, bro. I’m sure you do like to play Arnold
» sometimes like you said in the last post of yours, and maybe even tell
» your manly friends “IIII’m going to Pump claps hands You UP! Ah! AH!”
» But hey, you can’t help who you are, right. You’re my twin, right?..gay
» twin that is, but nothing wrong with that bro. I have always gotten the
» chicks, and you-ah, well, get the… the di.ks?
»
» Anyway, to answer your question Casanova.
»
» 1. The treatments needed are between 3-5, and if you get this done
» earlier, you would end up going back for more “touch-up” sessions as time
» goes on to make up for the thinning compared to someone who gets all 3-5
» treatments and has been fairly bald(ing) for a while. Concentration is
» still being tested in phase II, but the level of concentration will be
» static once released, and not increased or decreased per person. Only the
» number of treatments vary, and that is based on the individual.
»
» 2. The hair is a replica of your resistant hair, and will behave the same
» in its new environment. The cells are simply duplicates of the doner,
» which is the hair of the sides and back of the head, which thin slower
» with age as oppose to the sped up process the hair on top endures.
»
» -The Game

The Game,

I appreciate your reply; thanks, and as for the negative comments - they’re not worth your time.

But my question was really centered around the ratio of hairs per injection which will most likely vary on a per patient basis, hence, another reason for repeat visits. What I’m assuming is that the number of injections required to fill an area will be fractional to the number of active cells within a give region. To barrow from my earlier example, take those 1000 follicles of which only 600 cells are active. To modify the majority of these active cells, what is the number of expected injections will be needed? This may be too specific to know with any certainty but all I think we need to know is that through some sort of diffusion, the injected cells will spread and be absorbed by nearing active cells. Then in time, other sessions will target the previously inactive cells.
Why is this worth knowing?

  1. At least, in the way I’m understanding things - Intercytex states that HT may still be required and that there will be several generations of HM. If the injected cells spread and modify active hair follicles, this may make it hard to control the hairline - what’s to stop hairs from sprouting out of the forehead or from producing a wavelike hair line? A few ways I’m thinking they could solve this, is by changing the dosage when treating the hairline - more injections, fewer concentrations or HT. What you’ve stated about HT not being needed and dosages says something different. Maybe it’s too soon, but more facts on the specifics of the procedure will help to better understand the procedure and its eventual success. Would you happen to have this factual information?

Again, thanks

Additionally, though I’m seeking factual information, all constructive comments are welcome.


#10

» » » The Game,
» » »
» » » I’ve been a long time follower of this site but up until recently I
» » » haven’t had the desire to participate.
» » » Your postings have gained my interest. But I’m curious about a few
» » things
» » » and have a couple questions. I believe you’re the man to ask.
» » »
» » » 1. Given your sources, would you be able at this time to elaborate a
» » bit
» » » on the procedure? More specifically, I curious as to the number of
» » » injections required. I don’t believe that since these cells are
» » » “modifying” the existing follicle that it will be necessary to locate
» » each
» » » individual follicle. I’m no expert or scientist but common sense
» tells
» » me
» » » that the injected cells will spread through the skin and be absorbed
» by
» » » all active follicles within a certain radius. So for example, given a
» » » certain area containing, lets say 1000 follicles, this area may only
» » need
» » » a 100, 200, 500 or so injections of high concentration. Would this be
» a
» » » possible senario?
» » » 2. Secondly, how certain are you of the permanence of this procedure?
» I
» » » understand that a number of sessions will be required and that is
» fine,
» » » especially if the price is within reason as you claim it will be.
» » However,
» » » if the effects are temporary, maybe only a few years, it’s an option
» » that
» » » may still be out of the price range for many. Has this issue been
» » » resolved?
» » »
» » » Any help in addressing these issues will be appreciated.
» » »
» » » Thanks,
» »
» » Hmmm well first, I don’t see why “TheGayMe” is concerned in his post
» with
» » costs. Why doesn’t he just factor the cost with his up-coming sex
» change?
» » Isn’t there some sort of discount? Hmm…I don’t get it. There has to be
» » some kinda discount included with that “tuck” you’re getting, my little
» » gay twin… Hey, just kidding, bro. I’m sure you do like to play Arnold
» » sometimes like you said in the last post of yours, and maybe even tell
» » your manly friends “IIII’m going to Pump claps hands You UP! Ah! AH!”
» » But hey, you can’t help who you are, right. You’re my twin,
» right?..gay
» » twin that is, but nothing wrong with that bro. I have always gotten the
» » chicks, and you-ah, well, get the… the di.ks?
» »
» » Anyway, to answer your question Casanova.
» »
» » 1. The treatments needed are between 3-5, and if you get this done
» » earlier, you would end up going back for more “touch-up” sessions as
» time
» » goes on to make up for the thinning compared to someone who gets all
» 3-5
» » treatments and has been fairly bald(ing) for a while. Concentration is
» » still being tested in phase II, but the level of concentration will be
» » static once released, and not increased or decreased per person. Only
» the
» » number of treatments vary, and that is based on the individual.
» »
» » 2. The hair is a replica of your resistant hair, and will behave the
» same
» » in its new environment. The cells are simply duplicates of the doner,
» » which is the hair of the sides and back of the head, which thin slower
» » with age as oppose to the sped up process the hair on top endures.
» »
» » -The Game
»
» The Game,
»
» I appreciate your reply; thanks, and as for the negative comments -
» they’re not worth your time.
»
» But my question was really centered around the ratio of hairs per
» injection which will most likely vary on a per patient basis, hence,
» another reason for repeat visits. What I’m assuming is that the number of
» injections required to fill an area will be fractional to the number of
» active cells within a give region. To barrow from my earlier example, take
» those 1000 follicles of which only 600 cells are active. To modify the
» majority of these active cells, what is the number of expected injections
» will be needed? This may be too specific to know with any certainty but
» all I think we need to know is that through some sort of diffusion, the
» injected cells will spread and be absorbed by nearing active cells. Then
» in time, other sessions will target the previously inactive cells.
» Why is this worth knowing?
» 1. At least, in the way I’m understanding things - Intercytex states that
» HT may still be required and that there will be several generations of HM.
» If the injected cells spread and modify active hair follicles, this may
» make it hard to control the hairline - what’s to stop hairs from sprouting
» out of the forehead or from producing a wavelike hair line? A few ways I’m
» thinking they could solve this, is by changing the dosage when treating
» the hairline - more injections, fewer concentrations or HT. What you’ve
» stated about HT not being needed and dosages says something different.
» Maybe it’s too soon, but more facts on the specifics of the procedure will
» help to better understand the procedure and its eventual success. Would you
» happen to have this factual information?
»
» Again, thanks
»
» Additionally, though I’m seeking factual information, all constructive
» comments are welcome.