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The importance of proper and extensive training in BHT


#1

Dear forum readers and fellow HT doctors,

I have listed the guidelines for proper use of BHT based on our experiences at http://www.hairsite.com/hair-loss/board_entry-id-17106.html

However, apart from those guidelines, there is a need among the physicians to respect BHT as being worthy of proper training.
Too often, doctors attend a workshop or two and decide that they are suitably adept at offering BHT.

Not only BHT, that happens with regular hair transplants too.

In the absence of proper training, the number of wrongly performed HTs, (including BHTs), will be overwhelmingly more than the correct ones. Leading to the concept that HTs (and BHTs) do not work.

Therefore, I will strongly recommend that any doctor or clinic wishing to enter the field must subject himself to extensive training with a successful BHT practitioner.
BHT requires proper techniques, proper instrumentation, the necessary physical skill and a thorough training.

Today, hair transplants are in a nascent stage. More so BHTs. Many techniques exist.
Some practitioners blame the inefficiency of their technique, on the nature of the hair.

Too often you may hear that fue is suitable only for small 500 graft sessions, or that hair from certain body donor areas are more prone to transection.

That is, atleast partly, a lie.

In truth, those that make such statements should qualify their monologues with the addendum that “the technique known to them is suitable for small sessions or massive transections”.

Till doctors take hair restoration as a field/speciality by itself, and subject themselves to proper training (as is done in all other fields of medicine), they will harm more patients than provide benefit to. That is not what we became doctors for.

Regards,
Dr. A


#2

» Too often, doctors attend a workshop or two and decide that they are
» suitably adept at offering BHT.
»
» Not only BHT, that happens with regular hair transplants too.
»
» In the absence of proper training, the number of wrongly performed HTs,
» (including BHTs), will be overwhelmingly more than the correct ones.
» Leading to the concept that HTs (and BHTs) do not work.
»
» Therefore, I will strongly recommend that any doctor or clinic wishing to
» enter the field must subject himself to extensive training with a
» successful BHT practitioner.
» BHT requires proper techniques, proper instrumentation, the necessary
» physical skill and a thorough training.

Thanks for sharing the info Dr. A. It helps potential BHT patients know hte pros and cons.

Does your clinic provide training for other HT docs? How long would the training be?


#3

Dr. A what do you think should happen when a clinic has already had problems with growth? Should they re-train? Then attempt to go back into the field?


#4

» Thanks for sharing the info Dr. A. It helps potential BHT patients know
» hte pros and cons.
»
» Does your clinic provide training for other HT docs? How long would the
» training be?

Dear Carrot,
Yes, we have a training program for doctors.
I usually take 1 doctor trainee an year.

Its my belief that doctors joining the field should spend atleast 1, preferably 2 years.

Regards,
Dr. A