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The best herbs for hair loss


#1

When deciding upon a natural approach to fighting hair loss, the following should be considered, in my opinion:

  1. Side effects. Nothing is worth risking your health for (e.g. libido, mental clarity).

  2. Feasibility. How much are the herbs going to cost you a month? A year?

  3. Effectiveness. Does the herb help to stabilize your hair loss? Regrow your hair?

  4. Compatibility. Will your hair regimen conflict with your present lifestyle or routine?


#2
  1. Side effects are rare. But too much can cause gas and bloating.

  2. Inexpensive.

  3. "Curcumin and TGF-beta, Hair Follicle killer. Competently named the “hair follicle killer”, transmuting growth agent beta 1, (tgf-b one) and its seemingly crucial part in hair loss has been arousing a good deal of attention in the scientific community latterly. What constitutes tgf-b1?? Tgf-b1 or tgf-beta 1 is part of a cytokine super-family on mammals that carries around thirty members. These dimeric proteins determine the proliferation and apoptosis (annihilation) on a lot of cell types and bear a fundamental function in the inflammation that’s connected with hair follicle miniaturisation, fibrosis, and its ultimate passing.

Several investigators have straightaway involved tgf-b1, and its localized results upon the hair follicles as the most important agent on androgenetic alopecia. So what could we do to neutralize tgf-beta ??

There are already at the least two hair loss treatments on evolution in the biotech industry that inhibit tgf-b1 as their main chemical mechanism of action. The trouble is you will have to wait a few years to acquire them.

Luckily, there are numerous natural chemical compounds that behave precisely like this, with a lot of side benefits as unlike side effects. A few are commonplace on dietings from several cultures, which bear a statistically relative low incidence of male pattern baldness. Below is an extract which yields a compact overview on Curcumin, a yellow spice commonly employed on Indian cuisine.

Curcumin, a.k.a. diferuloylmethane, is a photochemical found in the spice turmeric. It’s a powerful anti-inflammatory and antioxidant, and might help prevent the development of a variety of conditions related to oxidative and free-radical damage, including cataracts, heart disease, and cancer. In addition to apples and barley procyanidins and polyphenols, Curcumin the most auspicious new agent on the hair loss treatments brigade is a spice encountered in Indian food and table mustard. These Polyphenols from the yellow curry root (also known as turmeric, curcumin) are yet other “unidentified” hair loss remedy.

I question if anybody else is assuring you that Indian mustard is a likely hair growth promoter. It may sound a bit looney, till you take into account the science behind it. Because, turmeric the pigment that gifts mustard its brilliant yellow color, is the most efficient TGF-beta inhibitor recognized. Could mustard cure hair loss?

Have a look at these commentaries from investigators examining turmeric/curcumin and TGF-beta:rnrn2000 “Our results demonstrated that genistein and curcumin… Restrained the TGF-beta1-induced synthesis of fibronectin.” 2002 “Curcumin inhibits the formulation of ER downstream genes including… TGF-beta.” 2003 “moreover, curcumin inhibited the increments in… TGF-beta 1 expression…” 2004 “When applied thirty minutes prior to TGF-beta , curcumin dose dependently and dramatically reduced TGF-beta induced increases…” 2006 “curcumin significantly lessened mRNA expression of… the fibrogenic cytokine, TGFbeta.”"

  1. Taking one or two capsules shouldn’t interfere with one’s daily routine.

#3
  1. Side effects are rare. But green tea does contain some caffeine, so consuming a lot may, in fact, cause insomnia, nervousness, or irritability. And as a diuretic, green tea may flush away important vitamins and minerals if taken in high amounts over long periods.

  2. Inexpensive. Extracts with high concentrations of catechins and polyphenols can be purchased for a very reasonable price.

  3. "Green tea packs more health punch than most other drinks, but does it supply any ammo for the battle against hair loss? Amongst the many goodies in green tea are substances called polyphenol catechins. Evidence indicates that these polyphenols block the action of a specific enzyme that sparks male hair loss. As ever in hair loss studies nothing is straight forward — there are two types of this enzyme, cunningly named Type I and Type II. The Type II enzyme is the hair killing critter, yet a recent study showed that green tea only blocked the Type I enzyme:

The green tea catechins, (-)epigallocatechin-3-gallate and (-)epicatechin-3-gallate, but not (-)epicatechin and (-)epigallocatechin, are strong inhibitors of type 1 but not type 2 5 alpha-reductase.

Biochem Biophys Res Commun. 1995 Sep 25;214(3):833-8.

The polyphenols don’t block the type of enzyme more heavily involved in hair loss. So, sadly, green tea isn’t the hair loss supplement that many had hoped it would be. (Update: See the section below for good news about green tea) Nevertheless, inhibiting the Type I enzyme may help balance levels of male sex hormones. This in turn could have a small effect on minimising balding.

Don’t let this put you off drinking green tea, there are too many good reasons not to. Polyphenols are also souped up antioxidants, more potent than either vitamin C or E. They help protect against heart disease, cancer, rheumatoid arthritis and Alzheimer’s — although it is no panacea, it is excellent addition to beef up a healthy diet. Some may see this as irrelevant to hair loss, they couldn’t be more wrong — a healthier body ultimately means healthier hair. This is why I neck one or two cups of the stuff every day.

Update: Green Tea May Prevent Hair Loss
Until now there had been no direct research about the effect of green tea on hair loss, but a recent study revealed some tasty results. In the study mice with identical hair loss were selected and then split into two groups: group A received green tea in their drinking water, group B received only regular drinking water. The results showed that green tea halted hair loss in all of the test group and even triggered new hair growth in some of the mice. Significantly, some of the mice who were not invited to the tea party showed continued hair loss.

We observed hair regrowth among 33% of the mice that received green tea extract and did not observe any spontaneous remission or hair regrowth among the controls. Eight percent of these controls of showed progressive hair loss during the period of our study, whereas none of the mice who received polyphenoline extract showed any progressive hair loss.

Published 22 July 2005 in J Natl Med Assoc, 97(6): 816-8.

What might surprise a few people is the study concluded that green tea didn’t stop hair loss by blocking DHT, as many had originally speculated. Instead hair loss was prevented by the anti-inflammatory properties of green tea. Whereas blocking DHT is only of use to men, anti-inflammatories are beneficial to the hair loss of both men and women. So ladies, drink up too.

There is abundant evidence that polyphenolic sub-stances are considered as anti-inflammatory and have stress inhibitory characteristics, and there is evidence that stress inhibits hair growth.

Before you rush to put the kettle on you’ll need to temper your enthusiasm — quite how much green tea we’d need to drink to get similar levels the mice received, I don’t know exactly. The green tea water that the mice supped on had colossal concentrations of polyphenols. Of course, they would be drinking much less quantity, but then you have to consider we are relative monsters in size compared to mice. Unless you want to spend all day in the bathroom, trying to get equivalent levels of green tea just wouldn’t be practical, you’d need to guzzle down dozens of cups day to get alike amounts.

If you’re not adverse to pill popping then supplementation may fill the gap, with many brands of extracted green teas available in capsule form. The problem is the bulk of the research has been done with actual tea, the effects that concentrated polyphenols in supplements have on the body isn’t well documented. But there is a third option:

White is the New Green
There’s a lesser known tea available and it is not black or green. It is white. Whereas green tea comes from more matured parts of the tea plant, white tea is made from new growth buds and young leaves and is steamed and processed more quickly. As a result white tea has the most polyphenols of all types of tea — as much a three times the amount compared to green tea. So if you’re looking best bang for you buck with regards polyhpenol levels from natural sources, white tea is the top dog.

So, is it worth drinking green or white tea for hair loss still? Hell yeh. You will get one or two modest hair related perks, plus plenty of added health benefits. There is no real reason not to be drinking a cup or two a day. Just don’t expect any miracles — unless you’re small, white and furry and like cheese."

  1. One-a-day green tea extract capsules are also available, which I find to be quite convenient.

#4

» When deciding upon a natural approach to fighting hair loss, the following
» should be considered, in my opinion:
»
» 1. Side effects. Nothing is worth risking your health for (e.g. libido,
» mental clarity).
»
» 2. Feasibility. How much are the herbs going to cost you a month? A
» year?
»
» 3. Effectiveness. Does the herb help to stabilize your hair loss?
» Regrow your hair?
»
» 4. Compatibility. Will your hair regimen conflict with your present
» lifestyle or routine?

he then proceeds to list one by one The herbs in his own regimen as "the best"
LOL no bias there


#5

Posters may to add this list as they see fit.


#6

» he then proceeds to list one by one The herbs in his own regimen as “the
» best”
» LOL no bias there
or in other words The Natural didn’t ask Hangin for advice so Hangin has to find a reason to “diss” his post.

Get used to it Hangin. Your gig is up here.


#7

» » he then proceeds to list one by one The herbs in his own regimen as “the
» » best”
» » LOL no bias there
» or in other words The Natural didn’t ask Hangin for advice so Hangin has
» to find a reason to “diss” his post.
»
» Get used to it Hangin. Your gig is up here.

get used to it, you never had a gig here, thus your following me around like a puppy, begging for a treat, or hoping for some recognition by hanging on my coat tails

sadly for you, you are still a douchebag Kramer
by the way what is your regimen? baldie


#8
  1. Side effects are rare, but may include constipation and bloating when consumed in large quantities.

Another concern: Might consuming high levels of antioxidants such as apple or grape skin, or even vitamins A, C, and E for prolonged periods have a pro-oxidant effect, producing more free radicals, thus increasing one’s hair loss.

I read that the FDA suggests, “Americans consume 7000 ORAC daily.” These Applepoly capsules have over 20,000 ORAC.

  1. This herb can be rather expensive, especially the extract from Applepoly. There is another company, Asahi, that makes a less expensive extract, but the amount of polyphenols available is less as well.

  2. http://www.applepoly.com/procyanidin-b-2/


#9
  1. Pycnogenal may cause light acne in the scalp and forehead area.

  2. Pycnogenal’s cost could lowered by taking this herb once every three days, instead of everyday (which, depending upon the brand, can become quite expensive).

  3. “Pycnogenal and Glucose Control. A new study to be published in an upcoming edition of the journal of Diabetes Research and Clinical Practice reveals that French maritime pine tree extract known as Pycnogenol® (pic-noj-en-all) delays the uptake of glucose from a meal 190 times more than prescription medications, preventing the typical high-glucose peak in the blood stream after a meal. The study revealed the pine bark is more potent for suppressing carbohydrate absorption in diabetes than synthetic prescription alpha-glucosidase inhibitors such as Precose®.”

weblink:www.eurekalert.org/pub_releases/2007-02/mg-pdg020707.php

(And Jacob found this one: http://www.pycnogenol.com/industry/shop.php?country=north_america)

Why is this important? When we ingest sugar, our body (unless diabetic) will produce a substance called insulin for metabolism. The more sugar, the more insulin. Some doctors and this radical blogger named, “Carnivore,” have suggested that a person’s inability to tolerate high levels of insulin (insulin resistance) is a cause of hair loss:

"I believe that the testosterone/DHT theory is true. However, it is only part of the picture. I believe that high levels of insulin, and even worse insulin resistance are the core cause of this conversion locally in the scalp.

High levels of insulin significantly lower if not totally cut off two other hormones. Glucagon and Sex Hormone Binding Globulin. Glucagon is basically insulin’s adversary, also produced in the same part of the pancreas. Glucagon removes artherosclerotic plaques, lowers triglycerides and improves overall blood flow.

SHBG is the more important thing relating to hair loss though. Without it, testosterone is “free”, free to be converted into DHT or be used by the body for its other important uses. When SHBG is not in the blood stream in the quantities the body normally would require, I am of the opinion that allot of this excess free testosterone is then converted in the scalp to DHT. It has been shown that BOTH free T and DHT adversely affect hair follicles. More SHBG means much less free T.

People will come back at me with the fact that 1. many balding people are not actually insulin resistant. and 2. some insulin resistant people are not balding.

My responses would be 1. Some people are obviously less tolerant of high insulin levels than others and 2. this is where the genetic factor of baldness comes in. The androgens.

The people who are insulin resistant but are not balding lack the Alpha reductase and androgens to convert t to DHT locally. If you have elevated insulin levels, and DO have the capacity to convert T to DHT locally, you will bald.

This, I believe, is the connection between insulin resistance syndrome and male pattern baldness. Remember with insulin resistance you have astronomically high amounts of insulin in your system because you are eating a very high carbohydrate diet which would shoot your insulin levels up too high anyway, and your cells are to whatever degree resistant to its effects, so the pancreas has to produce more and more and more for the cells to utilize the blood glucose for energy.

Don’t believe what ANYONE tells you about low-carb/zero-carb. Here’s the list of “degenerative diseases” I have cured eating only meat, (yes, NO veggies at all):

Anxiety disorder
Depression
Insulin resistance/type II first stage
Reactive hypoglycemia/type II first stage
Overweight
Fatigue
Social anxiety
Memory loss
Overall appearance of aging
Circulatory problems.

I should mention that since going to eating only meat, and zero vegetation or grains, my blood flow is that of a brand new baby. I’m not kidding. For the last few years since developing my blood sugar problems and hair loss when I would lift my arms for even a few seconds they would begin losing feeling FAST.

I never remember that from when I was younger, and when I would sit on the toilet my legs would lose feeling within 1-2 minutes (not completely, but they would begin to fall asleep). Now? After a month of this way of eating I can lift my arms over my head to do over 10 min. of Tom’s advanced SE and I still have perfect blood flow to both of them. When I’m on the toilet I can sit there for what seems like forever and my legs don’t fall asleep at ALL.

Another thing that happens is, When you become diabetic, as I was at the first stage of diabetes, your nerves in your hands and feet will begin to die off. Mostly because of very restricted blood flow to these areas. The skin right at my toe nails on three of my toes, including the big toe, on my right foot had become black and dead. It was gross to look at and I didn’t make the correlation until I read up on diabetes complications.

Wouldn’t you know that since doing this all meat diet the skin in these areas has begun to regenerate itself and has color again!?!?! Not to mention I’ve had a blister, that I thought was just a callus, on that same foot that actually hurts now.

Our Paleolithic ancestors did NOT eat anything but meat. The so called “paleodiet” you see on websites is so wrong it’s ridiculous. Eating only lean meat and lots of veggies will kill you because fat is the most important nutrient your body needs. In fact, saturated fat, is the healthiest you can eat. Saturated fat will only cause problems if you’re eating high carb diets. Saturated fat CAN NOT oxidize in the blood because all of its bonds are occupied, so oxygen can not get in to oxidize the fatty acid. Fatty acids and cholesterol MUST oxidize before ANYTHING bad can happen. This process is eliminated when you stop eating carbs, and eat only meat."

  1. Since pycnogenal remains active in the body for 72 hours, it can conveniently be taken once every three days, and still be effective.

#10

nt


#11

http://www.alternet.org/healthwellness/92822/the_danger_of_meat-heavy_diets/

You may have seen recent news articles claiming that a study out of Israel found that the Atkins diet is more effective for losing weight and improving cholesterol levels than a low-fat diet. Unfortunately, the headlines completely misrepresented the study. First, the “low-fat” diet that was compared to the high-protein one in this study was a full 30 percent fat, which is not low-fat as the phrase is used by any of the top nutritionists and scientists who are effectively using low-fat diets to help people lose weight, keep it off and improve their health. Second, the study organizers encourage people to eat vegetarian protein sources, not the animal products encouraged by Atkins and South Beach. I don’t know about you, but it seems amiss to me for the media to portray this as a pro-Atkins study, since most of us consider Atkins to be meat-based. Shouldn’t the media help us to better understand the science? (By the way, the foundation of the guy who originated the Atkins Diet provided most of the funding for the study. That’s always a red flag for possibly biased science.)

Best-selling health writer and nutrition guru Dr. Dean Ornish wrote a good explanation for Newsweek on why the reporting on this study was really quite misleading; he does his usual excellent job of explaining what’s so, as he did in the foreword to his brilliant best-seller, Eat More, Weigh Less.

I am reminded of the fact that it’s been three years since Atkins Nutritionals filed for bankruptcy. And if your local grocery market is like mine, those once-omnipresent packaged foods with the “no-carb” labels are now harder and harder to find – with good reason, it seems to me.

While the South Beach Diet books and foods haven’t gone away, probably because it gets some things right (i.e., it recommends less meat and cutting out simple carbohydrates – both excellent pieces of advice), its popularity should wane as the scientific consensus grows that if you want to maintain a healthy weight and fight off disease, the best diet is a truly low-fat diet (more like 10 to 15 percent of calories from fat) based almost exclusively on whole grains, legumes, fruits and vegetables. The South Beach diet is certainly a big improvement on the standard American diet (rightly called SAD), but it’s a half-measure, as Ornish and others are teaching us. Indeed, if food industry statistics, celebrity interest and the success of books like Skinny Bitch and (OK, here’s a little self-promotion!) my own Quantum Wellness: A Practical and Spiritual Guide to Health and Happiness are any indication, there’s a growing shift toward healthy, plant-based diets, especially among people looking to lose weight and keep it off.

All of this is music to the ears of independent, qualified nutrition experts, who object to the “low-carb” diets. I’m not going to overload you with a tome of scientific evidence about why low-carb diets are bad for us. If you are looking for more in-depth information on the topic, I highly recommend checking out http://www.atkinsdietalert.org. Run by the Physicians Committee for Responsible Medicine, the Web site documents the health consequences of diets high in animal flesh, eggs and dairy, and lists the long history of grave concerns raised by medical experts, including an American Dietetic Association spokesperson calling Atkins “a nightmare diet.” The experts’ concerns are really basic common sense if you ask me, but sometimes common sense gets swept away by a combination of wishful thinking and impressive marketing. Basically, every reputable health agency knows that a mountain of evidence indicates that the saturated fat and cholesterol in animal flesh, eggs and milk clogs your arteries and increases your risk of heart disease, among an array of other problems.

Heart disease is of course just one meat-related health problem; eating animals also raises one’s risk of cancer. For example, a massive Harvard study in 2006 found that people who frequently eat skinless chicken (often touted as the “healthy” way to cook chicken) had a whopping 52 percent higher rate of bladder cancer. The evidence that animal protein is carcinogenic is strong, and people who eat lots of it are raising their risk. Diabetes and high blood pressure are also linked to meat-heavy diets, and vegetarian diets are far outpacing those that include meat on an array of health-related issues, as I’ve discussed previously.

Yet another reason low-carb diets are going through tough times is that people are realizing that these diets do not work over the long run. As with any unhealthy, severely limiting diets, you’ll lose weight over the short term (if you eat just grapefruit, you’ll also lose weight). But eventually the body objects to any unsound quick fix and the weight creeps back, as Dr. Ornish explains so eloquently.

So what is someone who wants to lose weight supposed to do? The answer is fairly simple: Switch to a diet made up of a diverse selection of foods: vegetables, whole grains (we should skip the refined carbs – South Beach gets that right), beans, chickpeas, nuts, fruit, lentils, etc. A wide array of evidence shows that vegans are less likely to be overweight or obese than meat-eaters are – because it’s not a diet, it’s a lifestyle transition. Because these foods are less calorie-dense and lower in fat than animal products, and because all plant foods contain zero cholesterol, eating that way allows us to shed weight in a sustainable way.

And a well-rounded vegan diet will provide us with a healthy mixture of complex carbs, protein and healthy fats, as well as vitamins, minerals and fiber. Because most nutrition advice is aimed at meat-eaters, it’s worth reading up a bit on how to maximize the health advantages of a vegan diet; I like the Optimal Vegan Nutrition Web page. And of course we shouldn’t think that our healthy new diet means giving up tasty food – Web sites and cookbooks with thousands of delicious vegan recipes abound. Eating should be a celebration – and we should do it joyfully, like the French and others in the Mediterranean do.


#12

"The neolithic era was when humans began consuming vegetation. This was the very beginning of the process that led to todays obesity and diabetes epidemic.

An all-meat diet does NOT induce long-term ketosis. For the first few weeks you will have excess ketones in your urine. This is because your body is in conversion mode. Your body is so used to burning sugar for fuel, it will struggle for a while to find its new fuel source, fat. After a few weeks your body will adjust to this new way of life and begin burning the ketones for fuel, so you will come out of ketosis. This is a normal and healthy condition.

You will feel horrible at first, because of this switch over process. But once you’re switched over, if you’re diligent, you will feel like a brand new person with the metabolism and energy of a 10 year old.

People will try to tell you that your body needs carbohydrates because your brain can only run on glucose. Certain parts of your brain can only run on glucose, true. However, what they fail to mention is that your body can convert both fat and protein into glucose through gluconeogenesis. As long as you are consuming enough calories, protein and fat you won’t lose muscle mass, and your brain will function perfectly.

That’s another thing they’ll try to stuff down your throat. They will tell you that protein catabolism speeds up on this diet. What they also fail to mention is that at the same time, protein synthesis ALSO speeds up. My belief is that the breaking down of protein is due to the de-junking of cells, something I read from a doctor a while back. The extra protein synthesis is due to the higher amount of protein in the diet (which is NOT dangerous by the way) and 1. the higher overall adrenaline amount (not adrenaline/cortisol flashes, this is totally different) and 2. the much higher human growth hormone in the blood. Yes, if you want a natural way to seriously boost HGH, an all meat, high fat diet is the way to do it.

High protein diets are not dangerous, and never have caused kidney or liver disease. The only time high protein diets are bad for your kidneys is if they are in conjunction with a high carbohydrate diet, through a process called glycation. The glycated proteins, because of the huge amount of insulin and glucose, are what damage your kidneys. This is the connection between diabetes and kidney disease.

I read of someone who has eaten nothing but unprocessed fatty meat for 47 years, and is still going. He’s built great muscle, started building the muscles at FIFTY FIVE, and people tell him all the time he looks like he’s in his 30’s when he is in his 60’s.

I believe we have all been lied to. I’ve never been a conspiracy theorist. However, after following the low-fat mantra twice in my life and watching my body basically implode on itself both times, I have experienced this lie first hand.

The very thing the diabetes association and heart association are telling you to eat to cure what ails you, is the very thing that will kill you if you follow it.

They are wrong. DEAD wrong. Anyone who tells you that zero carb or low-carb is dangerous, is seriously misinformed. How did the inuits or our paleo ancestors survive for all those millions of years on exclusively meat if it’s “so dangerous” for you?"


#13

» “The neolithic era was when humans began consuming vegetation. This was the
» very beginning of the process that led to todays obesity and diabetes
» epidemic.
»
» An all-meat diet does NOT induce long-term ketosis. For the first few
» weeks you will have excess ketones in your urine. This is because your body
» is in conversion mode. Your body is so used to burning sugar for fuel, it
» will struggle for a while to find its new fuel source, fat. After a few
» weeks your body will adjust to this new way of life and begin burning the
» ketones for fuel, so you will come out of ketosis. This is a normal and
» healthy condition.
»
» You will feel horrible at first, because of this switch over process. But
» once you’re switched over, if you’re diligent, you will feel like a brand
» new person with the metabolism and energy of a 10 year old.
»
» People will try to tell you that your body needs carbohydrates because
» your brain can only run on glucose. Certain parts of your brain can only
» run on glucose, true. However, what they fail to mention is that your body
» can convert both fat and protein into glucose through gluconeogenesis. As
» long as you are consuming enough calories, protein and fat you won’t lose
» muscle mass, and your brain will function perfectly.
»
» That’s another thing they’ll try to stuff down your throat. They will tell
» you that protein catabolism speeds up on this diet. What they also fail to
» mention is that at the same time, protein synthesis ALSO speeds up. My
» belief is that the breaking down of protein is due to the de-junking of
» cells, something I read from a doctor a while back. The extra protein
» synthesis is due to the higher amount of protein in the diet (which is NOT
» dangerous by the way) and 1. the higher overall adrenaline amount (not
» adrenaline/cortisol flashes, this is totally different) and 2. the much
» higher human growth hormone in the blood. Yes, if you want a natural way to
» seriously boost HGH, an all meat, high fat diet is the way to do it.
»
» High protein diets are not dangerous, and never have caused kidney or
» liver disease. The only time high protein diets are bad for your kidneys is
» if they are in conjunction with a high carbohydrate diet, through a process
» called glycation. The glycated proteins, because of the huge amount of
» insulin and glucose, are what damage your kidneys. This is the connection
» between diabetes and kidney disease.
»
» I read of someone who has eaten nothing but unprocessed fatty meat for 47
» years, and is still going. He’s built great muscle, started building the
» muscles at FIFTY FIVE, and people tell him all the time he looks like he’s
» in his 30’s when he is in his 60’s.
»
» I believe we have all been lied to. I’ve never been a conspiracy theorist.
» However, after following the low-fat mantra twice in my life and watching
» my body basically implode on itself both times, I have experienced this lie
» first hand.
»
» The very thing the diabetes association and heart association are telling
» you to eat to cure what ails you, is the very thing that will kill you if
» you follow it.
»
» They are wrong. DEAD wrong. Anyone who tells you that zero carb or
» low-carb is dangerous, is seriously misinformed. How did the inuits or our
» paleo ancestors survive for all those millions of years on exclusively meat
» if it’s “so dangerous” for you?”

ya they died in their 30s if they survived that long
wow that shows an all meat diet , just rocks


#14
  1. “Occasional use (three times a week) of licorice is healthy, but regular (daily), heavy use is discouraged,” states Dr. Ray Sahelian. “Too much licorice used for prolonged periods leads to loss of potassium in the urine and the retention of sodium.” I have also read that licorice raises one’s blood pressure.

  2. Licorice is inexpensive.

  3. Licorice is used extensively in traditional Indian medicine (Ayurdevic) for its anti-inflammatory properties: “…It promotes the growth of hair.” Apparently, this herb “alters the activities of certain hormones.” It is believed to interfere with the conversion of testosterone to DHT.

  4. Taking licorice two or three times a week shouldn’t be that hard to do. I enjoy the candy on occasion :smiley: .


#15

especially more than 30gms a day of animal protein is BAD for your hair
the uric acid that builds up in the blood, will make your hair rain like a waterfall

otherwise if your hair looks so great after your all meat diet, post pics and prove it


#16

» 1. “Occasional use (three times a week) of licorice is healthy, but regular
» (daily), heavy use is discouraged,” states Dr. Ray Sahelian. “Too much
» licorice used for prolonged periods leads to loss of potassium in the urine
» and the retention of sodium.” I have also read that licorice raises one’s
» blood pressure.
»
» 2. Licorice is inexpensive.
»
» 3. Licorice is used extensively in traditional Indian medicine (Ayurdevic)
» for its anti-inflammatory properties: “…It promotes the growth of hair.”
» Apparently, this herb “alters the activities of certain hormones.” It is
» believed to interfere with the conversion of testosterone to DHT.
»
» 4. Taking licorice two or three times a week shouldn’t be that hard to do.
» I enjoy the candy on occasion :smiley: .

snickers is known to be a DHT inhibitor
at about 50 cents each , they are a bargain, and tasty as well


#17
  1. Fenugreek has traditionally been considered safe and well tolerated. No adverse effects were not reported in any of the clinical trials using fenugreek (apart from occasional bloating).

  2. Fenugreek is inexpensive.

  3. “Preliminary study has suggested possible hypoglycemic (blood sugar lowering) and anti-hyperlipidemic properties of oral fenugreek seed powder.” It used in combination with other herbs to help support healthy insulin levels.

Further, in Europe, a mixture of Fenugreek and Saw Palmetto is sold as an herbal oral preparation for baldness. Fenugreek should be taken as a dietary supplement as well as applied topically: It is believed that Fenugreek stimulates blood circulation to hair follicles to promote hair growth similar to Rogaine. But “very little clinical studies have been done to support this claim.”

  1. Most brands of Fenugreek recommend only one or two capsules per day. Not bad. Topically, I read that you are to boil the fenugreek seeds and allow them to soak in coconut oil overnight. In the morning, sift the seeds out and apply (massage) the mixture to your scalp. But this may be too much of a hassle for some.

#18

» 1. Fenugreek has traditionally been considered safe and well tolerated. No
» adverse effects were not reported in any of the clinical trials using
» fenugreek (apart from occasional bloating).
»
» 2. Fenugreek is inexpensive.
»
» 3. “Preliminary study has suggested possible hypoglycemic (blood
» sugar lowering) and anti-hyperlipidemic properties of oral fenugreek seed
» powder.” It used in combination with other herbs to help support healthy
» insulin levels.
»
» Further, in Europe, a mixture of Fenugreek and Saw Palmetto is sold as an
» herbal oral preparation for baldness. Fenugreek should be taken as a
» dietary supplement as well as applied topically: It is believed that
» Fenugreek stimulates blood circulation to hair follicles to promote hair
» growth similar to Rogaine. But “very little clinical studies have been done
» to support this claim.”
»
» 4. Most brands of Fenugreek recommend only one or two capsules per day.
» Not bad. Topically, I read that you are to boil the fenugreek seeds and
» allow them to soak in coconut oil overnight. In the morning, sift the seeds
» out and apply (massage) the mixture to your scalp. But this may be too
» much of a hassle for some.

The natural promotes saw palmetto now


#19

Cayenne pepper at 3 to 4 grams a day along with a pill of soy isoflavones. The study that came out reported that 88 percent of the study participants had hair growth. Here are two studies, each one supports the other!

This study identifies some unique, rarely elucidated mechanisms by which capsaicin, a constituent of cayenne pepper, combined with soy, can stimulate hair growth.

  Growth Horm IGF Res. 2007 Jun 12; [Epub ahead of print] Administration of capsaicin and isoflavone promotes hair growth by increasing insulin-like growth factor-I production in mice and in humans with alopecia. Harada N, Okajima K, Arai M, Kurihara H, Nakagata N.

  Department of Translational Medical Science Research, Nagoya City University, Graduate School of Medical Sciences, Kawasumi 1, Mizuho-cho, Mizuho-ku, Nagoya 467-8601, Japan. 

  OBJECTIVE: Insulin-like growth factor-I (IGF-I) plays an important role in hair growth. Capsaicin activates vanilloid receptor-1, thereby increasing the release of calcitonin gene-related peptide (CGRP) from sensory neurons, and CGRP has been shown to increase IGF-I production. We recently reported that isoflavone, a phytoestrogen, increases production of CGRP by increasing its transcription in sensory neurons. These observations raise the possibility that administration of capsaicin and isoflavone might promote hair growth by increasing IGF-I production. In the present study, we examined this possibility in mice and humans with alopecia. DESIGN: Dermal IGF-I levels, immunohistochemical expression of IGF-I in the skin and hair regrowth were examined after capsaicin and isoflavone administration to wild-type (WT) mice and CGRP-knockout mice. Plasma levels of IGF-I and promotion of hair growth were evaluated in 48 volunteers with alopecia after administration of capsaicin and isoflavone for 5months. RESULTS: Subcutaneous administration of capsaicin significantly increased dermal IGF-I levels at 30min after administration in WT mice (p<0.01), but not in CGRP-knockout mice. Dermal levels of IGF-I were significantly higher in WT mice administered capsaicin and isoflavone for 4wks than in those administered capsaicin alone for 4wks (p<0.01) and in those administered neither of them (p<0.01). Immunohistochemical expression of IGF-I at dermal papillae in hair follicles was increased in WT mice administered capsaicin and isoflavone and in those administered capsaicin alone at 4wks. Hair regrowth was clearly more accelerated in WT mice administered capsaicin and isoflavone for 4wks than in those administered capsaicin alone for 4wks and in those administered neither of them. Plasma levels of IGF-I were significantly increased from baseline levels in 31 volunteers with alopecia at 5months after oral administration of capsaicin (6mg/day) and isoflavone (75mg/day) (p<0.01), while they were not increased in 17 volunteers with alopecia administered placebo. The number of volunteers with alopecia who showed promotion of hair growth at 5months after administration was significantly higher among volunteers administered capsaicin and isoflavone (20/31: 64.5%) than among those administered placebo (2/17: 11.8%) (p<0.01). CONCLUSIONS: These observations strongly suggested that combined administration of capsaicin and isoflavone might increase IGF-I production in hair follicles in the skin, thereby promoting hair growth. Such effects of capsaicin and isoflavone might be mediated by sensory neuron activation in the skin. 

  Note: "Twenty-five people with Androgenetic Alopecia were included in the volunteers with alopecia who were administered capsaicin and isoflavone in the present study and promotion of hair growth was observed in 88.0% of the 25 patients with AGA.

  The recommended amount of cayenne pepper would be 1-3 grams, and the recommended amount of soy would be 1 capsule of Super Absorbable Soy Isoflavones,(approximately doubling the amount of isoflavones used in this study) for those looking to replicate this study for personal use. Cayenne pepper is widely and inexpensively available at most nutrition stores.

Cayenne Pepper may be much more than a health promoting circulation enhancer and analgesic. Published studies strongly imply that it likely counteracts hair loss due to its effects on the endocannabinoid system.

  The endocannabinoid system refers to a group of neuromodulators (Kreitzer and Regehr, 2001; Maejima et al, 2001) and their receptors that are involved in a variety of physiological processes including appetite, pain-sensation, mood, memory and evidently hair loss. It is named for endocannabinoids, the endogenous lipids that bind cannabinoid receptors (the same receptors that mediate the psychoactive effects of cannibis). Broadly speaking, the endocannabinoid system refers to:

• The cannabinoid receptors CB1 and CB2, 2 G-protein coupled receptors primarily located in the central nervous system and periphery.

  It has been found that endocannabinoids inhibit hair growth, especially during periods of stress, via the CB1 receptor. The following study identifies that specific mechanism: 

  Inhibition of human hair follicle growth by endo- and exocannabinoids

  Andrea Telek, Tamás Bíró, Enik Bodó, Balázs I. Tóth, István Borbíró, George Kunos and Ralf Paus 


  Recent studies strongly suggest that the cannabinoid system is a key player in cell growth control. Since the organ-culture of human hair follicles (HF) offers an excellent, clinically relevant model for complex tissue interaction systems, we have asked whether the cannabinoid system plays a role in hair growth control. Here, we show that human scalp HF, intriguingly, are both targets and sources of endocannabinoids. Namely, the endocannabinoid N-arachidonoylethanolamide (anandamide, AEA) as well as the exocannabinnoid (9) -tetrahydrocannabinol dose-dependently inhibited hair shaft elongation and the proliferation of hair matrix keratinocytes, and induced intraepithelial apoptosis and premature HF regression (catagen).These effects were inhibited by a selective antagonist of cannabinoid receptor-1 (CB1). In contrast to CB2, CB1 was expressed in a hair cycle-dependent manner in the human HF epithelium. Since we successfully identified the presence of endocannabinoids in human HF, our data strongly suggest that human HF exploit a CB1-mediated endocannabinoid signaling system for negatively regulating their own growth. Clinically, CB1 agonists may therefore help to manage unwanted hair growth,while CB1 antagonists might counteract hair loss. Finally, human HF organ culture offers an instructive, physiologically relevant new research tool for dissecting "nonclassical" effects of endocannabinoids and their receptor-mediated signaling in general.—Telek, A., Bíró, T., Bodó, E., Tóth, B. I., Borbíró, I.Cayenne Pepper is the only natural CB1 blocker known and this mechanism may account for its apparent hair growth stimulation effects, especially when orally consumed with Soy Isoflavone extracts. Cayenne pepper has profoundly beneficial effects for certain types of heart disease and is considered curative for certain types of cancer.

  Editor's Comment: Cayenne would be indicated not only for androgenetic hair loss treatment in general, but particularly useful during periods of stress, due to the heightened activation of these receptors. The patented combination of Resveratrol /Curcumin also directly targets this type of stress induced, (termed neurogenic) hair loss. 

  Cayenne Pepper is available in any supermarket or health food store. 4/5 of a teaspoon, or 4 grams, orally consumed, would yield an equivalent amount used in the following Soy/Cayenne study.

#20

Thanks for info Rooster! I will put it under the heading Cayenne pepper.