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Study finds molecule triggers hair growth in mouse embryos


#1

http://med.stanford.edu/news_releases/2008/july/follicle.html

STANFORD, Calif. — Comb-overs might not be the only solution for those who are losing their hair. A molecule that prompts hair follicle development in utero might one day be used to treat hair loss or combat excess hair growth.

Scientists at the Stanford University School of Medicine used genetically engineered mouse embryos to demonstrate that the molecule, called laminin-511, signals embryonic stem cells in the skin to start growing hair. The signal may also prompt development of other organs, such as kidneys and limbs.

“Now we have a signal protein that can support the microenvironment for hair development, and maybe also for hair renewal,” said Jing Gao, MD, a postdoctoral scholar in epithelial biology. Gao is the lead author of a paper describing the finding published in the Aug. 1 issue of Genes & Development.

Early in mammalian development, laminin-511 sets up a conversation between stem cells in the two outer layers of the skin. The top layer, the epidermis, is separated by an intracellular space from the skin layer below, called the dermis. Laminin-511 helps bridge the gap between layers. The epidermis pumps out laminin-511, which crosses to the dermis and stimulates dermal cells to grow tiny, antennae-like projections that pick up epidermal signals.

“Laminin-511 acts at the crossroads between cell compartments, helping the cells communicate,” said senior author Peter Marinkovich, MD, associate professor of dermatology and a member of the Stanford Cancer Center. “It works through antennae called primary cilia.”

In addition to spurring formation of primary cilia, laminin-511 triggers a chain reaction of biological signals that travel back and forth between the dermis and the epidermis. The signals, which are sensed by the primary cilia, start hair follicles growing in the dermis.

Laminin-511 made hair grow at a specific stage of embryonic development in mice, equivalent to about the 8th month in human pregnancy, but the researchers are hopeful it might work later in life, too. They’d like to put their findings to work against hair loss.

“There are a lot of different causes of hair loss,” Marinkovich said. Further research will test whether any forms of hair loss are influenced by laminin-511, he said.

“Injecting laminin-511 into the skin might, under some circumstances, promote hair growth,” he added.

If laminin-511 triggers hair growth after birth, Marinkovich expects it would be easy to use as a drug. Because the molecule acts between skin layers, rather than inside a cell, it could simply be injected into the area of skin where hair was lacking.

Cancer chemotherapy patients might be good candidates for testing laminin-511’s ability to regenerate hair, Marinkovich said. Sonic hedgehog, a signal protein that the study showed was activated by laminin-511, has some ability to encourage hair regrowth in chemotherapy patients, a hint that laminin-511 might help reverse chemotherapy hair loss.

In addition, injecting antibodies against laminin-511 might block hair growth, providing a potential alternative to current treatments such as laser hair removal.

To deduce how hair follicles form, Gao compared skin from normal mouse embryos to skin from mouse embryos genetically engineered to be deficient in laminin-511. She observed changes in gene activity and skin structure as embryonic development progressed.

Gao also developed a new assay, soaking pieces of skin in baths of signal molecules to check which signals made hair grow. The new technique, which Marinkovich characterized as “elegant and simple,” has already garnered attention from other scientists who study hair growth. “The hair researchers were quite surprised with this assay,” Marinkovich said, noting Gao’s method is much easier than the genetic techniques typically used to examine skin development.

Gao and Marinkovich say their work has implications beyond explaining how hair follicles mature.

“Our finding that laminin-511 stimulates primary cilia formation was pretty surprising,” Gao said. Primary cilia, the cellular “antennae” she observed, also help drive formation of the kidneys, craniofacial structures and limbs.

At Stanford, Marinkovich and Gao collaborated with Mindy DeRouen, a doctoral student in dermatology; laboratory assistants Chih-Hsin Chen, MS, and Ngon Nguyen; Michael Nguyen, an undergraduate student, and Anthony Oro, MD, PhD, associate professor of dermatology and member of the Stanford Cancer Center. The team also included scientists at Harvard Medical School, Osaka University in Japan and Washington University School of Medicine in St. Louis. The research was supported by two grants from the National Institutes of Health.


#2

That’s sooo old!


#3

hi to all!new to the forum.
theres a company that sells laminin-511 www.biolamina.com
i was wondering if anyone has tried to fix something with it.it has some studies from a good university so i think it would be a good test trying it.
thanks


#4

» hi to all!new to the forum.
» theres a company that sells laminin-511 www.biolamina.com
» i was wondering if anyone has tried to fix something with it.it has some
» studies from a good university so i think it would be a good test trying
» it.
» thanks

Good find! Whether it can be used on humans safely is a an important question. It looks like it’s NOT for human use, at least they are not officially claiming it to be. It’s more for lab/mouse use only.


#5

we can ask the company about the kind of use to be sure.
also saw to this chemical company http://www.ecochem.dk/prod_uk_C.htm that it has laminin mouse , laminin human etc


#6

» we can ask the company about the kind of use to be sure.
» also saw to this chemical company http://www.ecochem.dk/prod_uk_C.htm
» that it has laminin mouse , laminin human etc

WE’re SAVED!!! no need to ask. Im having this done tomorrow.


#7

» » we can ask the company about the kind of use to be sure.
» » also saw to this chemical company http://www.ecochem.dk/prod_uk_C.htm
» » that it has laminin mouse , laminin human etc
»
» WE’re SAVED!!! no need to ask. Im having this done tomorrow.

I’m so excited, we’ve got so many cures these days … you know : Acell, laminin, that english guy who is finding another cure in a year, etc.


#8

well a cure drug that will completely cure hair loss will never be inveted.each one has different organisms thats why i believe that.but a more succesful drug than the others that already exchist will come out some time.i know that a lot of people have freaked out as i am too with the whole thing and the schientists but really accusing them hasnt got any base cause they are not obligated on finding us the cure.and as people still trying crap products with vitamins and the so called natural dht blockers and other stuff the only thing that is been succeded is to force the scam companies and new scam companies to produce their silly products.
HM eventually will cure hair loss in the very future cause its getting involved with the characteristics of each person.its really not helpfull for everyone of us this situation but we dont have any other choice than trying alone for now some homemade things.


#9

» I’m so excited, we’ve got so many cures these days … you know : Acell,
» laminin, that english guy who is finding another cure in a year, etc.

it remind me back in ye olden days, when people were proudly saying :

I’m so excited, we’ve got so many cures these days … you know : paste-with-the-names-cited-in-discussions-of-2000 b.c- …-1996 a.c-1997-1998-1999-2000-2001-2002-2003-2004-2005-2006-2007-2008, that gho guy who is finding another cure in a year, etc.

gee …! :smiley: