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Someone needs to contact Sanford Burnham


#1

I think that someone needs to contact S & B and try to get them to get the lead out. Maybe tell them that other companies are racing hair loss treatments to market. Describe treatments by other companies as if the other companies treatments are promising to try to make S & B maybe feel some pressure. Does this sound possible? We would need to contact their staff that is working directly with the new follicle technology. Maybe we could point out to them that they could legally market the technology in places other than America sooner - maybe real soon. Does this sound like it might help maybe get things rolling.


#2

I agree, I definitely think we need to talk with them to get a better idea of where they stand, but I do think they’re aware of all those things.


#3
  1. So how can we talk with them? What we need is their email address, I think. Unless you can think of a better way to get into a discussion with them.

  2. I totally agree with you that their treatment is the best chance we have. I get the impression that they’re new to the hair loss research effort. That’s what makes me think that they may be unaware of other hair loss research and we might be able to light a fire under them by talking-up other hair loss research, which could make them feel like they better do something with their new cell-based follicle technology. On the other hand, if we make them feel like other research teams are about to put out a treatment that could scare S & B off that could make them feel like there is no point in wasting resources on hair loss since a cure is imminent.

  3. I will say that I’m starting to have some hope that there might be some good things on the short-term horizon.

a) Piloscopy news could be coming by the end of the year and it could be good news.

b) SM04554 is wrapping up phase 2 in October, they are moving fast, and they have the world-renowned Wilma Bergfeld on staff. Their is also news spreading that they have recently added more study sites even though their phase 2 studies are nearing completion, which could mean that they’re gearing up for phase 3. Why would they go to phase 3 unless they are seeing positive developments in phase 2? And by the way if SM05445 works you should buy me a steak dinner because I’m the one who’s been pressing for frequent treatment with growth factors while you’ve been saying that idea is a no-go.

c) I don’t have much faith in Replicel but there is a tiny ray of hope coming from them. They’re rebooting and they’ve combined their technology with Sheseido’s technology, and Sheseido says they have some “exciting” news about the project but they have not said what the exciting news is.


#4

This will do nothing, unfortunately.

They are either secretly pursuing it or they are not.

random emails won’t change that.

Unfortunately, Replicel is much better at making 3D videos of little molecules floating around and hair follicles, than they are at actually making hair folicles

but what really pisses me off is this:

“Hello!
Thank you very much for your comment and your interest in our research. I am honored, but I am not doing the research, Dr. Terskikh is. If you’d like to make a donation to his research, you can do that here: https://supportus.sanfordburnham.org/sslpage.aspx?pid=298.
Have a great day!
Patrick Bartosch
Manager, Communications
Sanford-Burnham”

what exactly is “his research”. Somebody just offered them “several 100 thousand dollars” and they post a “donate here” link…

exactly how much money do they need to do “his research”… when does “his research” start? Where exactly is my money going and how much more money do they need to continue “his research”.

It looks like a useless donation if you ask me… a “black hole” of nothingness… give us your money and maybe in five years we’ll do some more research.

PUT A NUMBER OUT FOR WHAT YOU HAVE AND WHAT YOU NEED!!!

These people are either trying to be secretive or they are the worst fundraisers of the day


#5

These people are great at writing and raising money but not hair! I will say it again, if they really had a solution, money would not be an issue.


#6

They have a Facebook page: https://www.facebook.com/sanfordburnham?fref=ts


#7

S-B say that if everything goes according to plan with regards to funding, they’ll start clinical trials in two years. Upsetting.

link


#8

[quote][postedby]Originally Posted by Data[/postedby]
S-B say that if everything goes according to plan with regards to funding, they’ll start clinical trials in two years. Upsetting.

link[/quote]

hate to say I told you so, Rog

Well, they need $6.5M for everything. I think the record for crowdfunding is $25M give or take… so it’s not completely out of the realm of possibility… You’d have to guess they’ve gotten donations already… maybe $50k at best?

They should do an experiment.com

I’m a little confused about if that 2 years includes the fundraising… 2 years seems like a long time to plan a trial… that’s like 5,000 hours for one full-time person… assuming they have a team of 5, that’s 25,0000 hours of work… exactly how many hours does it take to plan a trial? I’d have guess around maybe 1,000 to plan

and starting a c corp takes literally 45 minutes online… maybe 10-15 hours of an accountant/corp lawyers time… if you need a legit entity


#9

What a waste of time. Before I said it would be at least 5 years but now I would say at least 7 years.


#10

Did you guys really expect something different?

I said it before - you could probably add up several years just in the “throwaway” time they will spend outside the trials alone.

Medical research for MPB is not some kind of Manhattan Project where an unlimited supply of manpower & money is furiously working 24/7 on every new development.


#11

[quote][postedby]Originally Posted by cal[/postedby]
Did you guys really expect something different?

I said it before - you could probably add up several years just in the “throwaway” time they will spend outside the trials alone.

Medical research for MPB is not some kind of Manhattan Project where an unlimited supply of manpower & money is furiously working 24/7 on every new development.[/quote]

we can only hope some chinese lab is stealing their idea…

lets just hope TPP trade agreement doesn’t pass… china is one of the few countries that doesn’t give a sh&t about IP laws… and if they start to care, say bye bye to bootleg SB follicles


#12

Why can’t these guys at S & B just be talked into allowing places like China to license it now and then we could just fly there and get it. There are also places in the Caribbean where it would probably be legal right now. Why can’t someone just sit down with the S & B team and explain this to them while also pointing out to S & B that the longer they wait the more they run the risk that someone else will come along with a cure and then S & B will lose all of the pent-up demand.

Let me explain:

There are two types of market demand for hair loss treatments. There is the pent-up demand and then there’s the continual demand. The research team that’s first to come out with a breakthrough treatment will get all of that pent-up demand, which is worth a staggering amount of money. After the pent-up demand is met there will be a smaller steady flow of customers on a routine basis but it will not compare to the income generated by meeting the pent-up demand that the first company to put out a breakthrough treatment will get.


#13

[quote][postedby]Originally Posted by jarjarbinx[/postedby]
Why can’t these guys at S & B just be talked into allowing places like China to license it now and then we could just fly there and get it. There are also places in the Caribbean where it would probably be legal right now. Why can’t someone just sit down with the S & B team and explain this to them while also pointing out to S & B that the longer they wait the more they run the risk that someone else will come along with a cure and then S & B will lose all of the pent-up demand.

Let me explain:

There are two types of market demand for hair loss treatments. There is the pent-up demand and then there’s the continual demand. The research team that’s first to come out with a breakthrough treatment will get all of that pent-up demand, which is worth a staggering amount of money. After the pent-up demand is met there will be a smaller steady flow of customers on a routine basis but it will not compare to the income generated by meeting the pent-up demand that the first company to put out a breakthrough treatment will get.[/quote]

JarJar,

Nobody is going to talk them into doing anything. I really wish we could but it’s probably a .000000001% chance of actually sparking a fire under them to do it.

That said, give it a try if you want.

Everyone knows they’ll make money. If you re-read the latest post, they’ve already filed a c-corporation, whereas before they were looking for partners. I’m sure they still need/want partners, but this c-corp move at least shows they’ve acknowledge they have a profitable opportunity. So you re-iterating that to them won’t help much.

Also, they are probably much more aware of where stem cell testing can happen than you-- because, after all, stem cell testing is what they do for a living. They already mentioned they need a 5 year test to see if it’s cancerous.

Lastly, these are semi-rocket scientists… I don’t think they need you to point out that somebody else may come and “steal” the opportunity that is present… they may even be semi-insulted you thought they weren’t aware of that.

Really the best thing you (or they) could do is start a crowdfund at experiment.com for $3.5M

I think there are a lot of people online who would give money to it… and I also think the press would pick up on it as well, and hopefully more people would donate.

3.5 isn’t even close to the highest crowdfund ever:


.


#14

I like your idea about crowdfunding for this. Normally I don’t think crowdfunding could work well for hair loss research, but for this, I think it could. The amount needed is pretty clear cut, the project is straightforward and easy for people to understand, and the incentive for people to donate is real.

However, not all crowdfund sites will accept medical projects, and even the ones that accept medical projects don’t accept ANY medical project. So that angle needs to be investigated a bit more.

Regarding studies on tumorigenicity, Dr. Bartosch didn’t say those would take 5 years, he said they would cost $5 million.


#15

Do you guys want to get this thing crowdfunded? Media attention?

Then start thinking bigger. Get the word out among the group of people whose struggles get sympathy & attention - women.

One balding woman is probably worth at least one man, maybe two, in terms of donating money. Whatever women lack in income is more than made up for with their access to the husband’s money. Not to mention their greater willingness to spend money to fix the problem than men.

And in terms of media attention/sympathy, one balding woman is probably worth at least 5 balding men.

There aren’t a lot of Norwood#6 women out there. But there some NW#3s, and quite a few with female patterns of overall thinning. I think the problem is that most of the world just doesn’t understand that this is the same biological process men suffer from. It’s normal for middle aged & older women to experience “age-related thinning” but I would bet money that at least half of what gets called that is really androgenic thinning over time.

If it was widely known that the same treatment to help men would also thicken up the thinning hair of 100 million middle aged/older women out there . . . They’d have this thing funded & rammed through FDA approval in a week.


#16

You’re right that there is vastly more sympathy for balding women (and bald cancer patients and burn victims, especially children) in the medical community, and especially among “institutional” types – the bureaucrats who control the purse strings of what research gets funded in the medical and academic communities. This is a bit different for private sector investors, but traditionally in medical research, academics in universities and public grant writers set the tone for what kind of research proposals get attention.

But I’m not sure that your average balding woman would be any more motivated to contribute than a balding guy. Both sexes would have about the same inclination to contribute, I think.

Anyway, I agree that crowdfunding is a great match for this project, assuming a medical crowdfunding site will accept the project. My understanding from doing some cursory research is that these sites have medical and scientific staffs which evaluate each proposed project, and if there’s any kind of “risk” factor associated with it, even a relatively slight one, they most likely reject it because of liability fears. In other words, they want projects that are “all upside, no downside” for them.

And by the way, I think there is virtually NO cancer risk with SB, but the consensus is that it still has to be tested to rule it out.


#17

[quote][postedby]Originally Posted by roger_that[/postedby]
You’re right that there is vastly more sympathy for balding women (and bald cancer patients and burn victims, especially children) in the medical community, and especially among “institutional” types – the bureaucrats who control the purse strings of what research gets funded in the medical and academic communities. This is a bit different for private sector investors, but traditionally in medical research, academics in universities and public grant writers set the tone for what kind of research proposals get attention.

But I’m not sure that your average balding woman would be any more motivated to contribute than a balding guy. Both sexes would have about the same inclination to contribute, I think.

Anyway, I agree that crowdfunding is a great match for this project, assuming a medical crowdfunding site will accept the project. My understanding from doing some cursory research is that these sites have medical and scientific staffs which evaluate each proposed project, and if there’s any kind of “risk” factor associated with it, even a relatively slight one, they most likely reject it because of liability fears. In other words, they want projects that are “all upside, no downside” for them.

And by the way, I think there is virtually NO cancer risk with SB, but the consensus is that it still has to be tested to rule it out.[/quote]

Otherwise, indiegogo.com may accept something like this… kickstart.com wont


#18

Yamanaka points out that creating individualized iPS stem cells would cost >$1 million per person and take 5-6 months


#19

Interestingly, it seems the comment about how much they need has been deleted from the SB blog…


#20

[quote][postedby]Originally Posted by needhairasap[/postedby]
Interestingly, it seems the comment about how much they need has been deleted from the SB blog…[/quote]

What are you thinking that this could mean?