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#1

RESEARCHERS WORKING at the forefront of stem cell technology may also unexpectedly have come up with a cure for baldness.

They almost miraculously changed one cell type into a completely different one, but in the process ended up with skin cells complete with working hair follicles.

A treatment for baldness was not the goal when they started tinkering with cells from the thymus, a small but critical organ that helps run the body’s immune system to fight disease.

Rather, they wanted to see how stem cells from the thymus would perform if transplanted into growing skin as a way to help burns victims.

The research teams from Switzerland and Scotland were more than surprised when they transplanted thymus cells into the skin of lab rats. They discovered that the cells forgot they were from the thymus and began performing just like healthy skin cells.

“These cells really change track, expressing different genes and becoming more potent,” said lead researcher Prof Yann Barrandon, head of the stem cell lab at the University of Lausanne and the local Polytechnique. Details of the team’s findings are published this morning in the journal Nature.

Being able to grow viable skin is a long-sought goal for doctors trying to treat burns patients, whether they come with hair follicles or not. Scientists have tried growing skin stem cells for transplantation, but the resultant tissues only last for a few weeks.

This new approach of changing one cell type into a completely different one seems to perform much better, with this new skin including follicles surviving for as long as a year.

The transformation of thymus cells into working skin cells is a startling result that has huge implications, suggests Prof Barrandon and his colleagues.

Importantly, this conversion process takes place without the need for genetic modification. The thymus stem cells seem to respond to the “local” environment, performing like skin cells because of their transplantation into the skin.

Their assumption is that these cells will readily change into other cell types in response to the environment into which they are placed.

“This operation could have theoretically been reproduced with other organs,” Prof Barrandon said. It works well with skin, but could also be used to produce other cell types, in the process contributing to the fields of organ transplantation and regeneration.

The findings will also force a rethink of our assumptions about biological processes. Before now researchers would have rejected the possibility that one cell type could transform into another.


#2

I’ve read something about rats, so interesting but nothing useful for our lifetime I guess


#3

» http://www.irishtimes.com/newspaper/ireland/2010/0819/1224277150771.html
»
»
»
» RESEARCHERS WORKING at the forefront of stem cell technology may also
» unexpectedly have come up with a cure for baldness.
»
» They almost miraculously changed one cell type into a completely different
» one, but in the process ended up with skin cells complete with working hair
» follicles.
»
» A treatment for baldness was not the goal when they started tinkering with
» cells from the thymus, a small but critical organ that helps run the body’s
» immune system to fight disease.
»
» Rather, they wanted to see how stem cells from the thymus would perform if
» transplanted into growing skin as a way to help burns victims.
»
» The research teams from Switzerland and Scotland were more than surprised
» when they transplanted thymus cells into the skin of lab rats. They
» discovered that the cells forgot they were from the thymus and began
» performing just like healthy skin cells.
»
» “These cells really change track, expressing different genes and becoming
» more potent,” said lead researcher Prof Yann Barrandon, head of the stem
» cell lab at the University of Lausanne and the local Polytechnique. Details
» of the team’s findings are published this morning in the journal Nature.
»
» Being able to grow viable skin is a long-sought goal for doctors trying to
» treat burns patients, whether they come with hair follicles or not.
» Scientists have tried growing skin stem cells for transplantation, but the
» resultant tissues only last for a few weeks.
»
» This new approach of changing one cell type into a completely different
» one seems to perform much better, with this new skin including follicles
» surviving for as long as a year.
»
» The transformation of thymus cells into working skin cells is a startling
» result that has huge implications, suggests Prof Barrandon and his
» colleagues.
»
» Importantly, this conversion process takes place without the need for
» genetic modification. The thymus stem cells seem to respond to the “local”
» environment, performing like skin cells because of their transplantation
» into the skin.
»
» Their assumption is that these cells will readily change into other cell
» types in response to the environment into which they are placed.
»
» “This operation could have theoretically been reproduced with other
» organs,” Prof Barrandon said. It works well with skin, but could also be
» used to produce other cell types, in the process contributing to the fields
» of organ transplantation and regeneration.
»
» The findings will also force a rethink of our assumptions about biological
» processes. Before now researchers would have rejected the possibility that
» one cell type could transform into another.

There is this :

http://www.actistem.com/

I dont have any faith in those pics, hence the product.

Thanks
Pete


#4

» » http://www.irishtimes.com/newspaper/ireland/2010/0819/1224277150771.html
»
» »
» »
» »
» » RESEARCHERS WORKING at the forefront of stem cell technology may also
» » unexpectedly have come up with a cure for baldness.
» »
» » They almost miraculously changed one cell type into a completely
» different
» » one, but in the process ended up with skin cells complete with working
» hair
» » follicles.
» »
» » A treatment for baldness was not the goal when they started tinkering
» with
» » cells from the thymus, a small but critical organ that helps run the
» body’s
» » immune system to fight disease.
» »
» » Rather, they wanted to see how stem cells from the thymus would perform
» if
» » transplanted into growing skin as a way to help burns victims.
» »
» » The research teams from Switzerland and Scotland were more than
» surprised
» » when they transplanted thymus cells into the skin of lab rats. They
» » discovered that the cells forgot they were from the thymus and began
» » performing just like healthy skin cells.
» »
» » “These cells really change track, expressing different genes and
» becoming
» » more potent,” said lead researcher Prof Yann Barrandon, head of the
» stem
» » cell lab at the University of Lausanne and the local Polytechnique.
» Details
» » of the team’s findings are published this morning in the journal
» Nature.
» »
» » Being able to grow viable skin is a long-sought goal for doctors trying
» to
» » treat burns patients, whether they come with hair follicles or not.
» » Scientists have tried growing skin stem cells for transplantation, but
» the
» » resultant tissues only last for a few weeks.
» »
» » This new approach of changing one cell type into a completely different
» » one seems to perform much better, with this new skin including
» follicles
» » surviving for as long as a year.
» »
» » The transformation of thymus cells into working skin cells is a
» startling
» » result that has huge implications, suggests Prof Barrandon and his
» » colleagues.
» »
» » Importantly, this conversion process takes place without the need for
» » genetic modification. The thymus stem cells seem to respond to the
» “local”
» » environment, performing like skin cells because of their
» transplantation
» » into the skin.
» »
» » Their assumption is that these cells will readily change into other
» cell
» » types in response to the environment into which they are placed.
» »
» » “This operation could have theoretically been reproduced with other
» » organs,” Prof Barrandon said. It works well with skin, but could also
» be
» » used to produce other cell types, in the process contributing to the
» fields
» » of organ transplantation and regeneration.
» »
» » The findings will also force a rethink of our assumptions about
» biological
» » processes. Before now researchers would have rejected the possibility
» that
» » one cell type could transform into another.
»
»
» There is this :
»
» http://www.actistem.com/
»
»
»
» I dont have any faith in those pics, hence the product.
»
»
»
» Thanks
» Pete

I have personally read this article more than once now but I am glad you brought it back up. The thing that pisses me off is that this will probably never be further researched (as Rassman pointed out, regardless if you don’t like him he’s probably right). I would add on to what Rassman had to say though, as it brings a good reason HM IMO isn’t coming to fruition as quickly as we would like. Think about it, how many times you hear of a breakthrough like this and it’s never pursued, rather fades away. The thing is what if this was the “Holy Grail” of hair regrowth. I am not saying it is but when all possibility are not investigated I think it makes it more difficult to find a “cure”. Like others have pointed out though company’s already working on their own version of HM aren’t going to bother picking up a new idea because it will hit their pocket books. Also new ideas would force HM company’s to rethink things, starting over is not an easy thing to do if they had too. IMHO If every single HM idea was looked into though I am sure we would be much further ahead, eliminating anything that could have been missed.

One last thing, Rassman said that the hairs grown only lasted around a year… well what if they scientist were able to find a simple way to make them last longer? Instead of worrying about how to grow hair, all they would need to work on is making it last.

All I am saying if all possibility’s aren’t investigated then they may have just passed up the “cure” without even being aware of it. As stated before though, more than likely as this was not the researches main goal they will probably not investigate it hence leaving one more prospect dead.

Opps, this should have been posted under baldlatino34’s original post. Not under Pete2’s actistem comment.


#5

I agree the subject is interesting.

But we’re still talking about lab rats. It’s more unusual when researchers find something that stops them from regrowing hair.