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Scientists identify gene that may explain hair loss


#1

I came across this article on Yahoo, what do you think?

Researchers in Japan have identified a gene that appears to determine cyclical hair loss in mice and believe it may also be responsible for hair loss, or alopecia, in people.

In a report published in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, the scientists described how they generated a line of mice that were lacking in the Sox21 gene.

“The mice started to lose their fur from postnatal day 11, beginning at the head and progressing toward the tail region of the back,” they wrote.

“Between day 20 and day 25, these mice eventually lost all of their body hair, including the whiskers. Intriguingly, new hair regrowth was initiated a few days later but was followed by renewed hair loss.”

The cyclical alopecia continued for more than two years and the researchers observed that the mutant mice had enlarged oil-secreting sebaceous glands around the hair follicle and a thickened layer of skin cells during periods of hair loss.

“The gene is likely involved with the differentiation of stem cells that form the outer layer of the hair shaft,” wrote the researchers, led by Yumiko Saga of the Division of Mammalian Development at the National Institute of Genetics in Mishima.

The scientists went on to examine human skin samples, where they found evidence of this same gene.

“We confirmed that Sox21 is also expressed in the hair shaft cuticle in humans … These results indicate that the Sox21 gene could be responsible for some hair loss conditions in humans,” the authors concluded.

http://news.yahoo.com/s/nm/20090525/sc_nm/us_hair_loss


#2

» I came across this article on Yahoo, what do you think?
»
»
»
» Researchers in Japan have identified a gene that appears to determine
» cyclical hair loss in mice and believe it may also be responsible for hair
» loss, or alopecia, in people.
»
» In a report published in the Proceedings of the National Academy of
» Sciences, the scientists described how they generated a line of mice that
» were lacking in the Sox21 gene.
»
» “The mice started to lose their fur from postnatal day 11, beginning at
» the head and progressing toward the tail region of the back,” they wrote.
»
» “Between day 20 and day 25, these mice eventually lost all of their body
» hair, including the whiskers. Intriguingly, new hair regrowth was initiated
» a few days later but was followed by renewed hair loss.”
»
» The cyclical alopecia continued for more than two years and the
» researchers observed that the mutant mice had enlarged oil-secreting
» sebaceous glands around the hair follicle and a thickened layer of skin
» cells during periods of hair loss.
»
» “The gene is likely involved with the differentiation of stem cells that
» form the outer layer of the hair shaft,” wrote the researchers, led by
» Yumiko Saga of the Division of Mammalian Development at the National
» Institute of Genetics in Mishima.
»
» The scientists went on to examine human skin samples, where they found
» evidence of this same gene.
»
» “We confirmed that Sox21 is also expressed in the hair shaft cuticle in
» humans … These results indicate that the Sox21 gene could be responsible
» for some hair loss conditions in humans,” the authors concluded.
»
» http://news.yahoo.com/s/nm/20090525/sc_nm/us_hair_loss

Interesting - particularly the bit about enlarged sebaceous glad and skin layer bit. May be more relevant to AA, though.


#3

9 out of 10 that doesn’t apply to humans


#4

Hair gene cure for hair loss?


#5

» 9 out of 10 that doesn’t apply to humans

9 out of 10 it does apply to humans

“Already, the first human skin sample study has revealed the existence of a similar gene in people. Now, it’s just a matter of time until that gene is found, the experts say.”

mice gene phenotypes and gene expressions are very similar to that of humans… there almost always is a correlation.


#6

mice genes are very identtical to that of human genes. mice are prize models to test drugs for humans.

This is a magnificent find by scientists. This is “real”.

» » 9 out of 10 that doesn’t apply to humans
»
» 9 out of 10 it does apply to humans
»
» “Already, the first human skin sample study has revealed the existence of
» a similar gene in people. Now, it’s just a matter of time until that gene
» is found, the experts say.”
»
» mice gene phenotypes and gene expressions are very similar to that of
» humans… there almost always is a correlation.


#7

Very exciting, will be interesting to see if anything comes of this.


#8

Correct me if I’m wrong and don’t attack me if I am, but didn’t they already find the gene that causes male pattern baldness?? If they have, is Japan up to date on this? Or, better yet, what is the date of this publication,Leo2??

On a side note, would some agree with me that gene therapy for MPB may be closer than hair multiplication to reality? Once gene therapy is mastered then life on Earth will never be the same. With gene therapy you have an abundance of universities, clinics, top doctors, labs, and probably with what seems like an unlimmited amount of fundings from across the globe working on how to make it a reality for the public. Then you have Hair Multiplication where the only number of people working on it are probably below 5 and with what seems like financial difficulties. Not to mention, hair multiplication is only of significant importance to us suffering mpb and the rest could care less.

» I came across this article on Yahoo, what do you think?
»
»
»
» Researchers in Japan have identified a gene that appears to determine
» cyclical hair loss in mice and believe it may also be responsible for hair
» loss, or alopecia, in people.
»
» In a report published in the Proceedings of the National Academy of
» Sciences, the scientists described how they generated a line of mice that
» were lacking in the Sox21 gene.
»
» “The mice started to lose their fur from postnatal day 11, beginning at
» the head and progressing toward the tail region of the back,” they wrote.
»
» “Between day 20 and day 25, these mice eventually lost all of their body
» hair, including the whiskers. Intriguingly, new hair regrowth was initiated
» a few days later but was followed by renewed hair loss.”
»
» The cyclical alopecia continued for more than two years and the
» researchers observed that the mutant mice had enlarged oil-secreting
» sebaceous glands around the hair follicle and a thickened layer of skin
» cells during periods of hair loss.
»
» “The gene is likely involved with the differentiation of stem cells that
» form the outer layer of the hair shaft,” wrote the researchers, led by
» Yumiko Saga of the Division of Mammalian Development at the National
» Institute of Genetics in Mishima.
»
» The scientists went on to examine human skin samples, where they found
» evidence of this same gene.
»
» “We confirmed that Sox21 is also expressed in the hair shaft cuticle in
» humans … These results indicate that the Sox21 gene could be responsible
» for some hair loss conditions in humans,” the authors concluded.
»
» http://news.yahoo.com/s/nm/20090525/sc_nm/us_hair_loss


#9

The article came out this month (May of '09). Imagine if this does lead to a “cure”. That would mean getting rid of Propecia and its side effects. :slight_smile:


#10

i also thought that they have identified the gene that causes hairloss, i ve heard it before from another research group not the one mentioned above…how many genes are there lol


#11

» Correct me if I’m wrong and don’t attack me if I am, but didn’t they
» already find the gene that causes male pattern baldness?? If they have, is
» Japan up to date on this? Or, better yet, what is the date of this
» publication,Leo2??
»
»
» On a side note, would some agree with me that gene therapy for MPB may be
» closer than hair multiplication to reality? Once gene therapy is mastered
» then life on Earth will never be the same. With gene therapy you have an
» abundance of universities, clinics, top doctors, labs, and probably with
» what seems like an unlimmited amount of fundings from across the globe
» working on how to make it a reality for the public. Then you have Hair
» Multiplication where the only number of people working on it are probably
» below 5 and with what seems like financial difficulties. Not to mention,
» hair multiplication is only of significant importance to us suffering mpb
» and the rest could care less.
»
»
» » I came across this article on Yahoo, what do you think?
» »
» »
» »
» » Researchers in Japan have identified a gene that appears to determine
» » cyclical hair loss in mice and believe it may also be responsible for
» hair
» » loss, or alopecia, in people.
» »
» » In a report published in the Proceedings of the National Academy of
» » Sciences, the scientists described how they generated a line of mice
» that
» » were lacking in the Sox21 gene.
» »
» » “The mice started to lose their fur from postnatal day 11, beginning at
» » the head and progressing toward the tail region of the back,” they
» wrote.
» »
» » “Between day 20 and day 25, these mice eventually lost all of their
» body
» » hair, including the whiskers. Intriguingly, new hair regrowth was
» initiated
» » a few days later but was followed by renewed hair loss.”
» »
» » The cyclical alopecia continued for more than two years and the
» » researchers observed that the mutant mice had enlarged oil-secreting
» » sebaceous glands around the hair follicle and a thickened layer of skin
» » cells during periods of hair loss.
» »
» » “The gene is likely involved with the differentiation of stem cells
» that
» » form the outer layer of the hair shaft,” wrote the researchers, led by
» » Yumiko Saga of the Division of Mammalian Development at the National
» » Institute of Genetics in Mishima.
» »
» » The scientists went on to examine human skin samples, where they found
» » evidence of this same gene.
» »
» » “We confirmed that Sox21 is also expressed in the hair shaft cuticle in
» » humans … These results indicate that the Sox21 gene could be
» responsible
» » for some hair loss conditions in humans,” the authors concluded.
» »
» » http://news.yahoo.com/s/nm/20090525/sc_nm/us_hair_loss

Couldn’t disagree more that gene therapy is closer than any sort of multiplication. Gene therapy is years and years away. Decades. It’s potentially dangerous.
Beyond that, nothing in this article seems to suggest that the “hair loss” they’re talking about is MPB. My guess is that its alopecia areata, which if true, would be great. 7 year olds should not go bald, so if those people can be helped, that would be great. I’ve always read that there was definitely more than one gene in play with MPB, so a single gene causing hairloss is probably not MPB.


#12

Yes the genes were located prior to Japan’s discovery (but something tells me it’s not the same discovery; i.e. MPB vs alopecia areta). The discovery below DOES infact indicate that the genes to MALE PATTERN BALDNESS were discovered. Not Alopecia Areta-which is excellent news.

Now the question is whether or not this will benefit only those who have YET to be affected by MPB (early treatment/therapy,) or as well as those in their later stages of MPB (thats us guys). Took about 12 years to find the gene (cause), how much more time before therapy is in place for the public is the next big question.

Baldness Gene Discovered: 1 In 7 Men At Risk

ScienceDaily (Oct. 13, 2008) — Researchers at McGill University, King’s College London and GlaxoSmithKline Inc. have identified two genetic variants in Caucasians that together produce an astounding sevenfold increase the risk of male pattern baldness.

About a third of all men are affected by male pattern baldness by age 45. The condition’s social and economic impact is considerable: expenditures for hair transplantation in the United States alone exceeded $115 million (U.S.) in 2007, while global revenues for medical therapy for male-pattern baldness recently surpassed $405 million. Male pattern baldness is the most common form of baldness, where hair is lost in a well-defined pattern beginning above both temples, and results in a distinctive M-shaped hairline. Estimates suggest more than 80 per cent of cases are hereditary.

This study was conducted by Dr. Vincent Mooser of GlaxoSmithKline, Dr. Brent Richards of McGill University’s Faculty of Medicine and the affiliated Jewish General Hospital (and formerly of King’s College), and Dr. Tim Spector of King’s College. Along with colleagues in Iceland, Switzerland and the Netherlands, the researchers conducted a genome-wide association study of 1,125 Caucasian men who had been assessed for male pattern baldness. They found two previously unknown genetic variants on chromosome 20 that substantially increased the risk of male pattern baldness. They then confirmed these findings in an additional 1,650 Caucasian men.

“I would presume male pattern baldness is caused by the same genetic variation in non-caucasians,” said Richards, an assistant professor in genetic epidemiology, “but we haven’t studied those populations, so we can’t say for certain.”

Though the researchers consider their discovery to be a scientific breakthrough, they caution that it does not mean a treatment or cure for male pattern baldness is imminent.

“We’ve only identified a cause,” Richards said. “Treating male pattern baldness will require more research. But, of course, the first step in finding a way to treat most conditions it is to first identify the cause.”

“Early prediction before hair loss starts may lead to some interesting therapies that are more effective than treating late stage hair loss,” added Spector, of King’s College and director of the TwinsUK cohort study.

Researchers have long been aware of a genetic variant on the X chromosome that was linked to male pattern baldness, Richards said.

“That’s where the idea that baldness is inherited from the mother’s side of the family comes from,” he explained. “However it’s been long recognized that that there must be several genes causing male pattern baldness. Until now, no one could identify those other genes. If you have both the risk variants we discovered on chromosome 20 and the unrelated known variant on the X chromosome, your risk of becoming bald increases sevenfold.”

“What’s startling is that one in seven men have both of those risk variants. That’s 14 per cent of the total population!”

Source: Science Daily http://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2008/10/081012164437.htm


#13

» The article came out this month (May of '09). Imagine if this does lead to
» a “cure”. That would mean getting rid of Propecia and its side effects. :slight_smile:

Do you suffer from side effects Muscleboy? Have you tried lowering your dosage??


#14

» Yes the genes were located prior to Japan’s discovery (but something tells
» me it’s not the same discovery; i.e. MPB vs alopecia areta). The discovery
» below DOES infact indicate that the genes to MALE PATTERN BALDNESS were
» discovered. Not Alopecia Areta-which is excellent news.
»
» Now the question is whether or not this will benefit only those who have
» YET to be affected by MPB (early treatment/therapy,) or as well as those in
» their later stages of MPB (thats us guys). Took about 12 years to find the
» gene (cause), how much more time before therapy is in place for the public
» is the next big question.
»
» Baldness Gene Discovered: 1 In 7 Men At Risk
»
» ScienceDaily (Oct. 13, 2008) — Researchers at McGill University, King’s
» College London and GlaxoSmithKline Inc. have identified two genetic
» variants in Caucasians that together produce an astounding sevenfold
» increase the risk of male pattern baldness.
»
» About a third of all men are affected by male pattern baldness by age 45.
» The condition’s social and economic impact is considerable: expenditures
» for hair transplantation in the United States alone exceeded $115 million
» (U.S.) in 2007, while global revenues for medical therapy for male-pattern
» baldness recently surpassed $405 million. Male pattern baldness is the most
» common form of baldness, where hair is lost in a well-defined pattern
» beginning above both temples, and results in a distinctive M-shaped
» hairline. Estimates suggest more than 80 per cent of cases are hereditary.
»
» This study was conducted by Dr. Vincent Mooser of GlaxoSmithKline, Dr.
» Brent Richards of McGill University’s Faculty of Medicine and the
» affiliated Jewish General Hospital (and formerly of King’s College), and
» Dr. Tim Spector of King’s College. Along with colleagues in Iceland,
» Switzerland and the Netherlands, the researchers conducted a genome-wide
» association study of 1,125 Caucasian men who had been assessed for male
» pattern baldness. They found two previously unknown genetic variants on
» chromosome 20 that substantially increased the risk of male pattern
» baldness. They then confirmed these findings in an additional 1,650
» Caucasian men.
»
» “I would presume male pattern baldness is caused by the same genetic
» variation in non-caucasians,” said Richards, an assistant professor in
» genetic epidemiology, “but we haven’t studied those populations, so we
» can’t say for certain.”
»
» Though the researchers consider their discovery to be a scientific
» breakthrough, they caution that it does not mean a treatment or cure for
» male pattern baldness is imminent.
»
» “We’ve only identified a cause,” Richards said. “Treating male pattern
» baldness will require more research. But, of course, the first step in
» finding a way to treat most conditions it is to first identify the cause.”
»
» “Early prediction before hair loss starts may lead to some interesting
» therapies that are more effective than treating late stage hair loss,”
» added Spector, of King’s College and director of the TwinsUK cohort study.
»
» Researchers have long been aware of a genetic variant on the X chromosome
» that was linked to male pattern baldness, Richards said.
»
» “That’s where the idea that baldness is inherited from the mother’s side
» of the family comes from,” he explained. “However it’s been long recognized
» that that there must be several genes causing male pattern baldness. Until
» now, no one could identify those other genes. If you have both the risk
» variants we discovered on chromosome 20 and the unrelated known variant on
» the X chromosome, your risk of becoming bald increases sevenfold.”
»
» “What’s startling is that one in seven men have both of those risk
» variants. That’s 14 per cent of the total population!”
»
» Source: Science Daily
» http://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2008/10/081012164437.htm

here’s the only sentence that matters:
“However it’s been long recognized
» that that there must be several genes causing male pattern baldness.”

maybe they discovered one of the genes. There are still likely several more at play. This discovery will not lead to a treatment or a cure anytime soon.


#15

You’re right clayshaw. But is there any money to be made in a cure? All the money is in “treatments”. Isn’t that why there aren’t many cures today? Just thinking out loud…

» » Yes the genes were located prior to Japan’s discovery (but something
» tells
» » me it’s not the same discovery; i.e. MPB vs alopecia areta). The
» discovery
» » below DOES infact indicate that the genes to MALE PATTERN BALDNESS were
» » discovered. Not Alopecia Areta-which is excellent news.
» »
» » Now the question is whether or not this will benefit only those who
» have
» » YET to be affected by MPB (early treatment/therapy,) or as well as those
» in
» » their later stages of MPB (thats us guys). Took about 12 years to find
» the
» » gene (cause), how much more time before therapy is in place for the
» public
» » is the next big question.
» »
» » Baldness Gene Discovered: 1 In 7 Men At Risk
» »
» » ScienceDaily (Oct. 13, 2008) — Researchers at McGill University, King’s
» » College London and GlaxoSmithKline Inc. have identified two genetic
» » variants in Caucasians that together produce an astounding sevenfold
» » increase the risk of male pattern baldness.
» »
» » About a third of all men are affected by male pattern baldness by age
» 45.
» » The condition’s social and economic impact is considerable:
» expenditures
» » for hair transplantation in the United States alone exceeded $115
» million
» » (U.S.) in 2007, while global revenues for medical therapy for
» male-pattern
» » baldness recently surpassed $405 million. Male pattern baldness is the
» most
» » common form of baldness, where hair is lost in a well-defined pattern
» » beginning above both temples, and results in a distinctive M-shaped
» » hairline. Estimates suggest more than 80 per cent of cases are
» hereditary.
» »
» » This study was conducted by Dr. Vincent Mooser of GlaxoSmithKline, Dr.
» » Brent Richards of McGill University’s Faculty of Medicine and the
» » affiliated Jewish General Hospital (and formerly of King’s College),
» and
» » Dr. Tim Spector of King’s College. Along with colleagues in Iceland,
» » Switzerland and the Netherlands, the researchers conducted a
» genome-wide
» » association study of 1,125 Caucasian men who had been assessed for male
» » pattern baldness. They found two previously unknown genetic variants on
» » chromosome 20 that substantially increased the risk of male pattern
» » baldness. They then confirmed these findings in an additional 1,650
» » Caucasian men.
» »
» » “I would presume male pattern baldness is caused by the same genetic
» » variation in non-caucasians,” said Richards, an assistant professor in
» » genetic epidemiology, “but we haven’t studied those populations, so we
» » can’t say for certain.”
» »
» » Though the researchers consider their discovery to be a scientific
» » breakthrough, they caution that it does not mean a treatment or cure
» for
» » male pattern baldness is imminent.
» »
» » “We’ve only identified a cause,” Richards said. “Treating male pattern
» » baldness will require more research. But, of course, the first step in
» » finding a way to treat most conditions it is to first identify the
» cause.”
» »
» » “Early prediction before hair loss starts may lead to some interesting
» » therapies that are more effective than treating late stage hair loss,”
» » added Spector, of King’s College and director of the TwinsUK cohort
» study.
» »
» » Researchers have long been aware of a genetic variant on the X
» chromosome
» » that was linked to male pattern baldness, Richards said.
» »
» » “That’s where the idea that baldness is inherited from the mother’s
» side
» » of the family comes from,” he explained. “However it’s been long
» recognized
» » that that there must be several genes causing male pattern baldness.
» Until
» » now, no one could identify those other genes. If you have both the risk
» » variants we discovered on chromosome 20 and the unrelated known variant
» on
» » the X chromosome, your risk of becoming bald increases sevenfold.”
» »
» » “What’s startling is that one in seven men have both of those risk
» » variants. That’s 14 per cent of the total population!”
» »
» » Source: Science Daily
» » http://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2008/10/081012164437.htm
»
» here’s the only sentence that matters:
» “However it’s been long recognized
» » that that there must be several genes causing male pattern baldness.”
»
» maybe they discovered one of the genes. There are still likely several
» more at play. This discovery will not lead to a treatment or a cure anytime
» soon.


#16

» You’re right clayshaw. But is there any money to be made in a cure? All the
» money is in “treatments”. Isn’t that why there aren’t many cures today?
» Just thinking out loud…
»
» » » Yes the genes were located prior to Japan’s discovery (but something
» » tells
» » » me it’s not the same discovery; i.e. MPB vs alopecia areta). The
» » discovery
» » » below DOES infact indicate that the genes to MALE PATTERN BALDNESS
» were
» » » discovered. Not Alopecia Areta-which is excellent news.
» » »
» » » Now the question is whether or not this will benefit only those who
» » have
» » » YET to be affected by MPB (early treatment/therapy,) or as well as
» those
» » in
» » » their later stages of MPB (thats us guys). Took about 12 years to
» find
» » the
» » » gene (cause), how much more time before therapy is in place for the
» » public
» » » is the next big question.
» » »
» » » Baldness Gene Discovered: 1 In 7 Men At Risk
» » »
» » » ScienceDaily (Oct. 13, 2008) — Researchers at McGill University,
» King’s
» » » College London and GlaxoSmithKline Inc. have identified two genetic
» » » variants in Caucasians that together produce an astounding sevenfold
» » » increase the risk of male pattern baldness.
» » »
» » » About a third of all men are affected by male pattern baldness by age
» » 45.
» » » The condition’s social and economic impact is considerable:
» » expenditures
» » » for hair transplantation in the United States alone exceeded $115
» » million
» » » (U.S.) in 2007, while global revenues for medical therapy for
» » male-pattern
» » » baldness recently surpassed $405 million. Male pattern baldness is
» the
» » most
» » » common form of baldness, where hair is lost in a well-defined pattern
» » » beginning above both temples, and results in a distinctive M-shaped
» » » hairline. Estimates suggest more than 80 per cent of cases are
» » hereditary.
» » »
» » » This study was conducted by Dr. Vincent Mooser of GlaxoSmithKline,
» Dr.
» » » Brent Richards of McGill University’s Faculty of Medicine and the
» » » affiliated Jewish General Hospital (and formerly of King’s College),
» » and
» » » Dr. Tim Spector of King’s College. Along with colleagues in Iceland,
» » » Switzerland and the Netherlands, the researchers conducted a
» » genome-wide
» » » association study of 1,125 Caucasian men who had been assessed for
» male
» » » pattern baldness. They found two previously unknown genetic variants
» on
» » » chromosome 20 that substantially increased the risk of male pattern
» » » baldness. They then confirmed these findings in an additional 1,650
» » » Caucasian men.
» » »
» » » “I would presume male pattern baldness is caused by the same genetic
» » » variation in non-caucasians,” said Richards, an assistant professor
» in
» » » genetic epidemiology, “but we haven’t studied those populations, so
» we
» » » can’t say for certain.”
» » »
» » » Though the researchers consider their discovery to be a scientific
» » » breakthrough, they caution that it does not mean a treatment or cure
» » for
» » » male pattern baldness is imminent.
» » »
» » » “We’ve only identified a cause,” Richards said. “Treating male
» pattern
» » » baldness will require more research. But, of course, the first step
» in
» » » finding a way to treat most conditions it is to first identify the
» » cause.”
» » »
» » » “Early prediction before hair loss starts may lead to some
» interesting
» » » therapies that are more effective than treating late stage hair
» loss,”
» » » added Spector, of King’s College and director of the TwinsUK cohort
» » study.
» » »
» » » Researchers have long been aware of a genetic variant on the X
» » chromosome
» » » that was linked to male pattern baldness, Richards said.
» » »
» » » “That’s where the idea that baldness is inherited from the mother’s
» » side
» » » of the family comes from,” he explained. “However it’s been long
» » recognized
» » » that that there must be several genes causing male pattern baldness.
» » Until
» » » now, no one could identify those other genes. If you have both the
» risk
» » » variants we discovered on chromosome 20 and the unrelated known
» variant
» » on
» » » the X chromosome, your risk of becoming bald increases sevenfold.”
» » »
» » » “What’s startling is that one in seven men have both of those risk
» » » variants. That’s 14 per cent of the total population!”
» » »
» » » Source: Science Daily
» » » http://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2008/10/081012164437.htm
» »
» » here’s the only sentence that matters:
» » “However it’s been long recognized
» » » that that there must be several genes causing male pattern baldness.”
» »
» » maybe they discovered one of the genes. There are still likely several
» » more at play. This discovery will not lead to a treatment or a cure
» anytime
» » soon.

Yep. Chris Rock put it best: "A drug dealer makes his money on the come back."
That said, multiplication is, in essence, a cure. If “safe” hairs are transplanted onto the top of your head, and there is an unlimited number of “safe” hairs, then you are cured.


#17

» Do you suffer from side effects Muscleboy? Have you tried lowering your
» dosage??

I do have sexual side effects (not extremely severe, but still there), and I don’t know how much lower I can go than 1 mg :).


#18

Just spend 3 minutes with a pocket calculator actually crunching the numbers on the profits and percentages of the population. You will TOTALLY stop believing in any conspiracies against a better MPB treatment.


#19

I’m all for treatment Cal. And I’m very “optimistic” about a cure in the future. But everytime the logical portion of my brain kicks in the hopes die out. I’m all for treatment but the 2 FDA approved treatments are Minoxidil and Propecia. BOTH of which have been stumbled upon accidently. Then we have dutasteride…also stumbled upon by accident. Saw Palmetto…also accidently found to help block DHT naturally.

So if you really think about it, if these 4, minox-propecia-dut-saw palmetto, weren’t stumbled upon by accident would we actually have male pattern baldness treatments? What would we have done? 80% of the people on the meds would have gone for hair transplant. Which treatment on the market was actually intended for MPB from scratch? None-Zero. Now knowing that not a single treatment on the market was actually intended for hairloss, what makes us think there will be enhanced treatments in the future for hairloss? (Accidents don’t count). So far luck’s been on our side.

» Just spend 3 minutes with a pocket calculator actually crunching the
» numbers on the profits and percentages of the population. You will TOTALLY
» stop believing in any conspiracies against a better MPB treatment.


#20

The transplant clinics have about as much chance of squashing a real MPB cure as the makeup companies have at suppressing a cure for aging. It’s the raw numbers again. The entire transplant industry is just a handful of private-practicing doctors making a living with their hands. We may resent the prices they charge us, but as a whole their industry is pitifully small compared to what’s at stake here and who else stands to profit from it.

A lot of people would argue that Finasteride’s hair gains were not a surprise. Merck already knew that the genetically 5ar-lacking men also didn’t lose hair when they first developed the stuff. Just because the makers didn’t aim for hair loss with the first product, that doesn’t demonstrate that it was a truly accidental finding.

And even if it was an accidental discovery, what would that prove?

A decent MPB treatment is still a cash-cow the size of Texas. It’s second only to a treatment that reverses hair graying for the pure profit potential.

There are still several things in the FDA pipeline between loss-fighting substances and more direct HM plans. There is still 1000% reason to wanna see them work to fruition with a feasible commerical product.

People are so worried that the big ugly powers would wanna squash anything that might give them some hair back. I don’t think anything could be farther from the truth. If anything I think we should be more worried that they’ll use that influence over the FDA to get the product to us TOO fast, risking potential safety issues.