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Safest Hair Dye? I don\'t want any hair to break or fall off


#1

What’s the safest hair dye?


#2

There are four types of hair dyes available -
Gradual, temporary, semi-permanent and permanent.

Which one you want to use?


#3

Gradual hair dyes, also known as metallic or progressive hair dyes, require repeated application to result in gradual darkening of the hair shaft.

This product will change the hair color from gray to yellow-brown to black over a period of weeks. There is no control over the final color of the hair, only the depth of color, and lightening is not possible.

The popularity of gradual hair dyes is due to their low cost and the ability to perform the dyeing procedures at home without the assistance of a professional operator. They must be properly applied, however, or poor color quality, stiff, brittle, and dull hair may result.

In addition, the trace metals left on the hair do not allow predictable results when combined with other dyeing or permanent waving procedures. The metal can cause breakdown of the hydrogen peroxide in bleaching or permanent waving products, resulting in rupture of the hair shaft. Hair that has been treated with a gradual hair colorant must therefore grow out before other dyeing or waving procedures are used to guarantee an optimal result.

This type of hair coloring is most popular among men who wish to only blend their gray hair and effect hair color darkening gradually. Men also tend to cut their hair frequently, which removes the hair that may have been damaged by repeated use of the metallic dye.


#4

Temporary hair dyes

Temporary hair coloring agents comprise only 3% of the hair coloring market and are removed in one shampooing. They are used to add a slight tint, brighten a natural shade, or improve an existing dyed shade.

However, the dye can be easily rubbed off the hair shaft and can run onto clothing if the hair gets wet from rain or perspiration. Temporary hair dyes do not damage the hair shaft and may be used by persons who are allergic to paraphenylenediamine.

There are several formulations of temporary dyes: liquid, mousse, and gel. Liquid temporary hair colorants are also referred to as ‘hair rinses’ since they are frequently applied in the shower following shampooing, with the excess dyestuff removed by rinsing.


#5

well it’s for my mother. her hair is brittle. I want to color her greys.

I read about Henna powder from india. But read it doesn’t really produce that much color change.

I want to make absolutely sure this color will also be good for her hair. no bleaching or any ammonia is what I’m lead to understand.

Also the longer lasting the better. low maintenance.


#6

Henna is a semipermanent dye because minimal cuticle penetration occurs allowing removal of the dye in 4–6 shampooings. The leaves of the henna plant contain a natural acidic naphthoquinone dye.The paste was placed on the head for several hours to produce a characteristic orange-red hair color.

More recently, henna has been combined with metallic salts to produce what is termed a ‘compound henna’, to provide a wider range of colors.

Natural hennas are inferior to synthetic hennas because they leave the hair stiff and brittle after repeated applications.


#7

» Henna is a semipermanent dye because minimal cuticle penetration
» occurs allowing removal of the dye in 4–6 shampooings. The leaves of the
» henna plant contain a natural acidic naphthoquinone dye.The paste was
» placed on the head for several hours to produce a characteristic orange-red
» hair color.
»
» More recently, henna has been combined with metallic salts to produce what
» is termed a ‘compound henna’, to provide a wider range of colors.
»
» Natural hennas are inferior to synthetic hennas because they leave the
» hair stiff and brittle after repeated applications.

Thanks, yeah I think I will try that for my mother.


#8

Semipermanent Hair dyes

Semipermanent hair coloring accounts for only 10% of the current hair care market. They are designed for use on natural, unbleached hair to cover gray, add highlights, or rid hair of unwanted tones.

Semipermanent dyes produce tone-on-tone coloring rather than effecting drastic color changes, so their role is actually in toning rather than
dyeing hair. The less color change required by the patient, the more satisfied he or she will be with the semipermanent dye result.

Semipermanent dyes are best suited for patients with less than 30% gray hair who want to restore their natural color.There are several different types of semi-permanent hair dyes based on the derivation of the dye. These include textile dyes, vegetable dyes, and synthetic hair stains.

Semipermanent hair colorings derived from textile dyes are popular with both men and women. Since human hair is basically a textile, dyes for wool and natural fiber cloths are well suited for adaptation to hair dyeing.

The very first hair dye ever developed historically was a vegetable dye known as henna. Today, synthetic henna-type products have replaced natural henna dyes with dye shades ranging from auburn to blond to gray. Natural hennas are inferior to synthetic hennas because they leave the hair stiff and brittle after repeated applications.

A newer type of semipermanent hair coloring is hair stain. Hair stain is a synthetic polymer, usually in unnatural shades such as red, blue, purple, or yellow, that imparts a hue or highlight to the hair


#9

Demipermanent dyes

A newer form of hair coloring that is longer-lasting than semipermanent dyes, but still not permanent, is known as demipermanent hair coloring.

They are longer-lasting, usually remaining through 10–12 shampooings, and have the advantage of longevity without sharp color contrast with new growth, a characteristic of permanent hair dyes.

Demipermanent dyes are not as damaging to the hair shaft as permanent hair dyes, but may contain paraphylenediamine and thus may possibly cause allergic contact dermatitis in sensitized individuals.


#10

Permanent dyes

Permanent hair coloring is the most popular hair coloring technique on the market today, accounting for 85% of hair dyes sold for both professional salon and home use.

Redyeing is necessary every 4–6 weeks, as new growth, known in the cosmetic industry as ‘roots,’ appears at the scalp.

Permanent hair coloring is so named because the dyestuff penetrates the hair shaft to the cortex and forms large color molecules that cannot be removed by shampooing.

This type of hair coloring does not contain dyes, but rather colorless dye precursors that chemically react with hydrogen.


#11

» Permanent dyes
»
» Permanent hair coloring is the most popular hair coloring technique on the
» market today, accounting for 85% of hair dyes sold for both professional
» salon and home use.
»
» Redyeing is necessary every 4–6 weeks, as new growth, known in the
» cosmetic industry as ‘roots,’ appears at the scalp.
»
» Permanent hair coloring is so named because the dyestuff penetrates the
» hair shaft to the cortex and forms large color molecules that cannot be
» removed by shampooing.
»
» This type of hair coloring does not contain dyes, but rather colorless dye
» precursors that chemically react with hydrogen.

great. thanks for the info.