Home | News | Find a Doctor | Ask a Question | Free

Resveratrol as a Baldness Cure


#1

Hey everyone,

I’m trying to make sense of the relationship between insulin growth factor, propecia and resveratrol. I think they’re all linked but I don’t know enough info to know how or why. What I’m thinking is that taking resveratrol will increase IGF-1 in the scalp (while decreasing it in other bodily tissues such as the prostate gland), and thus stop baldness in its tracks.

Here are the studies I’m trying to grasp with:


The expression of insulin-like growth factor 1 in follicular dermal papillae correlates with therapeutic efficacy of finasteride in androgenetic alopecia.

Tang L, Bernardo O, Bolduc C, Lui H, Madani S, Shapiro J.

Division of Dermatology, The University of British Columbia, Vancouver Hospital, Canada.

BACKGROUND: It is generally believed that dihydrotestosterone is one of the pivotal mediators of hair loss in androgenetic alopecia (AGA). Finasteride, which blocks the conversion of testosterone to dihydrotestosterone, has now become an integral part of the current treatment approaches for male AGA. Several lines of evidence support the notion that dermal papilla (DP) cells represent the androgen target within the hair follicle. The specific molecular regulators modulated by androgens within hair follicles in the balding scalp are unknown. OBJECTIVE: The purpose of this study was to identify and quantify changes in expression of specific molecular hair growth regulators in DP of men with AGA treated with finasteride and correlate these findings to clinical efficacy. METHODS: Biopsy specimens were collected from 9 male patients from both the balding area and nonbalding occipital area before and after 4 months of finasteride therapy. DP were microdissected and total RNA was extracted from an equal number of DP from each biopsy specimen. The expression of various cytokines, including insulin-like growth factor (IGF)-1, was determined by reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction. The signals were detected by autoradiography. All 9 patients were given finasteride for 1 year and evaluated for efficacy at month 12. Efficacy was graded on a 7-point scale on the basis of comparison with initial baseline photography. RESULTS: IGF-1 was up-regulated by finasteride treatment in 4 of 9 patients. Among the patients with increased IGF-1 expression, 3 of them showed moderate clinical improvement after 12 months of treatment and another patient remained unchanged. In contrast, 3 patients with decreased IGF-1 expression in the balding scalp showed clinical worsening after 12 months. The other 2 patients without noticeable change in IGF-1 expression showed either slight improvement or no change in their hair condition. CONCLUSION: In a small uncontrolled study of 9 patients with AGA, an increased expression of IGF-1 messenger RNA levels in the DP was associated with patient response to finasteride.


Androgenetic Alopecia and Prostate Cancer: Findings from an Australian Case-Control Study1
Graham G. Giles2, Gianluca Severi, Rod Sinclair, Dallas R. English, Margaret R. E. McCredie, Warren Johnson, Peter Boyle and John L. Hopper

Cancer Epidemiology Centre, Anti-Cancer Council of Victoria, Melbourne, VIC 3053 Australia [G. G. G., D. R. E.]; Division of Epidemiology and Biostatistics, European Institute of Oncology, 1-20141, Milan, Italy [G. S., P. B.]; Department of Dermatology, St. Vincent’s Hospital, Melbourne, VIC 3065 Australia [R. S.]; Department of Preventive and Social Medicine, Dunedin Medical School, University of Otago, New Zealand 9001 [M. R. E. M.]; Cancer Epidemiology Research Unit, New South Wales Cancer Council, Sydney, 2011 New South Wales, Australia [M. R. E. M.]; Department of Public Health, University of Western Australia, Perth, 6009 Australia [D. R. E.]; Royal Melbourne Hospital, Melbourne, 3052 Australia [W. J.]; and Centre for Genetic Epidemiology, University of Melbourne, Melbourne, 3052 Australia [J. L. H.]

The purpose of this study was to examine the relationship between androgenetic alopecia (AA) and prostate cancer with particular emphasis on early age at diagnosis and higher grade tumors. We conducted an age-stratified, population-based case-control study in Australia of men who were diagnosed before 70 years of age during 1994–1997 with histopathology-confirmed adenocarcinoma of the prostate, excluding well-differentiated tumors. Controls were selected from the electoral rolls, and the frequency was matched on age. After excluding subjects with missing values, the analysis was based on 1446 cases and 1390 controls of whom direct observations were made of their pattern of AA during face-to-face interviews. Our data suggest an association between prostate cancer and vertex baldness; compared with men who had no balding, the adjusted odds ratio (OR) was 1.54 (1.19–2.00). No associations were found between prostate cancer and frontal baldness or when frontal baldness was present concurrently with vertex baldness. The ORs were 0.98 (0.79–1.23) and 1.14 (0.90–1.45), respectively. The highest ORs were for high-grade disease in men 60–69 years of age: 1.80 (1.02–3.16) for frontal baldness; 2.91 (1.59–5.32) for vertex baldness; and 1.95 (1.10–3.45) for frontal and vertex baldness. This association between the pattern of AA and prostate cancer points to shared androgen pathways that are worthy of additional investigation.


Carcinogenesis. 2007 Aug 3

Resveratrol Suppresses Prostate Cancer Progression in Transgenic Mice.
Harper CE, Patel BB, Wang J, Arabshahi A, Eltoum IA, Lamartiniere CA.

Department of Pharmacology and Toxicology, University of Alabama at Birmingham, Birmingham, Alabama.

Resveratrol, a natural polyphenolic phytochemical, has been reported to act as an antioxidant and provide anti-cancer activities. We hypothesized that resveratrol would exert a chemopreventive effect against prostate cancer via regulation of sex steroid receptor and growth factor signaling pathways. In the current study, Transgenic Adenocarcinoma Mouse Prostate (TRAMP) males were fed resveratrol (625 mg resveratrol/kg AIN-76A diet) or phytoestrogen-free, control diet (AIN-76A) starting at five weeks of age. Mechanisms of action and histopathology studies were conducted at 12 and 28 weeks of age, respectively. Resveratrol in the diet significantly reduced the incidence of poorly differentiated prostatic adenocarcinoma by 7.7-fold. In the dorsolateral prostate (DLP), resveratrol significantly inhibited cell proliferation, increased androgen receptor (AR), estrogen receptor-beta (ER-beta), and insulin-like growth factor-1 receptor (IGF-1R), and significantly decreased IGF-1, and phospho-extracellular regulating kinase 1 (phospho-ERK 1). In the ventral prostate (VP), resveratrol significantly reduced cell proliferation and phospho-ERKs 1 and 2, but did not significantly alter IGF-1R and IGF-1. Serum total testosterone, free testosterone, estradiol, dihydrotestosterone (DHT), and sex hormone binding globulin (SHBG) concentrations and SV-40 Tag expression in the prostate were not altered in resveratrol-treated mice. Total resveratrol concentration in the blood serum of 12 week old mice treated for three weeks with 625 mg resveratrol/kg diet was 52 +/- 18 nM. The decrease in cell proliferation and the potent growth factor, IGF-1, the down-regulation of downstream effectors, phospho-ERKs 1 and 2, and the increase in the putative tumor suppressor, ER-beta, provide a biochemical basis for resveratrol suppressing prostate cancer development.


#2

» Hey everyone,
»
» I’m trying to make sense of the relationship between insulin growth
» factor, propecia and resveratrol. I think they’re all linked but I don’t
» know enough info to know how or why. What I’m thinking is that taking
» resveratrol will increase IGF-1 in the scalp (while decreasing it in other
» bodily tissues such as the prostate gland),
and thus stop baldness in
» its tracks.
»
» Here are the studies I’m trying to grasp with:
»
» ***********************************************
» The expression of insulin-like growth factor 1 in follicular dermal
» papillae correlates with therapeutic efficacy of finasteride in
» androgenetic alopecia.
»
» Tang L, Bernardo O, Bolduc C, Lui H, Madani S, Shapiro J.
»
» Division of Dermatology, The University of British Columbia, Vancouver
» Hospital, Canada.
»
» BACKGROUND: It is generally believed that dihydrotestosterone is one of
» the pivotal mediators of hair loss in androgenetic alopecia (AGA).
» Finasteride, which blocks the conversion of testosterone to
» dihydrotestosterone, has now become an integral part of the current
» treatment approaches for male AGA. Several lines of evidence support the
» notion that dermal papilla (DP) cells represent the androgen target within
» the hair follicle. The specific molecular regulators modulated by androgens
» within hair follicles in the balding scalp are unknown. OBJECTIVE: The
» purpose of this study was to identify and quantify changes in expression
» of specific molecular hair growth regulators in DP of men with AGA treated
» with finasteride and correlate these findings to clinical efficacy.
» METHODS: Biopsy specimens were collected from 9 male patients from both
» the balding area and nonbalding occipital area before and after 4 months
» of finasteride therapy. DP were microdissected and total RNA was extracted
» from an equal number of DP from each biopsy specimen. The expression of
» various cytokines, including insulin-like growth factor (IGF)-1, was
» determined by reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction. The signals
» were detected by autoradiography. All 9 patients were given finasteride for
» 1 year and evaluated for efficacy at month 12. Efficacy was graded on a
» 7-point scale on the basis of comparison with initial baseline
» photography. RESULTS: IGF-1 was up-regulated by finasteride treatment in 4
» of 9 patients. Among the patients with increased IGF-1 expression, 3 of
» them showed moderate clinical improvement after 12 months of treatment and
» another patient remained unchanged.
In contrast, 3 patients with
» decreased IGF-1 expression in the balding scalp showed clinical worsening
» after 12 months. The other 2 patients without noticeable change in IGF-1
» expression showed either slight improvement or no change in their hair
» condition. CONCLUSION: In a small uncontrolled study of 9 patients with
» AGA, an increased expression of IGF-1 messenger RNA levels in the DP was
» associated with patient response to finasteride.

»
» *****************************************
»
» Androgenetic Alopecia and Prostate Cancer: Findings from an Australian
» Case-Control Study1
» Graham G. Giles2, Gianluca Severi, Rod Sinclair, Dallas R. English,
» Margaret R. E. McCredie, Warren Johnson, Peter Boyle and John L. Hopper
»
» Cancer Epidemiology Centre, Anti-Cancer Council of Victoria, Melbourne,
» VIC 3053 Australia [G. G. G., D. R. E.]; Division of Epidemiology and
» Biostatistics, European Institute of Oncology, 1-20141, Milan, Italy [G.
» S., P. B.]; Department of Dermatology, St. Vincent’s Hospital, Melbourne,
» VIC 3065 Australia [R. S.]; Department of Preventive and Social Medicine,
» Dunedin Medical School, University of Otago, New Zealand 9001 [M. R. E.
» M.]; Cancer Epidemiology Research Unit, New South Wales Cancer Council,
» Sydney, 2011 New South Wales, Australia [M. R. E. M.]; Department of
» Public Health, University of Western Australia, Perth, 6009 Australia [D.
» R. E.]; Royal Melbourne Hospital, Melbourne, 3052 Australia [W. J.]; and
» Centre for Genetic Epidemiology, University of Melbourne, Melbourne, 3052
» Australia [J. L. H.]
»
» The purpose of this study was to examine the relationship between
» androgenetic alopecia (AA) and prostate cancer with particular emphasis on
» early age at diagnosis and higher grade tumors. We conducted an
» age-stratified, population-based case-control study in Australia of men
» who were diagnosed before 70 years of age during 1994–1997 with
» histopathology-confirmed adenocarcinoma of the prostate, excluding
» well-differentiated tumors. Controls were selected from the electoral
» rolls, and the frequency was matched on age. After excluding subjects with
» missing values, the analysis was based on 1446 cases and 1390 controls of
» whom direct observations were made of their pattern of AA during
» face-to-face interviews. Our data suggest an association between
» prostate cancer and vertex baldness;
compared with men who had no
» balding, the adjusted odds ratio (OR) was 1.54 (1.19–2.00). No
» associations were found between prostate cancer and frontal baldness or
» when frontal baldness was present concurrently with vertex baldness. The
» ORs were 0.98 (0.79–1.23) and 1.14 (0.90–1.45), respectively. The highest
» ORs were for high-grade disease in men 60–69 years of age: 1.80
» (1.02–3.16) for frontal baldness; 2.91 (1.59–5.32) for vertex baldness;
» and 1.95 (1.10–3.45) for frontal and vertex baldness. This association
» between the pattern of AA and prostate cancer points to shared androgen
» pathways that are worthy of additional investigation.
»
» ***************************************************
»
» Carcinogenesis. 2007 Aug 3
»
» Resveratrol Suppresses Prostate Cancer Progression in Transgenic Mice.
» Harper CE, Patel BB, Wang J, Arabshahi A, Eltoum IA, Lamartiniere CA.
»
» Department of Pharmacology and Toxicology, University of Alabama at
» Birmingham, Birmingham, Alabama.
»
» Resveratrol, a natural polyphenolic phytochemical, has been reported to
» act as an antioxidant and provide anti-cancer activities. We hypothesized
» that resveratrol would exert a chemopreventive effect against prostate
» cancer via regulation of sex steroid receptor and growth factor signaling
» pathways. In the current study, Transgenic Adenocarcinoma Mouse Prostate
» (TRAMP) males were fed resveratrol (625 mg resveratrol/kg AIN-76A diet) or
» phytoestrogen-free, control diet (AIN-76A) starting at five weeks of age.
» Mechanisms of action and histopathology studies were conducted at 12 and
» 28 weeks of age, respectively. Resveratrol in the diet significantly
» reduced the incidence of poorly differentiated prostatic adenocarcinoma by
» 7.7-fold. In the dorsolateral prostate (DLP), resveratrol significantly
» inhibited cell proliferation, increased androgen receptor (AR), estrogen
» receptor-beta (ER-beta), and insulin-like growth factor-1 receptor
» (IGF-1R), and significantly decreased IGF-1, and phospho-extracellular
» regulating kinase 1 (phospho-ERK 1). In the ventral prostate (VP),
» resveratrol significantly reduced cell proliferation and phospho-ERKs 1
» and 2, but did not significantly alter IGF-1R and IGF-1.
Serum total
» testosterone, free testosterone, estradiol, dihydrotestosterone (DHT), and
» sex hormone binding globulin (SHBG) concentrations and SV-40 Tag expression
» in the prostate were not altered in resveratrol-treated mice. Total
» resveratrol concentration in the blood serum of 12 week old mice treated
» for three weeks with 625 mg resveratrol/kg diet was 52 +/- 18 nM. The
» decrease in cell proliferation and the potent growth factor, IGF-1, the
» down-regulation of downstream effectors, phospho-ERKs 1 and 2, and the
» increase in the putative tumor suppressor, ER-beta, provide a biochemical
» basis for resveratrol suppressing prostate cancer development.

resveratrol is a bit dangerous
its a blood thinner, albeit a natural one


#3

» resveratrol is a bit dangerous
» its a blood thinner, albeit a natural one

I don’t think blood thinner is dangerous. otoh, if someone has thick blood is dangarous (blood clogging problem)


#4

Dangerous?

What is your experience with this natural; or is this something else that you just got off the Internet.

What is your source?


#5

» Dangerous?
»
» What is your experience with this natural; or is this something else that
» you just got off the Internet.
»
» What is your source?

google it


#6

Sorry, I might have missed something but where did it say that Resveratrol increased IGF-I.


#7

:stuck_out_tongue:


#8

» :stuck_out_tongue:

notice that you responded to yourself

you really are not that bright are you:-P :stuck_out_tongue: :stuck_out_tongue:


#9

» :stuck_out_tongue:


#10

I was made aware that L’OREAL, has included resveratrol in their internal product used to combat hair loss.

I, personally, did not have any success with resveratrol when I used it a couple of years ago. Perhaps, I will try it again, in combination with the other herbs that they use.


#11

It’s in the Grape Seed Plus I’ve been taking for a few months. Cheap from Walmart.


#12

So this is what I’m speculating, but keep in mind this is so speculative and it’s likely my misreading of the abstracts. BUT… suppose if:

  1. Resveratrol increases/activates the receptor for IGF-1.
  2. Propecia increases IGF-1 in the scalp.

So… resveratrol plus propecia = a potent hair loss blocker. IOW, resveratrol supplementation will help make propecia work more effectively for those whom it does not.

Thoughts/comments?

P.S. This is truly BS on my part right now :smiley:


#13

.


#14

» So this is what I’m speculating, but keep in mind this is so speculative
» and it’s likely my misreading of the abstracts. BUT… suppose if:
» 1. Resveratrol increases/activates the receptor for IGF-1.
» 2. Propecia increases IGF-1 in the scalp.
»
» So… resveratrol plus propecia = a potent hair loss blocker. IOW,
» resveratrol supplementation will help make propecia work more effectively
» for those whom it does not.
»
» Thoughts/comments?
»
» P.S. This is truly BS on my part right now :smiley:

I am not convinced that Resveratrol is safe
it is such a potent blood thinner that a friend of mine, whose gums used to bleed slightly sometimes when he brushed his teeth…after starting on resveratrol, had to stop, because his gums bled so much it was like someone punched him in the mouth

the effectiveness of resveratrol, or whether it has life extension properties in humans same as it did in rats, is being debated,

its a strange supplement for sure


#15

» Hey everyone,
»
» I’m trying to make sense of the relationship between insulin growth
» factor, propecia and resveratrol. I think they’re all linked but I don’t
» know enough info to know how or why. What I’m thinking is that taking
» resveratrol will increase IGF-1 in the scalp (while decreasing it in other
» bodily tissues such as the prostate gland),
and thus stop baldness in
» its tracks.
»
» Here are the studies I’m trying to grasp with:
»
» ***********************************************
» The expression of insulin-like growth factor 1 in follicular dermal
» papillae correlates with therapeutic efficacy of finasteride in
» androgenetic alopecia.
»
» Tang L, Bernardo O, Bolduc C, Lui H, Madani S, Shapiro J.
»
» Division of Dermatology, The University of British Columbia, Vancouver
» Hospital, Canada.
»
» BACKGROUND: It is generally believed that dihydrotestosterone is one of
» the pivotal mediators of hair loss in androgenetic alopecia (AGA).
» Finasteride, which blocks the conversion of testosterone to
» dihydrotestosterone, has now become an integral part of the current
» treatment approaches for male AGA. Several lines of evidence support the
» notion that dermal papilla (DP) cells represent the androgen target within
» the hair follicle. The specific molecular regulators modulated by androgens
» within hair follicles in the balding scalp are unknown. OBJECTIVE: The
» purpose of this study was to identify and quantify changes in expression
» of specific molecular hair growth regulators in DP of men with AGA treated
» with finasteride and correlate these findings to clinical efficacy.
» METHODS: Biopsy specimens were collected from 9 male patients from both
» the balding area and nonbalding occipital area before and after 4 months
» of finasteride therapy. DP were microdissected and total RNA was extracted
» from an equal number of DP from each biopsy specimen. The expression of
» various cytokines, including insulin-like growth factor (IGF)-1, was
» determined by reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction. The signals
» were detected by autoradiography. All 9 patients were given finasteride for
» 1 year and evaluated for efficacy at month 12. Efficacy was graded on a
» 7-point scale on the basis of comparison with initial baseline
» photography. RESULTS: IGF-1 was up-regulated by finasteride treatment in 4
» of 9 patients. Among the patients with increased IGF-1 expression, 3 of
» them showed moderate clinical improvement after 12 months of treatment and
» another patient remained unchanged.
In contrast, 3 patients with
» decreased IGF-1 expression in the balding scalp showed clinical worsening
» after 12 months. The other 2 patients without noticeable change in IGF-1
» expression showed either slight improvement or no change in their hair
» condition. CONCLUSION: In a small uncontrolled study of 9 patients with
» AGA, an increased expression of IGF-1 messenger RNA levels in the DP was
» associated with patient response to finasteride.

»
» *****************************************
»
» Androgenetic Alopecia and Prostate Cancer: Findings from an Australian
» Case-Control Study1
» Graham G. Giles2, Gianluca Severi, Rod Sinclair, Dallas R. English,
» Margaret R. E. McCredie, Warren Johnson, Peter Boyle and John L. Hopper
»
» Cancer Epidemiology Centre, Anti-Cancer Council of Victoria, Melbourne,
» VIC 3053 Australia [G. G. G., D. R. E.]; Division of Epidemiology and
» Biostatistics, European Institute of Oncology, 1-20141, Milan, Italy [G.
» S., P. B.]; Department of Dermatology, St. Vincent’s Hospital, Melbourne,
» VIC 3065 Australia [R. S.]; Department of Preventive and Social Medicine,
» Dunedin Medical School, University of Otago, New Zealand 9001 [M. R. E.
» M.]; Cancer Epidemiology Research Unit, New South Wales Cancer Council,
» Sydney, 2011 New South Wales, Australia [M. R. E. M.]; Department of
» Public Health, University of Western Australia, Perth, 6009 Australia [D.
» R. E.]; Royal Melbourne Hospital, Melbourne, 3052 Australia [W. J.]; and
» Centre for Genetic Epidemiology, University of Melbourne, Melbourne, 3052
» Australia [J. L. H.]
»
» The purpose of this study was to examine the relationship between
» androgenetic alopecia (AA) and prostate cancer with particular emphasis on
» early age at diagnosis and higher grade tumors. We conducted an
» age-stratified, population-based case-control study in Australia of men
» who were diagnosed before 70 years of age during 1994–1997 with
» histopathology-confirmed adenocarcinoma of the prostate, excluding
» well-differentiated tumors. Controls were selected from the electoral
» rolls, and the frequency was matched on age. After excluding subjects with
» missing values, the analysis was based on 1446 cases and 1390 controls of
» whom direct observations were made of their pattern of AA during
» face-to-face interviews. Our data suggest an association between
» prostate cancer and vertex baldness;
compared with men who had no
» balding, the adjusted odds ratio (OR) was 1.54 (1.19–2.00). No
» associations were found between prostate cancer and frontal baldness or
» when frontal baldness was present concurrently with vertex baldness. The
» ORs were 0.98 (0.79–1.23) and 1.14 (0.90–1.45), respectively. The highest
» ORs were for high-grade disease in men 60–69 years of age: 1.80
» (1.02–3.16) for frontal baldness; 2.91 (1.59–5.32) for vertex baldness;
» and 1.95 (1.10–3.45) for frontal and vertex baldness. This association
» between the pattern of AA and prostate cancer points to shared androgen
» pathways that are worthy of additional investigation.
»
» ***************************************************
»
» Carcinogenesis. 2007 Aug 3
»
» Resveratrol Suppresses Prostate Cancer Progression in Transgenic Mice.
» Harper CE, Patel BB, Wang J, Arabshahi A, Eltoum IA, Lamartiniere CA.
»
» Department of Pharmacology and Toxicology, University of Alabama at
» Birmingham, Birmingham, Alabama.
»
» Resveratrol, a natural polyphenolic phytochemical, has been reported to
» act as an antioxidant and provide anti-cancer activities. We hypothesized
» that resveratrol would exert a chemopreventive effect against prostate
» cancer via regulation of sex steroid receptor and growth factor signaling
» pathways. In the current study, Transgenic Adenocarcinoma Mouse Prostate
» (TRAMP) males were fed resveratrol (625 mg resveratrol/kg AIN-76A diet) or
» phytoestrogen-free, control diet (AIN-76A) starting at five weeks of age.
» Mechanisms of action and histopathology studies were conducted at 12 and
» 28 weeks of age, respectively. Resveratrol in the diet significantly
» reduced the incidence of poorly differentiated prostatic adenocarcinoma by
» 7.7-fold. In the dorsolateral prostate (DLP), resveratrol significantly
» inhibited cell proliferation, increased androgen receptor (AR), estrogen
» receptor-beta (ER-beta), and insulin-like growth factor-1 receptor
» (IGF-1R), and significantly decreased IGF-1, and phospho-extracellular
» regulating kinase 1 (phospho-ERK 1). In the ventral prostate (VP),
» resveratrol significantly reduced cell proliferation and phospho-ERKs 1
» and 2, but did not significantly alter IGF-1R and IGF-1.
Serum total
» testosterone, free testosterone, estradiol, dihydrotestosterone (DHT), and
» sex hormone binding globulin (SHBG) concentrations and SV-40 Tag expression
» in the prostate were not altered in resveratrol-treated mice. Total
» resveratrol concentration in the blood serum of 12 week old mice treated
» for three weeks with 625 mg resveratrol/kg diet was 52 +/- 18 nM. The
» decrease in cell proliferation and the potent growth factor, IGF-1, the
» down-regulation of downstream effectors, phospho-ERKs 1 and 2, and the
» increase in the putative tumor suppressor, ER-beta, provide a biochemical
» basis for resveratrol suppressing prostate cancer development.

++++

They is a ton more research in this area than this, obviously.

I take Resveratrol as part of my protocol, but you need to take it with Quercetin for it to be effective. A few Resv supplements are correctly formulated.

IGF-1 is more complex, hence one of the posts questioning trying to increase it. For a long time it was believed to be a negative influence on hair, much as Estrogen was believed to be a positive.

BOTH of these positions have now widely been reversed; IGF-1 = good, Estrogen = bad!

Yes IGF-1 increases androgen receptors, but this is more that balanced by it’s positive effects. It is an essential element of the anagen phase of the hair cycle.

Increasing IGF-1 is another thing; look for things that impact HGH, as IGF-1 is the hormone increased directly from HGH.

This is a complex subject and mirrors the endocrinology/intracrinology discussion of the androgens.


#16

“I take Resveratrol as part of my protocol, but you need to take it with Quercetin for it to be effective. A few Resv supplements are correctly formulated.”

Where did you get this information?


#17

“Scientists believe that resveratrol may be an extraordinarily effective chemopreventive and anticarcinogenic agent, based on laboratory and animal studies. But resveratrol poses an extraordinary problem: although it’s well absorbed (at least 70%) by the gut, its bioavailability is almost zero, owing to its rapid and extensive metabolism to two types of chemical derivatives: sulfates and glucuronides.1-4 It appears that most of the conversion of resveratrol to these metabolites occurs in the gut (the metabolites are readily absorbed into the bloodstream, however), and the process is completed by the liver within about half an hour. The result is that unmetabolized resveratrol is virtually undetectable in the blood.”

Does quercetin help with the bioavailability of resveratrol?


#18

This is how you increase bioavailability:

Step one: fill shot glass 1/4 with everclear.
Step two: put about 300 mg of 98% extract trans-resv into shot glass.
Step three: mix for about 3 minutes.
The solution will now be perfectly clear where as the resv is dissolved.
Step four: mix into water and Miralax (i.e., polyethylene glycol 3350)
When you pour the clear shot into the clear water/Miralax solution, it will instantly precipitate making a white cloud in the water, pretty cool looking.
Even without peg3350 mixed in, it is easy to tell that the resv is mixed in much better than it was with just water. While I have no way to measure particle size reduction, I imagine it is very large.
Step five: Zip up your man suit.
Step six: Drink.

Here’s the link:

Some people report that quercetin helps with bioavailability, and others take it with olive oil. But the proceure above is based on the work of David Sinclair at Harvard Med.

» “Scientists believe that resveratrol may be an extraordinarily effective
» chemopreventive and anticarcinogenic agent, based on laboratory and animal
» studies. But resveratrol poses an extraordinary problem: although it’s well
» absorbed (at least 70%) by the gut, its bioavailability is almost
» zero
, owing to its rapid and extensive metabolism to two types of
» chemical derivatives: sulfates and glucuronides.1-4 It appears that most
» of the conversion of resveratrol to these metabolites occurs in the gut
» (the metabolites are readily absorbed into the bloodstream, however), and
» the process is completed by the liver within about half an hour. The
» result is that unmetabolized resveratrol is virtually undetectable in the
» blood.”
»
» Does quercetin help with the bioavailability of resveratrol?


#19

Well, since the bioavailabilty of resveratrol is “almost zero”, the theory that drinking red wine for its health benefits (via resveratrol) must certainly be a myth? I imagine that the concentration of resveratrol in red wine must be quite low compared to resveratrol capsules. Something stinks here…


#20

» Well, since the bioavailabilty of resveratrol is “almost zero”, the theory
» that drinking red wine for its health benefits (via resveratrol) must
» certainly be a myth? I imagine that the concentration of resveratrol in
» red wine must be quite low compared to resveratrol capsules. Something
» stinks here…

the thing that gets me is , if drinking red wine extends life, and prevents heart disease etc ok fine

then why do the capsules not contain the amount of resveratrol that would be in about 3 glasses of wine per day
why do they contain the amount that would be like 1000 glasses or something wild like that

therein lies the mystery