Home | News | Find a Doctor | Ask a Question | Free

Removal of unwanted hair in strange places via CIT


#1

This patient had a face lift prior to coming to our office. The face lift resulted in an elevation of some beard hair to a region behind the ear. Most of the hair was white or lacked pigment. Hair without pigment will not respond to laser hair removal. Only darker, pigmented hairs will respond to laser hair removal. He had a difficult time shaving these hairs. Therefore, we excised them with CIT. These unwanted hairs will discontinue to grow behind the ears and the patient may even be able to shave his beard in less time.


#2

Hair without pigment will not respond to laser hair removal. Only darker, pigmented hairs will respond to laser hair removal.

Wow, really? Thats kind of interesting… Why is that?

and the patient may even be able to shave his beard in less time.

LOL… Okay come on now, this statement is just a little over the top dont you think? Like how much time is he really going to save now that he removed those 15 hairs!! 5 seconds?? LOL…
Kinda falls into the same category as their silly claim that CIT is better than strip because with strip white or grey hairs cannot be seen under the microscope therefore get wasted. To which we were later informed, after being called out, that most strip clinics use a dye anyway so they can be seen.

A little too much shameless marketing if you ask me…


#3

» Hair without pigment will not respond to laser hair removal. Only
» darker, pigmented hairs will respond to laser hair removal.

»
» Wow, really? Thats kind of interesting… Why is that?
»
The laser light selectively absorbed by the follicle damages its functions and impairs its ability to produce hair. At the level of the pilous follicle, the laser light absorbed by the pigments is then transformed into heat which damages the hair but not the surrounding skin. Pretty interesting concept.


#4

Great title! But, seriously, these out-of-the-norm cases are opportunities to expand the application of our techniques and learn something new. You’d probably be surprised how many people ask about removal of laser-resistant hairs.

It probably is hard to shave behind your ears. You can’t see, and the razor is likely too big. Imagine if your date noticed and pointed it out? I think it would bother me enough to have a short, inexpensive procedure.


#5

» Great title! But, seriously, these out-of-the-norm cases are opportunities
» to expand the application of our techniques and learn something new. You’d
» probably be surprised how many people ask about removal of laser-resistant
» hairs.
»
» It probably is hard to shave behind your ears. You can’t see, and the
» razor is likely too big. Imagine if your date noticed and pointed it out?
» I think it would bother me enough to have a short, inexpensive procedure.

Agreed. The industry should gbe under a constant state of alert in regards to advancement and study. How about a back hair test session, Aye?


#6

» This patient had a face lift prior to coming to our office. The face lift
» resulted in an elevation of some beard hair to a region behind the ear.
» Most of the hair was white or lacked pigment. Hair without pigment will
» not respond to laser hair removal. Only darker, pigmented hairs will
» respond to laser hair removal. He had a difficult time shaving these
» hairs. Therefore, we excised them with CIT. These unwanted hairs will
» discontinue to grow behind the ears and the patient may even be able to
» shave his beard in less time.
»
Electrolysis would work too.


#7

» Electrolysis would work too.

Yeah, why couldn’t he just use Electrolysis to remove the unwanted hair?


#8

» » Electrolysis would work too.
»
» Yeah, why couldn’t he just use Electrolysis to remove the unwanted hair?

Electrolysis can work. But, sometimes the hair is not killed when they zap it with the electrical current. This means that you may have to return for more, if not several, visits - and pay for each. Also, everytime they zap a hair, it hurts.

With excision, you come for one visit and you only feel a little prick from the inital anaesthesia injection.


#9

So how do all these surgeons doing body hair to head transplants avoid scarring patients when even the less intensive electrolysis has caused me some pigment changes and scarring that lasted for months in the past?

I just don’t understand all these great results from Dr. Arvind Poswal and Dr. Sanusi Umar regarding BHT from beard to scalp, where the patients have no scarring. I mean FUE is definitely more damaging than electrolysis I would think?


#10

» So how do all these surgeons doing body hair to head transplants avoid
» scarring patients when even the less intensive electrolysis has caused me
» some pigment changes and scarring that lasted for months in the past?
»
» I just don’t understand all these great results from Dr. Arvind Poswal and
» Dr. Sanusi Umar regarding BHT from beard to scalp, where the patients have
» no scarring. I mean FUE is definitely more damaging than electrolysis I
» would think?

No not really. The electrolysis is electrocution. It can kill the cells around the hair, under the skin. It is easier for the body to heal a small incision, especially on the beard, where the skin has laxity.

2 days of healing after beard hair extraction with Dr. Mwamba:


#11

» » So how do all these surgeons doing body hair to head transplants avoid
» » scarring patients when even the less intensive electrolysis has caused
» me
» » some pigment changes and scarring that lasted for months in the past?
» »
» » I just don’t understand all these great results from Dr. Arvind Poswal
» and
» » Dr. Sanusi Umar regarding BHT from beard to scalp, where the patients
» have
» » no scarring. I mean FUE is definitely more damaging than electrolysis
» I
» » would think?
»
» No not really. The electrolysis is electrocution. It can kill the cells
» around the hair, under the skin. It is easier for the body to heal a small
» incision, especially on the beard, where the skin has laxity.
»
» 2 days of healing after beard hair extraction with Dr. Mwamba:
»

You usually don’t see any FUE scarring from the face. It seems to heal very well from what I have gathered.


#12

» » » So how do all these surgeons doing body hair to head transplants avoid
» » » scarring patients when even the less intensive electrolysis has
» caused
» » me
» » » some pigment changes and scarring that lasted for months in the past?
» » »
» » » I just don’t understand all these great results from Dr. Arvind
» Poswal
» » and
» » » Dr. Sanusi Umar regarding BHT from beard to scalp, where the patients
» » have
» » » no scarring. I mean FUE is definitely more damaging than
» electrolysis
» » I
» » » would think?
» »
» » No not really. The electrolysis is electrocution. It can kill the
» cells
» » around the hair, under the skin. It is easier for the body to heal a
» small
» » incision, especially on the beard, where the skin has laxity.
» »
» » 2 days of healing after beard hair extraction with Dr. Mwamba:
» »
»
» You usually don’t see any FUE scarring from the face. It seems to heal
» very well from what I have gathered.

True. Electrolysis usually damages many surrounding follicles if applied to the scalp. It also doesn’t do the job in one session.

It is possible that collagen and blood flow are the reasons why the beard area heal so well.