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Read this carefully! You\'ll learn things :-)


#1

Dermal papilla (DP) cells, located at the base of the hair follicle, have been shown to have hairinductive
properties, and when cultured DP cells are re-implanted into a patient, they have been
found to promote new hair growth. ICX-TRC, also referred to as the “hairy generation cell” by Dr
Kemp, can work via two methods - by increasing the thickness of hair follicles that are already
present, and by producing brand new follicles. To date, this has been demonstrated in animal
models. Dr Kemp described how a completed phase I study involving seven patients
demonstrated no safety issues, with five of the seven subjects showing increased hair numbers
following treatment. Delivery of these cells is crucial, with a rapid injection making the cells go to
the bottom of the dermis layer, which is useless as the cells need to locate to the keratinocytes on
the superficial surface in order to allow for follicle growth. The optimal delivery method is via a
modified version of the Hamilton syringe, which is now an approved medical device. Phase II
efficacy trials are currently ongoing with this compound, involving approximately 10 patients per
cohort. This program was designed to optimize formulation/delivery of ICX-TRC. The first cohort
has completed enrolment, with six patients being treated. Preliminary data are anticipated to be
released in the second half of 2007.


#2

They are serious about this and they are sticking to their timetable. It’s a good sign, unlike Gho and Bazan who promised a lot and delivered nothing.


#3

» Dermal papilla (DP) cells, located at the base of the hair follicle, have
» been shown to have hairinductive
» properties, and when cultured DP cells are re-implanted into a patient,
» they have been
» found to promote new hair growth. ICX-TRC, also referred to as the “hairy
» generation cell” by Dr
» Kemp, can work via two methods - by increasing the thickness of hair
» follicles that are already
» present, and by producing brand new follicles. To date, this has been
» demonstrated in animal
» models. Dr Kemp described how a completed phase I study involving seven
» patients
» demonstrated no safety issues, with five of the seven subjects showing
» increased hair numbers
» following treatment. Delivery of these cells is crucial, with a rapid
» injection making the cells go to
» the bottom of the dermis layer, which is useless as the cells need to
» locate to the keratinocytes on
» the superficial surface in order to allow for follicle growth. The optimal
» delivery method is via a
» modified version of the Hamilton syringe, which is now an approved medical
» device. Phase II
» efficacy trials are currently ongoing with this compound, involving
» approximately 10 patients per
» cohort. This program was designed to optimize formulation/delivery of
» ICX-TRC. The first cohort
» has completed enrolment, with six patients being treated. Preliminary data
» are anticipated to be
» released in the second half of 2007.

the only objection I have is that they originaly aimed for first half of 2007 (they haven’t even updated their web so there they still claim first half of 2007). even 2 months ago they still were misleading people and talking about around mid 2007 (its somewhere here: http://www.intercytex.com/icx/investors/rep/2007-04-12/2007-04-12.pdf ), now it is second half.

anyway, where did you get this information from? Oh I know I should not ask dumb questions but use Google: http://www.terrapinn.com/2008/stemcells/data/07_analysis.pdf


#4

Great find!!! That’s why I love this forum it is always up to date on the latest in any news on HM. Very interesting find it sounds really encouraging I can’t wait to see the results. Probably won’t see them till September but that doesn’t matter if the results are good. Good news is always worth waiting for.


#5

“Delivery of these cells is crucial, with a rapid injection making the cells go to the bottom of the dermis layer, which is useless as the cells need to locate to the keratinocytes on the superficial surface in order to allow for follicle growth. The optimal delivery method is via a modified version of the Hamilton syringe, which is now an approved medical device.”

This was the part that caught my attention. It has always seemed to be crucial getting the depth of the injection just right, but hair follicles are pretty small and consistantly getting the right depth of injection thousands of times over would seems a very demanding thing to do by human hand. I’m not saying it’s a problem as they obviously have got it sorted but I was just wondering how? I’d have to check but I remember reading something about how the cells migrate to the correct part of the follicle.

I checked out the Hamilton syringes website but to my laymans eyes they just look like a regular syringe, although there must be a difference. Anyone knowledgeable out there care to elaborate?

This forum can be very good but it’s disheartening to see a post with, you know, actual, verified,information receive a fraction of the attention that one of the long rambling name calling threads get :frowning:


#6

» They are serious about this and they are sticking to their timetable. It’s
» a good sign, unlike Gho and Bazan who promised a lot and delivered
» nothing.

There is and always was a big difference. Gho and Bazan are surgeons. They did not, do not and probably never will have a true research arm in any scientific sense of the word. They have no more biotechnology credibility than your local refuse collector (and I do not want to insult refuse collectors). My opinion of both of these characters would be deleted by Hairsite for being too inflammatory. (an anogram is “HAS LOSES”)


#7

» This forum can be very good but it’s disheartening to see a post with,
» you know, actual, verified,information receive a fraction of the attention
» that one of the long rambling name calling threads get :frowning:

I could not agree more!:clap: …IMO the best value of a forum like this lies in sharing relevant, verifiable info, as well as I suppose, intelligent and logical argumentation- and we could use more of it!


#8

» » They are serious about this and they are sticking to their timetable.
» It’s
» » a good sign, unlike Gho and Bazan who promised a lot and delivered
» » nothing.
»
» There is and always was a big difference. Gho and Bazan are surgeons. They
» did not, do not and probably never will have a true research arm in any
» scientific sense of the word. They have no more biotechnology credibility
» than your local refuse collector (and I do not want to insult refuse
» collectors). My opinion of both of these characters would be deleted by
» Hairsite for being too inflammatory. (an anogram is “HAS LOSES”)

That is not true about Gho. His HM research was carried out under the close supervision of two of the most published and well-respected scientists in the world. Also, his ground-breaking HM related study was published in the most respected peer-reviewed medical journal in the world. This publication single-handedly led to a recent patent from Aderans Research Institute that uses the research as a basis of its technique. Thus, after many years, only now is Dr. Gho’s pioneering vision beginning to come into the mainstream. Gho’s failure was not due to his scientific inadequacies; it was due to his business partners failing to share his vision and subsequently pulling his research funding.

You’re just ticked off because after all that ground-breaking talent, vision, and effort, you’re still bald; thus, you are taking it out on the one guy you should be thanking for having broken this field of research wide open :smiley:


#9

» This was the part that caught my attention. It has always seemed to be
» crucial getting the depth of the injection just right, but hair follicles
» are pretty small and consistantly getting the right depth of injection
» thousands of times over would seems a very demanding thing to do by human
» hand. I’m not saying it’s a problem as they obviously have got it sorted
» but I was just wondering how? I’d have to check but I remember reading
» something about how the cells migrate to the correct part of the
» follicle.
»

My automated HM syringe based on the idea of a tatto gun would completely solve this problem. It would not only deliver the cells to an exacting depth in the skin, it would deliver them at a precise rate inside the skin. End of problem. I have actually drawn up the plans for one that will work (very different from a tatto gun in actuality). A potential addition is to alter the timings in the skin to hold slightly longer at certain crucial depths than others. Thus the injection timing would follow a precisely adjustable mathematical curve. Not only is my gun way more accurate than ICX’ methodology, it has way less cell wastage, and delivers way more injections per injection period. Thus it literally pays for itself after the first few applications (and results in way more hair per cm^2 thus delivering much higher patient satisfaction). It also somewhat addresses the dreaded Dr. Gho consistency problem.

I find it almost impossible to believe that ICX has not came to similar conclusions, and they are still experimenting around with inadequate systems that are subject to human inconsistencies and require the need of special training and talent on the part of those who administer the cells.

And how do they plan to perform a proper statisical analysis of their studies when they cannot write down precise depth and timing figures? If they want to market this as a cure anytime soon, they are going to have to start thinking outside the box a little more frequently.


#10

Yes James, you know the pros are looking into this IMHO.