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Opinions (Dr A, Dr Umar, Dr Woods as well as other drs.)


#1

The following was posted as per Checkingin’s request.

"Guys, I’ve attached a pic with examples of 3 different types of hair (s=scalp, b=beard, p=pubic). I’ve had scalp hair transplants and body hair transplants. I had about 250 beard grafts transplanted this past time (Dec '06) all into the strip scars. I had 330 Upper Pubic hairs transplanted to the recipient area.

I’ve attached a photo of 4 scalp hairs cut from side of head, 4 beard hairs that were cut actually growing in the strip scars and 4 pubic hairs cut from down south. I did this to get a difference in caliber, texture and color.

The only time I can pick out the pubic hairs transplanted to the top of my scalp are after I apply minoxidil and the rest of my hair is pretty flat at that time. I can then distinguish the hairs with a little more curl.

My hair is very fine and used to be very straight. Transplanted scalp hair has more curl/wave than it did in donor area.

The reason for the note is that I’m going for another session this December and am definitely going to use more pubic hair (at least upper). I am strongly considering using about 1,000 beard hairs. The face healed better and quicker than any other area. The beard hairs are heartier and a single beard hair equals at least 2 times the thickness of my scalp hair. Mixing this throughout my recipient area amongst my other transplanted hair would definitely give me additional density. The beard hair doesn’t stand out IMHO against the scalp hair.

I am figuring that the worst case scenario would be for me to have to wear my hair 1 inch or shorter which I don’t necessarily see as a bad thing. I’d like to hear what others think in regards to this." - checkingin


#2

I reduced the size of the picture so I can see all the different hair.
I hope you dont mind.

Checkingin, can you take a picture of the scar where these beard hair are growing? Has the hair growth led to pigmentary and texture changes in the scar?

Since, the beard hair are thicker calibre, I will expect more chance of pigment chages in scar compared to if thinner body hair was used.


#3

» I reduced the size of the picture so I can see all the different hair.
» I hope you dont mind.
»
»


»
» Checkingin, can you take a picture of the scar where these beard hair are
» growing? Has the hair growth led to pigmentary and texture changes in the
» scar?
»
» Since, the beard hair are thicker calibre, I will expect more chance of
» pigment chages in scar compared to if thinner body hair was used.

V, don’t mind at all in chaging the size of picture (hi BTW!). I’ll see if I can get my wife to take some pics. There is no question that there is some pigment and texture changes in the scar. When combing the hair up amongst the other hairs, sometimes I can’t even make out the scar in some areas.

I think/know that beard hair is particularly effective for providing camouflage for the strip scar.

I don’t necessarily think it is a problem for the top of the scalp if it is mixed wisely amongst other transplanted hair. It is thicker and it doesn’t seem to be too “wirey” in my case. Certainly it doesn’t have the curl of the pubic hair in the pic of which I have already transplanted some. As I said earlier, transplanted scalp hair has more “wave” to it than the hair depicted that was cut from the side.


#4

Interesting that you brought up this thread. We are doing a beard hair case today. We are doing about 5-600. The guy has exhausted everything else.


#5

» Interesting that you brought up this thread. We are doing a beard hair
» case today. We are doing about 5-600. The guy has exhausted everything
» else.

Can you give some details?? Location in recipient area, scalp to beard hair comparison, NW status and history, etc.??

Any opinions are greatly appreciated.


#6

Dear Checkingin,
Thank you for posting the picture.

In the past 16/17 months we have performed a sizable number of beard hair to scalp transplants.
That has included hair from below the chin area, as well as all along the neck and infraauricular areas.
We have also performed extractions and transplants from the sideburns and the cheeks.
In our experience, facial hair as an additional donor is a viable resource in most (not all) circumstances.

The salient observations till now are -

  1. If extracted properly, (both in terms of extraction methods and the randomness of pattern), there are no visible scars.
  2. When transplanted mixed with hair from other donor areas, none of the patients have mentioned them being noticeable in everyday life.
  3. The only way to be able to differentiate them is if the hair are cut and compared to the remaining hair, as you have done in your picture.

At present, my words of advise to prospective patients are -

  1. To use facial hair mixed with other donor hair.
  2. To extract in manner that the remaining beard does not look inappropriately depleted.
  3. To avoid/exercise caution using 3 hair beard grafts.
  4. All facial hair are not the same. The moustache hair, the hair high up on the cheeks or too low on the neck will have differing characteristics compared to the central beard areas. Keep this in mind when using the beard hair.

Regards,
Dr. A


#7

» I am figuring that the worst case scenario would be for me to have to wear
» my hair 1 inch or shorter which I don’t necessarily see as a bad thing.
» I’d like to hear what others think in regards to this."

Why do you think you have to wear your hair shorter? Your beard hair is clearly growing longer from the pic you posted.


#8

» » I am figuring that the worst case scenario would be for me to have to
» wear
» » my hair 1 inch or shorter which I don’t necessarily see as a bad thing.
»
» » I’d like to hear what others think in regards to this."
»
» Why do you think you have to wear your hair shorter? Your beard hair is
» clearly growing longer from the pic you posted.

Some people have argued against the use of beard hair in traditional recipient areas because they believe the hair too “wirey” for normal usage. I can tell the texture difference in my strip scars because they are all located in close proximity (very narrow area). It is not as easy now that they are grown out. The hair on sides of my head are kept shorter than top because I need the additional length of hairs on top to provide additional coverage. These hairs shown are only a couple inches long. I try to prepare myself for worst case scenario.

I’m less worried about an even distribution on top of my scalp in a very random pattern with no one area being over 5-6 FUE SQ/CM. I figure that is about 10-12 scalp hair FUE SQ/CM in density and coverage. I’d also concentrate on extracting singles and some doubles, but not triples beard FUE.

In my particular case, there is certainly less wave with beard hair than pubic hair. My scalp hair is very fine so I would not suspect there is as great a contrast between most folks as in my case. It blends very well and provides good coverage. I have a lot of hair in my recipient area so I would have a lot of hair with which to mix.

BTW, does anyone know what the average NW6 has in balding areas SQ CM?? I’m thinking 1,000 beard grafts with 200+ to go into strip scars for a second pass. That would leave 750-800 for up top at a density of 3.75-4 sq sm if 200 sq cm baldness.

One reason I started this thread (and other threads) is that Duck had mentioned that Dr Woods worked on a patient who asked to have the hairs removed. I wanted to find out more about this particular case, but haven’t gotten any responses as of yet.


#9

Anyone else??


#10

I’m curious why we don’t hear more about underarm hair. There was a time it was said to be impossible to use it because, I believe, of sweat glands or something. But, I know it has been used since then. In my case, there is not another hair source on my body that seems as similar to the hair on my head as does my underarm hair. How does its density compare to other hair sources, and why isn’t it used more often?


#11

» I’m curious why we don’t hear more about underarm hair. There was a time it
» was said to be impossible to use it because, I believe, of sweat glands or
» something. But, I know it has been used since then. In my case, there is
» not another hair source on my body that seems as similar to the hair on my
» head as does my underarm hair. How does its density compare to other hair
» sources, and why isn’t it used more often?

The underarm is probably a good source, assuming you want or need BH work. If one is going to make incisions in the skin, one could hardly ask for a more inconspicuous part of the body. I suspect the hair orientation in that area is difficult in terms of extraction. Doubt that the sweat glands present a problem though.


#12

» The underarm is probably a good source, assuming you want or need BH work.
» If one is going to make incisions in the skin, one could hardly ask for a
» more inconspicuous part of the body. I suspect the hair orientation in
» that area is difficult in terms of extraction. Doubt that the sweat glands
» present a problem though.

The under arm heals relatively fast. Underarm hairs are relatively hard to get. But it can be done as they are resilient to “pulling forces” No problems with “sweating” ever documented from transplanted hairs from underarm. The stench that occurs under your arm is from bacteria and bad hygiene. It should not happen on the scalp though.


#13

» The underarm is probably a good source, assuming you want or need BH work.
» If one is going to make incisions in the skin, one could hardly ask for a
» more inconspicuous part of the body. I suspect the hair orientation in
» that area is difficult in terms of extraction. Doubt that the sweat glands
» present a problem though.

Skin rubs against skin in the groin/pubic region and armpit.

This would normally cause rashes, friction irritation, and micro abrasions which would invite fungal, yeast and bacterial infections.

And every doctor in clinical practice sees it regularly as it is brought on by heat, exercise, and various things people spray on their armpit.

These friction “wet zones” are fertile breeding grounds for bugs BUT , Natures defence are the apocrine glands attached to the follicles.
They exude an oily secretion to lubricate against friction and heat and have an ANTIBACTERIAL, ANTI FUNGAL function .

They also causes body odour.

Depleting the armpit and groin of this natural defence and lubrication mechanism invites disease.

Maybe not everyone will be affected,but the laws of probability state that eventually it will happen.

If I performed this procedure, I would be worried every day that I may have , for the sake of a few hair, caused a painfull and chronic condition.

When many years ago I devised FUE , THE CORNERSTONE PRICIPLE WAS TO CAUSE NO HARM, and not to replace one problem with another.

There has been a well documented case of a patient who suffered large nasty lumps all over his body as a result of follicle extraction. It was fortunate that the arm pit and groin were left alone, otherwise, Hydradenitis Suppurative may have been a risk.

As for leg hair , it will grow, BUT, it is the last option for all the reasons I have stated previously on other threads.

Dr Ray Woods


#14

»
» They also causes body odour.
»
» Depleting the armpit and groin of this natural defence and lubrication
» mechanism invites disease.
»
» Maybe not everyone will be affected,but the laws of probability state that
» eventually it will happen.
»

I don’t necessarily agree with the armpit thing… look at my armpits… I have naturally 10 hairs at most. If your scenario was correct then I should have disease. And I am disease free… And my odour seems to be of a pleasant musky odiferousness. :smiley:


#15

» »
» » They also causes body odour.
» »
» » Depleting the armpit and groin of this natural defence and lubrication
» » mechanism invites disease.
» »
» » Maybe not everyone will be affected,but the laws of probability state
» that
» » eventually it will happen.
» »
»
» I don’t necessarily agree with the armpit thing… look at my armpits… I
» have naturally 10 hairs at most. If your scenario was correct then I should
» have disease. And I am disease free… And my odour seems to be of a
» pleasant musky odiferousness. :smiley:
»
»

ya i definitely dont agree with that post either.


#16

»

When you are sent to a maximum-security corrections facility for allegedly stealing an idea that was stolen to begin with…I strongly suggest you don’t show off those hairless armpits in the prison showers.


#17

» When you are sent to a maximum-security corrections facility for allegedly
» stealing an idea that was stolen to begin with…I strongly suggest you
» don’t show off those hairless armpits in the prison showers.

:smiley: :smiley:


#18

» I’m curious why we don’t hear more about underarm hair. There was a time it
» was said to be impossible to use it because, I believe, of sweat glands or
» something. But, I know it has been used since then. In my case, there is
» not another hair source on my body that seems as similar to the hair on my
» head as does my underarm hair. How does its density compare to other hair
» sources, and why isn’t it used more often?

Underarm hair is one of the better donor sources for body hair. The best sources (at least in my case) are underarm, chest and pubic. The reason for the interest in beard hair is that it has a thicker caliber than any of the other sources which makes it heartier by definition. Another compelling factor is that beard hair is almost always in an anagen state much like scalp hair.

Remember, prior to a body hair transplant session, the body is shaved so that only actively growing hairs are extracted. There is a lot less to choose from than one would think.


#19

Checkin I am beginning to lean towards beard hair more and more.

Some of guys are funny… especially the jail shower reference!:smiley: :clap:


#20

» Checkin I am beginning to lean towards beard hair more and more.
»
» Some of guys are funny… especially the jail shower reference!:smiley: :clap:

Does beard hair have the same yeild as other body hair?